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Team Injury Projections

The Team Injury Projections are here, driven by our brand new injury forecasting system, the Comprehensive Health Index [of] Pitchers [and] Players [with] Evaluative Results—or, more succinctly, CHIPPER. Thanks to work by Colin Wyers and Dan Turkenkopf and a database loaded with injuries dating back to the 2002 season—that's nearly 4,600 players and well over 400,000 days lost to injury—we now have a system that produces injury-risk assessments to three different degrees. CHIPPER projects ratings for players based on their injury history—these ratings measure the probability of a player missing one or more games, 15 or more games, or 30 or more games. CHIPPER will have additional features added to it throughout the spring and early season that will enhance the accuracy of our injury coverage.

These ratings are also available in the Player Forecast Manager (pfm.baseballprospectus.com), where they'll be sortable by league or position—you won’t have to wait for us to finish writing this series in order to see the health ratings for all of the players.

KANSAS CITY ROYALS
Team Audit | Depth Chart
 

Dashboard


2010 Recap
 

2010
 

2009
 

2008
 

2007
5th in AL Central
32 entries
14 DL trips
               

946
TDL

30
DMPI
 

946
TDL
18th
 

30
DMPI
27th
 

1165
TDL
21st
 

22
DMPI
17th
 

830
TDL
12th
 

19
DMPI
10th
 

1361
TDL
26th
 

41
DMPI
28th

Hitters in approximate Depth Charts order at time of publication

 

Days Lost to Injury

2011 Injury Risk

Player

Age

2008

2009

2010

1-day

15-days

30-days
Lorenzo Cain

25

0

0

0

Yellow

Green

Green
Mike Aviles

30

1

139

0

Red

Red

Red
Billy Butler

25

0

0

4

Yellow

Green

Green
Kila Ka'aihue

27

0

0

0

Yellow

Green

Green
Alex Gordon

27

25

93

22

Red

Red

Red
Jeff Francoeur

27

0

2

1

Yellow

Green

Green
Alcides Escobar

24

0

0

1

Yellow

Green

Green
Jason Kendall

37

0

0

35

Red

Yellow

Green
Chris Getz

27

41

40

36

Red

Red

Red
Melky Cabrera

26

0

8

0

Yellow

Green

Green
Wilson Betemit

29

37

0

3

Yellow

Green

Green
Mitch Maier

29

22

0

7

Yellow

Green

Green
Lucas May

26

0

0

0

Green

Green

Green
Brayan Pena

29

18

0

0

Yellow

Green

Green

Pitchers in approximate Depth Charts order at time of publication

 

Days Lost to Injury

2011 Injury Risk

Player

Age

2008

2009

2010

1-day

15-days

30-days
Luke Hochevar

27

39

0

83

Yellow

Yellow

Green
Jeff Francis

30

38

191

75

Red

Red

Red
Kyle Davies

27

0

21

0

Green

Green

Green
Bruce Chen

34

0

17

0

Yellow

Yellow

Green
Vin Mazzaro

24

0

32

0

Green

Green

Green
Sean O'Sullivan

23

0

0

0

Green

Green

Green
Joakim Soria

27

0

34

0

Green

Green

Green
Robinson Tejeda

29

9

30

37

Yellow

Green

Green
Blake Wood

25

0

0

9

Green

Green

Green
Jesse Chavez

27

0

0

0

Green

Green

Green
Jeremy Jeffress

23

0

0

0

Green

Green

Green
Gregory Holland

25

0

0

0

Green

Green

Green
Kanekoa Texeira

25

0

0

31

Green

Green

Green

Summary: On the list of things wrong with the Royals, injuries do make an appearance—they just find themselves well down the list. In terms of total injuries, the Royals rated well; unfortunately, the severity of those injuries caused them to sacrifice more days to the DL than all but a handful of teams. These weren’t just bench players, either: everyday players went down for extended periods of time, among them David DeJesus, Robinson Tejeda, Luke Hochevar, Gil Meche, Rick Ankiel, and Josh Fields. Of course, given that Ankiel, Fields, Hochevar, etc. were considered important pieces, it's not like perfect health would have changed the season's outcome much.

The Royals received personnel makeovers this year all over the diamond. Jeff Francoeur and Melky Cabrera signed on for 2011—both players have proven in the past that they can remain healthy during the regular season, though the pair has also proven that being around all the time needn't necessarily be a positive. Durability would be a welcome change from DeJesus, though an injured DeJesus might be preferable to a healthy Francoeur or Cabrera.

At least Lorenzo Cain has a chance to preserve the memory of a useful-but-perpetually-injured outfielder. Cain has suffered multiple injuries to his lower body over the last two years while in the minors, which could constitute a trend. Take a look at Alex Gordon's days missed the last three years. Now look at his injury ratings. It's good to know that CHIPPER is working.

Alcides Escobar came along with Cain in the Zack Greinke trade and should occupy the starting shortstop role all year. He is considered low-risk, and on a performance level, he has much more upside than his predecessor at the position. Mike Aviles had Tommy John surgery in 2009, but it appears as though he has recovered fully from the procedure. Chris Getz has missed at least 30 games in each of the past three years, and CHIPPER sees him tacking on a (un)lucky fourth.

Hochevar's sprained elbow is not a death sentence (we haven't decided what color that rating is yet), but it is a cause for concern. He was placed on a proper strengthening program in an attempt to dynamically stabilize the area, a strategy that does work well in certain cases. However, when fatigue sets in, Hochevar can lose that dynamic stability.

Jeff Francis’s outlook is bleaker. Continued shoulder strains and inflammation in years following surgery does not bode well for his effectiveness. He was supposed to recover in 2010 following major arm surgery in 2009, but instead missed over 70 games and now finds himself trying to resuscitate his career with the pitching-thin Royals. Bruce Chen, who's at the low end of the moderate-risk range, is now two years removed from Tommy John surgery. Kyle Davies and Vin Mazzaro are both low risks despite missing some time from strains and inflammation in 2009. Joakim Soria was injury-free in 2010, which represented a change of pace from 2007 through 2009, when he was nagged by minor shoulder problems.

The Big Risk: Soria defaults to this spot, since the team lacks players of significance on its current roster. Billy Butler has Kila Ka'aihue to step in if things go wrong—Soria would be replaced by Tejeda, who has had his own shoulder problems in the past. The team isn't expected to have many leads to begin with, so the health of their most important pitcher is vital to their holding on to any they do get.

Comeback: As the sole important previously-injured player to return to the club in 2011, Hochevar is the last man standing for this spot. As we have seen with Adam Wainwright and others, mild sprains of the elbow can be managed for some time without surgery, and the results can still be excellent. Hochevar returned before the end of the 2010 season and didn't turn any heads, but he at least stayed healthy. He should benefit from an entire offseason devoted to continuing to strengthen the area and improve his muscular endurance.

Best Health: Alcides Escobar hasn't figured out how to hit yet, but he was healthy in his first full campaign in the bigs.

Worst Health: Incurring shoulder injuries following shoulder surgery is a foolproof plan for qualifying as the least healthy player on a team. Congratulations, Jeff Francis.