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The tiered rankings series continues with the second installment of our outfield rankings. This, of course, was a collaborative effort as J.P. Breen handled the top 30 outfielders yesterday.

Players at each position will be divided into five tiers, represented by a “star” rating. Five-star players are the studs at their position. In general, they are the players who will be nabbed in the first couple of rounds of the draft, and they will fetch auction bids in excess of $30. Four-star players are a cut below the studs at the position. They will also be early-round selections, and they are projected to be worth more than $20 in most cases. Three-star players are the last tier in which players are projected to provide double-digit dollar value in auctions, and two-star players are projected to earn single digits in dollar value in auctions. One-star players are late-round sleepers and roster placeholders. The positional tiers aren't simply a regurgitation of last year’s values but rather try to offer some insights into what we expect will happen in 2015.

We retained last year's roster requirements for the positional tier series. Dollar values come from last year’s PFM using a 12-team, standard 5×5 scoring format, with 23-man rosters and the following positions: C (2) 1B (1) 2B (1) 3B (1) SS (1) CI (1) MI (1) OF (5) UT (1) P (9). The minimum bid for players is $1, and, as we did last year, we'll allocate $180 of a $260 budget to hitters. Players needed to play in 20 games at a position to qualify there. The PFM is customizable, so if your league uses a different format you can adjust it to match your league settings and see how it impacts players’ dollar values.

Players with multi-position eligibility are listed at the position where it is most likely they would start in a standard fantasy league, which means some players with outfield eligibility may be located in a different tiered rankings list.

Three Stars (continued)

Player

Team

Mixed $

AL/NL $

PA

R

HR

RBI

SB

AVG

Marcell Ozuna

MIA

$14.49

$21.10

612

72

23

85

3

.269

Brett Gardner

NYY

$18.80

$26.82

636

87

17

58

21

.256

Denard Span

WAS

$21.93

$28.36

668

94

5

37

31

.302

Matt Holliday

STL

$17.17

$22.24

667

83

20

90

4

.272

These players fell just short of making the top 30, but we’re still calling them three stars. Coming off offseason surgery for a hernia puts a bit of a damper on Span’s outlook for this season, but he was outstanding last season as he posted a career-high contact rate and hit at least .300 and scored at least 90 runs for the first time since 2009.

Gardner reached double-digit home runs for the first time last year, blasting 17. Nine of his homers came on the road, so the power is not just a product of Yankees Stadium, but it’ll be interesting to see if he’s pitched differently this year. More walks and times on base could mean more stolen base opportunities for Gardner.

Three-Star Value Pick: Marcell Ozuna
Ozuna strikes out a ton and will struggle to hit above .270 without a high BABIP, but he has legitimate power. While Giancarlo Stanton and Christian Yelich may overshadow Ozuna in the Marlins offense, don’t forget about him come draft time. Ozuna’s NFBC ADP is currently 137, which is 37th among outfielders and, frankly, too low.

Two Stars

Player

Team

Mixed $

AL/NL $

PA

R

HR

RBI

SB

AVG

Mookie Betts

BOS

($8.18)

$3.21

213

34

5

18

7

.291

J.D. Martinez

DET

$13.28

$20.86

480

57

23

76

6

.315

Leonys Martin

TEX

$14.59

$25.74

583

68

7

40

31

.274

AJ Pollack

ARI

($1.19)

$10.93

287

41

7

24

14

.302

Alex Rios

KC

$6.32

$16.59

521

54

4

54

17

.280

Rusney Castillo

BOS

40

6

2

6

3

.333

Wil Myers

SD

($6.56)

$4.18

361

37

6

35

6

.222

Lorenzo Cain

KC

$13.06

$23.95

502

55

5

53

28

.301

Yasmany Tomas

ARI

Jorge Soler

CHC

$0.80

97

11

5

20

1

.292

Jayson Werth

WAS

$18.45

$23.32

629

85

16

82

9

.292

Khris Davis

MIL

$9.31

$17.88

549

70

22

69

4

.244

Desmond Jennings

TB

$4.27

$14.80

542

64

10

36

15

.244

Austin Jackson

SEA

$9.02

$19.06

656

71

4

47

20

.256

Coco Crisp

OAK

$8.05

$18.14

536

68

9

47

19

.246

Oswaldo Arcia

MIN

$0.41

$9.58

410

46

20

57

1

.231

Gregory Polanco

PIT

($0.67)

$11.07

312

50

7

33

14

.235

Marlon Byrd

CIN

$14.89

$21.66

637

71

25

85

3

.264

Steven Souza

TB

($2.82)

26

2

2

2

0

.130

Carl Crawford

LAD

$8.93

$19.55

370

56

8

46

23

.300

Joc Pederson

LAD

($3.59)

38

1

0

0

0

.143

Torii Hunter

MIN

$13.42

$19.82

586

71

17

83

4

.286

Dustin Ackley

SEA

$6.79

$15.50

542

64

14

65

8

.245

Adam Eaton

CHW

$6.78

$15.92

538

76

1

35

15

.300

Curtis Granderson

NYM

$9.73

$18.75

654

73

20

66

8

.227

Everyone loves Mookie, but PECOTA really loves him. He’s projected to hit .280 with 11 home runs, 80 runs, and 26 steals in his first full season. His time in this tier could be brief.

While J.D. Martinez’ strikeout rate and BABIP from last season scream regression, he’s shown enough at the plate to believe he’ll still hit .270 with power. Unfortunately, from a value perspective, he and Rusney Castillo (119) have the highest NFBC ADPs beside Mookie Betts in this tier. Helium is also hurting Gregory Polanco as his NFBC ADP of 135 is higher than those of both Marcell Ozuna and Brett Gardner.

I’m pretty close to being done with the Desmond Jennings-Austin Jackson-Coco Crisp group altogether. Jackson’s been an up-and-down player throughout his career, but he completely fell apart after he was traded to Seattle last year. Jennings still hasn’t figured out right-handed pitching and Crisp’s 2013 power breakout was perhaps a fluke, not to mention he seems to be breaking down physically.

Steven Souza is nearly 26 and has just 26 career plate appearances in the majors. He’s also the owner of one of the most interesting PECOTA projections (.261, 25 home runs, 26 steals, 83 runs, and 80 RBI) this year.

Marlon Byrd is the Matt Holliday of this tier. He’s old and doesn’t have a ton of upside, but he is reliable.

Two-Star Value Pick: Dustin Ackley
Ackley has been a frustrating player to follow over the years because he seems to be constantly tinkering with his approach. He started swinging more at the midway point last year, trading walks for more solid contract and he hit .269/.307/.476 in the second half. Hopefully, he sticks with this approach since the adjustment produced positive results. His NFBC ADP is a laughably low 317, which is 78th among outfielders. Somehow Allen Craig is being taken ahead of him. It’s a joke.

One Star

Player

Name

Mixed $

AL/NL $

PA

R

HR

RBI

SB

AVG

Avisail Garcia

CHW

($11.36)

$1.17

190

19

7

29

4

.244

Alejandro De Aza

BAL

$4.24

$15.20

528

56

8

41

17

.252

Dexter Fowler

CHC

$2.75

$12.72

505

61

8

35

11

.276

Michael Saunders

TOR

($5.50)

$4.51

263

38

8

34

4

.273

Angel Pagan

SF

$2.03

$13.40

413

56

3

27

16

.300

David Peralta

ARI

($2.56)

$8.94

348

30

8

36

6

.286

Rajai Davis

DET

$18.22

$29.28

494

64

8

51

36

.282

Anthony Gose

DET

($8.26)

$4.44

274

31

2

13

15

.226

Carlos Beltran

NYY

($0.77)

$8.51

449

46

15

49

3

.233

Michael Cuddyer

NYM

($5.72)

$6.54

205

32

10

31

3

.332

Travis Snider

BAL

$7.59

359

37

12

38

1

.264

Josh Reddick

OAK

$0.17

$8.59

396

53

12

54

1

.264

Dominic Brown

PHI

$1.21

$12.40

512

47

10

63

7

.235

Norichika Aoki

SF

$5.61

$15.65

549

63

1

43

17

.285

B.J. Upton

ATL

$5.36

$17.36

582

67

12

35

20

.208

Michael Bourn

CLE

($1.12)

$8.56

487

57

3

28

10

.257

While this tier doesn’t look that bad, most of the one-star players are below the line for standard mixed leagues.

Michael Saunders will be a good power and speed combination if he can stay healthy in Toronto’s revamped lineup, just don’t expect him to repeat his AVG.

Angel Pagan hasn’t played 100 games since 2012 and is coming off back surgery for a bulging disc. He’s a risky proposition at this point in his career.

Rajai Davis checks in ahead of Anthony Gose here despite the assumption that Gose will play more this season. Playing time against right-handed pitching could be sparse for Davis, but Gose still needs to show he can hit and steal bases. Both players are better suited for “only” leagues, where speed-only players are more valuable.

One-Star Value Pick: Travis Snider
Snider isn’t going to be the player the Blue Jays thought they were getting when they drafted him 14th overall in 2006, but he’s revived his fantasy stock after looking like a complete bust not so long ago. The trade to Baltimore and the other hitter friendly ballparks in the AL East should give his power numbers a little boost. He’s being drafted like he’s completely off the radar as his current NFBC ADP is 484, which is 103rd among outfielders.