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Even in Triple-A, Vladimir Guerrero still swings at and makes contact with almost everything.

You'd think the Pacific Coast League would be filled with players who hadn't learned how to take a walk. You'd also think that PCL pitchers would be so intimidated to see Vladimir Guerrero that they'd pitch around him. Because of both of those things, you'd probably think that at some point in his first 30 appearances for the Blue Jays' Triple-A affiliate, the Las Vegas 51s, Vladimir Guerrero would have walked, and that he wouldn't have the lowest walk rate of any PCL player who'd made that many trips to the plate.

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June 17, 2011 9:00 am

Collateral Damage: Kneed to Know

5

Corey Dawkins and Ben Lindbergh

Darwin Barney and Allen Craig succumb to knee problems, Brandon Lyon takes one step closer to season-ending surgery, and Eduardo Sanchez strains a shoulder.

Darwin Barney, CHN (Left knee PCL sprain)
Headfirst slides are more dangerous than feetfirst slides, especially at home plate, but they are necessary at times in order to avoid a tag. As Barney slid headfirst to score the winning run on Monday night, he landed on his left knee and tried to push off it at the same time to avoid a tag. While he was successful in scoring the run, he also felt his leg go numb.

Barney finished the game, but he woke up the next day with a very sore knee. After consulting with the Cubs’ medical staff, he was sent for an MRI, which confirmed the Grade I posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injury. Barney was subsequently placed on the 15-day disabled list.


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With awards season upon us, Dan looks to the minors to crown this year's best and worst baserunners down on the farm.

"Maybe being a minor league baseball player makes you insane. Maybe you just have to be crazy to be a minor league baseball player."
--Jim Bouton, from I'm Glad You Didn't Take it Personally


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January 29, 2007 12:00 am

The Ledger Domain: Q&A with Branch Rickey III

0

Maury Brown

Running the Pacific Coast League is how this third-generation baseball man continues the family tradition of service to the game.

The name "Rickey" evokes a strong place in baseball history with Branch Rickey Jr.'s signing of Jackie Robinson to break the color barrier, as well as the same man's introduction and development of the farm system.

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August 8, 2005 12:00 am

The Claussen Pickle, Revisited

0

Jay Jaffe

Jay wonders how much young talent the Braves traded away during their impressive decade-plus reign over the NL East.

Lo and behold, the Braves are at it again, having recently zoomed past the Washington Nationals and into first place, swinging the balance of power in the NL East by about 10 games in the standings over a six-week period and doing so with a roster that's included as many as 10 rookies. Most notably, Jeff Francoeur has hit a whopping .397/.405/.781 with seven homers in his first 21 games, Wilson Betemit has hit .307/.360/.474 while covering for an injured Chipper Jones, and Kyle Davies has stepped into a rotation that's had as many as four starters on the DL and has been better than league-average. Meanwhile, Schuerholz made one of the few notable deals at a quiet trading deadline, acquiring gas-throwing reliever Kyle Farnsworth for Roman Colon and Zach Miner, two live arms who may or may not amount to much in Detroit and points beyond.

Trading tomorrow's talent for a shot at today's pennant is a common strategy, of course, and it's worth a closer look to see how a given team fares in those exchanges. Last summer, as the trading deadline approached, I examined the track record of the Yankees front office in light of the previous year's Brandon Claussen-for-Aaron Boone deal. Rather than be concerned with who the Yanks received in return or whether they "won" a particular trade based on some VORP- or WARP-related accounting, I focused on another issue: how well did the players they traded turn out?

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June 30, 2004 12:00 am

Can Of Corn: Triple-A All-Stars

0

Dayn Perry

Today, I'm wrapping up my series on level-by-level minor league All-Stars. I've already put together my Low-A Team, High-A Team and Double-A Team. This time, in what's bound to come as a surprise, I'm going to look at my Triple-A All-Stars. Putting together a Triple-A team is a bit of a challenge given the criteria I've set. I'm looking for a blend of performance and genuine prospect status. Triple-A, as you probably know, is fertile ground for retreads and Quadruple-A types, which provides a fairly low level-wide signal-to-noise ratio in terms of prospects. So, for all their merits, you'll see no Lou Colliers, Joe Vitiellos or Mike Colangelos here. What you will see are the best prospects who have spent most of the season at Triple-A and haven't exhausted their prospect status in recent seasons. Before the money runs out...

Putting together a Triple-A team is a bit of a challenge given the criteria I've set. I'm looking for a blend of performance and genuine prospect status. Triple-A, as you probably know, is fertile ground for retreads and Quadruple-A types, which provides a fairly low level-wide signal-to-noise ratio in terms of prospects. So, for all their merits, you'll see no Lou Colliers, Joe Vitiellos or Mike Colangelos here. What you will see are the best prospects who have spent most of the season at Triple-A and haven't exhausted their prospect status in recent seasons. Before the money runs out...

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May 29, 2001 12:00 am

Touring the Minors

0

Keith Scherer

This week's tour takes us through the Mariners' and Astros' farm systems.

Seattle Mariners: Early-Season Organizational Review

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Each edition of the annual Baseball Prospectus covers more than 1,600 players, with full Davenport Translations and comments. Even with that kind of blanket coverage, every year players who miss the cut for the book make the cut in spring training, finding their way onto major-league rosters.

Our staff has collected DTs and player comments for just about everyone who made an Opening Day roster but wasn't in BP2K1. We've also included updated Wilton projections for hitters. Enjoy!

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April 12, 2001 12:00 am

Touring the Minors

0

Keith Scherer

Davenport Translations: ERA BA OBP SLG Pacific Coast League 4.84 .277 .348 .435

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Monday's article by Keith Scherer caused a few people to inquire about a particular statement, that the International League was clearly the top minor league. The statement was inspired by a chart in Baseball Prospectus 2001, in the introduction to the Davenport Translations.

Given the level of response to Scherer's use--correct use, in this case--of the material, I thought it would be useful to explain the conclusion a bit more deeply. The evidence is based on how players do who move from one league to another, using Equivalent Averages, adjusted for league and park, but without any adjustments for "difficulty."

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March 5, 2001 12:00 am

Lost in America

0

Keith Scherer

Following the 2000 season, the minor leagues underwent dozens of changes. Organizations changed their affiliations within leagues, moved their affiliates from one league to another, and jumped and bumped teams between levels. Along with the reconfigurations, there will be several new parks throughout the minor leagues. What follows below is a delineation of the changes, along with an attempt to anticipate what effects those changes might have.

Most of the changes occurred at the lower levels. At any level, the talent matters more than the park or league. That's especially true for the low minors, where the change is so rapid, the talent so immature, and the organizational goals so much more focused on development than statistical results. This article doesn't spend much space addressing changes at the rookie or short-season levels. But all the changes are worth noting, both to help track player movement and to better analyze drastic changes in player performance.

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Glen Barker PS Age 28 Year Team Lge AB H DB TP HR BB R RBI SB CS Out BA OBA SA EQA EQR Defense 1996 Fayettvl SAL 138 31 0 0 1 10 9 7 6 3 110 .225 .277 .246 .182 8 36-OF 113 1996 Jacksnvl Sou 121 15 0 1 0 5 3 3 3 2 108 .124 .159 .140 **** -3 40-OF 107 1996 Toledo Int 79 16 1 1 0 8 6 3 4 4 67 .203 .276 .241 .176 4 21-OF 117 1997 Lakeland Fla 56 14 1 0 1 4 6 4 3 1 43 .250 .300 .321 .223 5 1997 Jacksnvl Sou 254 53 4 1 4 21 19 15 10 5 206 .209 .269 .280 .191 16 63-OF 102 1997 Toledo Int 48 8 0 0 1 4 3 2 4 2 42 .167 .231 .229 .159 2 1998 Jacksnvl Sou 453 105 17 2 5 37 43 32 17 5 353 .232 .290 .311 .214 37 108-OF 116 1999 Houston NL 412 90 11 2 6 33 44 32 20 7 329 .218 .276 .299 .214 35

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