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Prospect of the Day:

Jose De Leon, RHP, Dodgers (Triple-A Oklahoma City): 3 IP, 0 H, 0 R/ER, 0 BB, 6 K.
It’s not as much about what De Leon accomplished in this brief start—just his second of the year—as it is about the two-start total. In eight innings at Triple-A, De Leon has now allowed two hits and one walk, and struck out 15 batters. There may be opportunities with the Dodgers later this year depending on Alex Wood’s health and Julio Urias’ development at the big-league level, and De Leon could be positioning himself for that chance.

Others of Note:

Ryon Healy, 1B, Athletics (Triple-A Nashville): 3-5, 2 R, HR, 2 RBI, K. With 10 home runs already this season, Healy has matched his 2015 total and appears to be transforming some of his gap power into the over-the-fence variety. He still has a difficult profile, but he hasn’t lacked for performance to date and is off to a roaring start in 2016.

Ozzie Albies, SS, Braves (Triple-A Gwinnett): 3-4, R, 2B, 3B, RBI, BB, K. It’s easy to fall victim to disappointment when a player of Albies’ caliber doesn’t keep raking after a promotion, but he’s still just 19 years old and already in Triple-A, and games like this provide a reminder of his capabilities.

Touki Toussaint, RHP, Braves (Low-A Rome): 6 IP, 2 H, 0 R/ER, 3 BB, 9 K. Toussaint could really be so, so much fun if he can figure out how to harness his stuff.

Magneuris Sierra, OF, Cardinals (Low-A Peoria): 4-8, R, 3 2B, RBI, BB (Double-Header). Sierra is putting together a strong season in Low-A, and that continued with three doubles spread across a doubleheader yesterday.

Peter O’Brien, DH, Diamondbacks (Triple-A Reno): 2-3, 2 R, 2B, RBI, 2 BB. More extra-base hits, more walks, and more questions from scouts about just how much of his profile can successfully translate to the major-league level.

Francisco Mejia, C, Indians (Low-A Lake County): 2-4, 2 R, HR, 2 RBI, K. Still just 20 years old, Mejia has adjusted well in his second tour through the Midwest League, pounding opposing pitchers and displaying more poise in the box. It’s hard to call this a breakout for a player who’s been on the radar for several years, but it’s looking more and more like Mejia’s official coming-out party.

Brandon Nimmo, OF, Mets (Triple-A Las Vegas): 3-5, 2 R, HR, 3 RBI. After an injury plagued 2015 season, Nimmo has hit well in Las Vegas this year, though his performance has yet to jump off the page in an offensively charged environment. Nimmo is likely to be the type of player that has to prove it at the big-league level before people truly buy in.

Wilmer Difo, SS, Nationals (Double-A Harrisburg): 2-4, R, 3B, RBI. This season hasn’t been much to write home about for Difo, but he still has the skills to be an impact player. Here’s hoping a couple of hits, including a triple, are enough to get him going.

Victor Robles, OF, Nationals (Low-A Hagerstown): 3-4, R, RBI, BB. My heart melts.

Nick Williams, OF, Phillies (Triple-A Lehigh Valley): 3-4, 2 R, 2B, 2 RBI, K, SB. Everybody knows by now that Williams can straight-up hit the baseball. There are rightfully massive concerns about his approach and ability to handle big-league pitchers consistently, but it’s hard to argue against the developmental progress and the results in 2016.

Travis Demeritte, 2B, Rangers (High-A High Desert): 2-4, R, 2B, HR, RBI, K. Demeritte has so many tools at his disposal that it borders on embarrassing, but he’s also extremely raw. Despite the growth needed, it is exciting when he jumps on pitches he can drive like he did last night.

Brendan Rodgers, SS, Rockies (Low-A Ashville): 3-5, R, 2 2B. Our friend Christopher Crawford has waxed poetic about Rodgers on plenty of occasions this year, so there is little else I can add at this point, but he still deserves to be highlighted as he continues to have big games.

Matt Hall, LHP, Tigers (Low-A West Michigan): 5 IP, 2 H, 0 R/ER, 3 BB, 7 K. Hall moved to 7-0 on the season and lowered his ERA to 0.65 with Tuesday night’s start. A sixth-round pick last summer, Hall’s breaking ball and sequencing can torture A-ball hitters, meaning he needs a promotion quickly, so he can actually be tested as a professional.

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heterodude
6/08
DSL stats are tough to go off of, but recent Mariners bonus-baby Brayan Hernandez went 5-6 yesterday with a double and three runs scored. He had a rough go of it last year, but I know Mr. Crawford has spoke of his high ceiling.
touchstoneQu
6/08
I believe Healy is still in the Oakland system. (When I saw "HOU," I had to Google to see if there had been a trade in the night...alas, no.)
juice133
6/08
My mistake in typing that up last night. Thanks for catching it.
proteinwisdom
6/08
How difficult is it for scouts assessing "how well his profile can successfully translate to the major-league level" to say to an American League club, "hey, you might want to trade for this O'Brien cat and stick him at DH. He can play a passable corner outfield, first base, and even catch, in a pinch, so if you can get him 550 ABs a year, there's a good chance he'll hit you 25-35 homers and drive in a ton of runs."

His profile is, he hits the ball far and he does it fairly often. There's not a whole lot left for him to prove in AAA, particularly if he's going to start taking walks.
juice133
6/08
It's only difficult in the sense that the walks have to continue. He's been doing it a little more lately, but not enough to suggest it's a trend and something that he is going to sustain. If he keeps working counts, taking walks, and generally developing his approach, then the questions will begin to fade.
MaineSkin
6/08
Benintendi still struggling at AA Portland. All power and OBP has disappeared in the first 70 AB. Any worry?
Muboshgu
6/08
A to AA is the hardest jump in professional baseball (save AAA to MLB). Give the kid some time to adjust.
juice133
6/08
I'm not worried at all. It's 70 ABs.