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Articles Tagged Pitchers 

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12-04

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3

Retrospective Player Valuation: Mixed-League Pitchers
by
Mike Gianella

11-20

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0

Retrospective Player Valuation: National League Pitchers
by
Mike Gianella

11-13

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8

Retrospective Player Valuation: American League Pitchers
by
Mike Gianella

10-02

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2

Fantasy Freestyle: Are Elite Pitchers Becoming More Numerous?
by
J.P. Breen

07-01

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4

Baseball Therapy: Do Some Pitches Do More Damage Than Others?
by
Russell A. Carleton

07-01

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1

Moonshot: Survival of the Fittest: Pitchers
by
Robert Arthur

05-30

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3

Working the Count: The Five-Day Pitcher Injury Zone
by
Noah Woodward

05-28

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13

The Lineup Card: 13 Pitcher Injuries We Wish We Could Undo
by
Baseball Prospectus

05-22

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0

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 455: Stan Conte on What We Need to Know About Pitcher Injuries
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

05-15

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3

Overthinking It: Have Tommy John Surgery, Sign Long-Term Contract?
by
Ben Lindbergh

03-18

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6

Five to Watch: National League Prospects
by
Bret Sayre

08-06

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13

Baseball Therapy: Prioritizing the Pitcher's Health
by
Russell A. Carleton

05-09

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0

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 199: Pitchers Putting on Sunscreen/The Astros and Clubhouse Chemistry
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

03-21

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5

BP Unfiltered: Tommy Hanson, Shaun Marcum, and Causes for Concern
by
Ben Lindbergh

03-01

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3

Pitcher Profile: New Arms of the Week, First Edition
by
Harry Pavlidis

02-18

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23

Baseball Therapy: What Really Predicts Pitcher Injuries?
by
Russell A. Carleton

01-28

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25

Baseball Therapy: Fact or Fiction: The Verducci Effect
by
Russell A. Carleton

01-23

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0

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 124: A World Without Easily Injured Pitchers/Hitter BABIP, and Whether Mike Trout Was Lucky/What We Think About Booing
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

01-18

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3

A Little Relief
by
Jonah Birenbaum

01-02

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0

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 110: Players with Criminal Pasts/How Much Do Pitcher Hitting, Fielding, and Baserunning Matter?
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

10-05

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5

Raising Aces: For Those About to Watch (We Salute You)
by
Doug Thorburn

09-27

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7

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 51: What the Rockies Knew About Ubaldo/The Eternal Torii Hunter/Declining Dan Haren
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

07-11

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13

Pebble Hunting: How Pitchers React to Home Runs
by
Sam Miller

06-29

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3

The Stats Go Marching In: Should Pitchers Change Their Between-Innings Routine?
by
Max Marchi

06-29

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9

Prospectus Q&A: Pitcher Workloads and Innings Limits: Two Industry Perspectives
by
Ben Lindbergh

06-04

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11

Future Shock Blog: Draft Day Dream Crushing
by
Kevin Goldstein

05-31

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7

On the Beat: Fireballer in the Hole
by
John Perrotto

04-23

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1

Prospectus Hit and Run: Bartolo Colon and the Comeback Kids
by
Jay Jaffe

03-12

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12

Prospectus Hit and Run: NL Rotation Rumble
by
Jay Jaffe

03-07

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43

Prospectus Hit and Run: Inspecting the Spectrum, Part IV: The Designated Hitter Question
by
Jay Jaffe

12-30

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0

The BP Wayback Machine: Pitching to the Score
by
Greg Spira

11-22

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30

Spinning Yarn: How Does Quality of Contact Relate to BABIP?
by
Mike Fast

11-16

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41

Spinning Yarn: Who Controls How Hard the Ball is Hit?
by
Mike Fast

10-31

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10

Prospectus Hit and Run: A Weighty Matter
by
Jay Jaffe

05-24

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5

Baseball ProGUESTus: Answers from a Sabermetrician, Part 1
by
Tom Tango

03-17

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15

The BP Wayback Machine: How Much Control Do Hurlers Have?
by
Voros McCracken

02-25

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1

Prospectus Hit and Run: Are You Experienced?
by
Jay Jaffe

02-16

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59

Spinning Yarn: The Real Strike Zone
by
Mike Fast

01-27

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21

Ahead in the Count: Testing SIERA
by
Matt Swartz

01-17

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0

Ahead in the Count: Situational Pitching
by
Matt Swartz

12-15

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27

Ahead in the Count: Ground-ballers: Better than You Think
by
Matt Swartz

11-11

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7

Spinning Yarn: Pitcher Release Points
by
Mike Fast

10-26

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8

Spinning Yarn: Interpreting Pitch Classifications
by
Mike Fast

10-14

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20

Spinning Yarn: The Glavine Line
by
Mike Fast

08-10

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32

Checking the Numbers: '90s Nine, Meet the '00s Ten
by
Eric Seidman

05-28

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1

Ahead in the Count: Hometown Discounts
by
Matt Swartz

03-30

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16

Long Tossing
by
Gary Armida

12-11

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9

Checking the Numbers: On the Swing
by
Eric Seidman

09-29

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9

Ahead in the Count: Pitcher BABIP by Count
by
Matt Swartz

09-18

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3

Checking the Numbers: Whiffing the Pitcher, Part Two
by
Eric Seidman

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December 4, 2014 6:00 am

Retrospective Player Valuation: Mixed-League Pitchers

3

Mike Gianella

An in-depth look at pitchers' returns on fantasy investments in mixed formats during the past season.

This is the final installment in a six-part series on player valuation. The first five parts of the series covered AL and NL-only league valuation for hitters and pitchers, and mixed-league valuation for hitters. This article concludes the series with a look back at pitchers.

As with the mixed league hitters, there are no plans to reinvent the wheel and run through the painstaking steps that got me to my mixed league valuations. There is a significant change on the pitching side of the ledger that will be addressed within the body of the article. A full look at the methodology behind the valuations can be found here.

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November 20, 2014 6:00 am

Retrospective Player Valuation: National League Pitchers

0

Mike Gianella

An in-depth look at senior-circuit arms' fantasy performance during the past year.

This is the fourth part of a six-part series looking back at valuation in 2014. Today, I look at what pitchers earned in the National League.

Before I dig in, here is a brief description of the charts below.

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November 13, 2014 6:00 am

Retrospective Player Valuation: American League Pitchers

8

Mike Gianella

An in-depth look at junior-circuit arms' fantasy performance during the past year.

On Tuesday, I took a look back at American League hitters from a Rotisserie valuation standpoint. Today, I’ll tackle the pitchers in the junior circuit.

Before I dig in, here is a brief description of the charts below.

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October 2, 2014 6:00 am

Fantasy Freestyle: Are Elite Pitchers Becoming More Numerous?

2

J.P. Breen

We might be in the "Era of the Pitcher," but does that mean that the league is teeming with top-shelf arms?

Early last week, I reintroduced the concept of the Holy Trinity and outlined the 19 starting pitchers who qualified for the elite status. Furthermore, I argued that Holy Trinity pitchers, on average, significantly outperform the league-average pitcher. While that’s not a groundbreaking discovery, the estimated margin of 1.00 ERA for any HT pitcher over the league-average starter is remarkable enough to perhaps persuade fantasy owners to specifically alter their draft board in order to target them.

However, the HT list from 2014 is merely a piece of the puzzle. It begs the question: Are HT pitchers increasing in frequency as pitching continues to dominate across Major League Baseball?

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The injury impact of high-stress innings.

In their recent “position paper” on preventing elbow injuries in Major League (and Minor League and College and High School and Little League) Baseball, Drs. James Andrews and Glen Fleisig had an interesting recommendation for young pitchers: Don’t throw with 100 percent effort on every pitch. The arm, particularly the elbow, isn’t made to take that much stress all the time.

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July 1, 2014 6:00 am

Moonshot: Survival of the Fittest: Pitchers

1

Robert Arthur

How do we know which hurlers will have long careers?

In the recent past, we’ve seen the rise of a generation of young and highly talented pitchers. From Corey Kluber to Chris Sale, from international acquisitions like Masahiro Tanaka to the sadly injured Jose Fernandez, young hurlers occupy an increasing share of the game’s best pitching matchups. Indeed, of the leaders in this year’s Cy Young race, only four of the top 10 are over 30. It’s easy to forget that even veteran aces Felix Hernandez and Johnny Cueto are still only 28. With the exception of some old stalwarts like Adam Wainwright and Mark Buerhle, the game’s best and brightest seem to be tilting toward youth.

If it seems to be the case, that’s only because it is. Younger pitchers are piling up the WAR(P) at an accelerated rate relative to the past couple of decades.

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Can we detect signs of impending injury in the start BEFORE a pitcher's fateful outing?

Last week, I wrote about Jose Fernandez, his attorney’s comments about the cause of his season-ending injury, and warning signs that preceded his exit from his final start of 2014. After I wrote that article, I began to think more about the righty’s second-to-last start. Could this injury have been prevented a week earlier? I also took to heart a popular criticism of the “injury zone” research supporting that article. Some argue that it doesn’t identify injury risk in time to actually prevent a ligament from tearing, and that it instead picks up on injuries that have already occurred.

Read the full article...

The staff would love to see what these pitchers would have done had their careers not been medically derailed.

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Ben and Sam talk to Dodgers VP of Medical Services and Head Athletic Trainer Stan Conte about the pitcher injury epidemic.

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Are recent Tommy John surgery victims about to become a new kind of contract extension candidate?

About a year ago, Sam Miller speculated about the future of contract extensions, which had by then been embraced by big-market teams after years of mostly being the province of small-market clubs. “When that happens,” Sam wrote, “the market inefficiency might as well be gone.” To regain an edge, teams would have to get more creative with the kind of extensions they offered.

One of Sam’s suggestions was that we might start to see much longer extensions—contracts that would pay a player for 15 years or more. That hasn’t happened yet. However, Sam made two more predictions that have come to pass. First, he suggested that a team might offer a player an extension before his big-league debut, which has since occurred in the cases of George Springer and the Astros and Gregory Polanco and the Pirates. And second, he proposed that teams that lock up more marginal players than had previously been considered extendable. “Of the 20 players who have signed extensions longer than four years since the start of last season, all are, if not stars, something close to it,” Sam wrote. Since then, non-stars Jedd Gyorko, Yan Gomes (debatable), and Jose Quintana have signed five-year deals, not to mention Michael Brantley and Sean Doolittle, who’ve inked four-year pacts.

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March 18, 2014 6:00 am

Five to Watch: National League Prospects

6

Bret Sayre

These five top-100 arms could help your fantasy team in the near future.

As the spring builds up and draws to a close, there is a lot to pay attention to. One of said things is the impression that prospects make in camp that can either win them an unexpected spot on a team’s roster or put them in better position for a call-up once the season gets going. Here are five players with prospect eligibility (for fantasy purposes, we don’t care about service time) who are making a positive impression this spring that could lead to heightened fantasy value in 2014.

Carlos Martinez, P, St. Louis Cardinals
The recipient of far too many Pedro Martinez comps in the minor leagues (he’s a vertically-challenged Dominican starter with great raw stuff, so of course Pedro, duh), Martinez is being given a legitimate shot to beat out Joe Kelly for the final spot in the Cardinals’ rotation this spring. This opportunity was made possible by yet another Jaime Garcia shoulder setback, but if it happens, it could vault Martinez’ fantasy star through the roof.


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August 6, 2013 6:00 am

Baseball Therapy: Prioritizing the Pitcher's Health

13

Russell A. Carleton

Reexamining the subject of pitcher abuse.

Over the past few weeks, I've been taking an in-depth look at a single decision made by a manager: Tim Lincecum's 148-pitch no-hitter from a few weeks ago. Bruce Bochy left Lincecum in well past the usual 100-pitch limit to give him a chance at baseball immortality. But at what cost? We've seen that if a pitcher makes his next start on regular rest, there is a small carry-over effect of throwing a lot of pitches, but it's not all that big and it might even just be a methodological quirk anyway. We've seen some evidence that taking a pitcher out of a shutout (not necessarily a no-hitter) doesn't seem to affect him for good or for ill. But what about the obvious question. Are marathon pitching sessions penny-wise and pound-foolish?

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