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Reviewing the most egregious starts of the last decade and a half, with an assist from Old Hoss Radbourn.

On Tuesday, 23-year-old Zack Wheeler threw a career-high 118 pitches. That’s not all that many pitches, except that they were crowded into just 4 ⅓ innings; all but 33 of those 118 pitches were thrown with men on base, and all of the innings were extended:

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Do starters who are worked hard in college get injured more often in the minors and majors?

Most of our writers didn't enter the world sporting an @baseballprospectus.com address; with a few exceptions, they started out somewhere else. In an effort to up your reading pleasure while tipping our caps to some of the most illuminating work being done elsewhere on the internet, we'll be yielding the stage once a week to the best and brightest baseball writers, researchers and thinkers from outside of the BP umbrella. If you'd like to nominate a guest contributor (including yourself), please drop us a line.

Dustin Palmateer once played division III junior college baseball, finishing with a career batting average below the Mendoza Line. He now writes about the game. You can reach him via email.

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May 18, 2012 3:00 am

Raising Aces: All About Injuries

20

Doug Thorburn

What are the real mechanical precursors of pitcher injury? And what is the real lesson of Mark Prior's injury history?

Pitching mechanics are a bit like long-snappers in football, in the sense that we hear about them only when something goes horribly wrong. Mechanics rarely enter the discussion until a pitcher gets hurt, but when an ace succumbs to injury, the village folk grab their torches and pitchforks to go on the hunt for blame.

Experience has taught me that there is rarely an isolated cause for a pitcher's injury, with confounding variables that include mechanics, conditioning, workloads, genetics, and plain old luck. The pitching delivery is a high-performance machine, with a multitude of moving parts that must work efficiently in concert for the system to perform at peak levels, and any weak link in the system can lead to a breakdown.

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UTK took a look at the principles in the deal and comes away wondering if anyone asked the doctors about this.

With reports flying of an impending deal involving Bartolo Colon and Brad Penny, UTK took a look at the principles in the deal and comes away wondering if anyone asked the doctors about this.

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PAP Q&A

PAP^3 is the name for the new system for measuring pitcher abuse via pitch counts introduced in Baseball Prospectus 2001. Though it shares a similar name and goal with a system previously introduced by Rany Jazayerli, it was developed independently, and replaces the older system.

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May 22, 2002 10:57 am

Prospectus Feature: Analyzing PAP (Part Two)

0

Keith Woolner

Before claiming any success for any measure in predicting injury, we must fundamentally recognize that any PAP-style metric will be positively correlated with raw pitch counts. Pitchers with high pitch count totals will tend to have high PAP totals. If a PAP function provides no additional insight into which pitchers will be injured that pitch count totals alone, there is no reason to add the added complexity of a PAP system to our sabermetric arsenal.

 The following article, written by Keith Woolner with Rany Jazayerli, appeared in Baseball Prospectus 2001.

 

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May 21, 2002 9:00 pm

Prospectus Feature: Analyzing PAP (Part One)

0

Keith Woolner

There are two related effects we are interested in studying. The original intent of PAP was to ascertain whether a pitcher is at risk of injury or permanent reduction in effectiveness due to repeated overwork. And in particular, does PAP (or any similar formula) provide more insight into that risk that simple pitch counts alone?

 The following article, written by Keith Woolner with Rany Jazayerli, appeared in Baseball Prospectus 2001.

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July 11, 2000 12:00 am

Clarifying PAP

0

Rany Jazayerli

It has now been more than two years since we created Pitcher Abuse Points to standardize the measurement of pitcher workloads. By and large, we have been more successful at that goal than we had any reason to expect. Some people in baseball now agree with the notion that limiting pitch counts in an attempt to keep pitchers healthy is one of the most important topics in baseball. Then again, many more people think we're full of crap. Or, to quote Bruce Jenkins of the San Francisco Chronicle:

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Two years ago, when we first introduced Pitcher Abuse Points, pitch counts were still shrouded in a veil of mystery. They were available, mind you, but they were squirreled away at the bottom of box scores, and rarely ventured from their hiding place to appear in game summaries or in televised accounts of the game. Columnists never brought them to our attention. Livan Hernandez could throw 140 pitches in utter obscurity.

Today, ESPN tracks Rick Ankiel's pitch counts the way CNBC tracks the NASDAQ.

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