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Articles Tagged Injuries 

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04-13

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Caught Looking: The Twice-TJ'd Club
by
Michael Wenz

04-01

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1

Prospectus Feature: Save the Person, Save the Arm
by
Eric Garcia McKinley

01-21

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8

Fifth Column: Too Easy to Say 'Just Play Baseball'
by
Michael Baumann

01-06

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6

Five to Watch: Injury Risks Worth Taking in 2016
by
Matt Collins

09-21

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9

Rubbing Mud: The Slide Rule
by
Matthew Trueblood

07-10

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1

Weekly Wrap: July 10, 2015
by
Craig Goldstein

06-24

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11

Fantasy Freestyle: The Injured Starter Market
by
J.P. Breen

05-07

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The BP Wayback Machine: The Concussion Discussion
by
Corey Dawkins and Marc Normandin

03-05

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17

Rubbing Mud: A Solution Does Not Exist
by
Matthew Trueblood

02-06

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8

Moonshot: Using PITCHf/x to Predict Hitter Injuries
by
Robert Arthur

09-19

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6

Moonshot: Detecting the Best Medicine
by
Robert Arthur

08-06

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10

Moonshot: Troy Tulowitzki and the Brittle Bones Hypotheses
by
Robert Arthur

07-18

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3

Working the Count: The Tanaka Postmortem
by
Noah Woodward

07-08

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1

Moonshot: Survival of the Fittest: Position Players
by
Robert Arthur

07-01

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10

Overthinking It: The Nationals' Non-Problem
by
Ben Lindbergh

07-01

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4

Baseball Therapy: Do Some Pitches Do More Damage Than Others?
by
Russell A. Carleton

07-01

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Moonshot: Survival of the Fittest: Pitchers
by
Robert Arthur

06-17

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7

Baseball Therapy: What High School Has to Do with Tommy John
by
Russell A. Carleton

06-03

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5

Moonshot: What Makes Position Players Injury Prone?
by
Robert Arthur

05-30

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3

Working the Count: The Five-Day Pitcher Injury Zone
by
Noah Woodward

05-30

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16

Baseball Therapy: The Hard Part About Preventing Tommy John Surgeries
by
Russell A. Carleton

05-28

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13

The Lineup Card: 13 Pitcher Injuries We Wish We Could Undo
by
Baseball Prospectus

05-23

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9

Overthinking It: How to Prevent Future Prince Fielders
by
Ben Lindbergh

05-23

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3

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 456: The Cost of Concealing Injuries
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

05-22

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BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 455: Stan Conte on What We Need to Know About Pitcher Injuries
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

05-20

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10

Working the Count: Jose Fernandez Flirts with the Injury Zone
by
Noah Woodward

05-16

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13

Raising Aces: The Injury Puzzle
by
Doug Thorburn

05-15

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3

Overthinking It: Have Tommy John Surgery, Sign Long-Term Contract?
by
Ben Lindbergh

05-13

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BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 448: Why Can't We Have a Healthy Jose Fernandez?
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

05-13

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21

Skewed Left: How Much Losing Jose Fernandez Hurts
by
Zachary Levine

04-29

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11

Baseball Therapy: Do Innings Limits Work?
by
Russell A. Carleton

04-25

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8

Overthinking It: Matt Moore, Ivan Nova, and the Injury Zone
by
Ben Lindbergh

04-16

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16

The Lineup Card: Eight Notable Early-Season Injuries
by
Baseball Prospectus

04-10

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7

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 425: The Costliest Injuries Suffered So Far
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

04-08

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10

Moonshot: Miguel Cabrera and the Bearable Heaviness of Being
by
Robert Arthur

03-24

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5

Baseball Therapy: The Complicated Recoveries of Aroldis Chapman and Salvador Perez
by
Russell A. Carleton

01-29

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4

Painting the Black: Blistery Science Theater
by
R.J. Anderson

10-10

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16

Pebble Hunting: The Season in Pain
by
Sam Miller

09-03

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4

Baseball ProGUESTus: A Closer Look at College Pitch Counts and Injuries
by
Dustin Palmateer

08-28

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14

Baseball Therapy: Matt Harvey and the Increased Risk from a Few Extra Innings
by
Russell A. Carleton

08-27

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BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 274: Mourning Matt Harvey/A Player Poll About A-Rod
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

08-06

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13

Baseball Therapy: Prioritizing the Pitcher's Health
by
Russell A. Carleton

07-24

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2

BP Unfiltered: A Dodgers Fan in Denial Reads Matt Kemp Injury Updates
by
Ben Lindbergh

07-20

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Daily Roundup: Around the League: July 20, 2013
by
Clint Chisam

04-30

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3

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 192: Stephen Strasburg's New Injury Scare/The Underhyped Manny Machado
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

04-24

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5

Daily Roundup: Around the League: April 24, 2013
by
Clint Chisam

04-16

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6

BP Announcements: Historical Pitcher DL Data at Baseball Prospectus
by
Corey Dawkins

04-13

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Daily Roundup: Around the League: April 13, 2013
by
Clint Chisam

04-11

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6

Daily Roundup: Around the League: April 11, 2013
by
Clint Chisam

04-10

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4

Daily Roundup: Around the League: April 10, 2013
by
Clint Chisam

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A study focuses on 26 pitchers who underwent revision Tommy John surgery.

Caught Looking examines articles from the academic literature relevant to baseball and statistical analysis. This review examines a recent article from the Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery on Tommy John revision surgeries.

In 1974, Dr. Frank Jobe performed ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction surgery on Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher Tommy John. At the age of 31, John was 13-3 with a 2.59 ERA in the midst of his 12th big-league season when he tore the UCL in his left elbow. This marked the end of his season, and for everyone who had previously torn a UCL, it had marked the end of their career. The procedure performed by Dr. Jobe was seen as a longshot, but it was a longshot that paid off. John missed the 1975 season, but returned in 1976 and went on to pitch in the majors for 14 more seasons that included two runner-up finishes for the Cy Young Award.

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What to take from Jeff Passan's excellent new book, The Arm.

Jeff Passan’s valuable new book, The Arm: Inside the Billion-Dollar Mystery of the Most Valuable Commodity in Sports—out Tuesday from HarperCollins—is an attempt to shed light on one of the most confounding dramas in contemporary baseball: the so-called “epidemic” of elbow injuries among pitchers. The thrust of the book is revealed in its final pages, when Passan indicates that he hopes his deep dive into pitching and arm health is “something that can help a lot of people.” The motivating prompt for this goal is the nettlesome question: “How can we keep the arm healthy?”

Passan’s investigation is primarily in reference to the rising number of torn ligaments and subsequent Tommy John surgeries among professionals and amateurs. In brief, the book is about a problem, and its aim is to identify solutions. It does not offer any single solution, but that’s not a failure of the book. On the contrary, it’s a testament to the ambitiousness and timeliness of the question. Instead of a magic bullet, Passan reveals that the only way to mitigate arm injuries among pitchers is to effect a cultural shift in the way arms are viewed and used from the lowest to highest levels of competition. The way to do that is to, in a sense, re-attach “the arm” to the human athletes to whom they belong, from youth to professional baseball.

There are numerous correlative causes that lead to elbow injuries among pitchers; however, the only indisputable explanation is the mere act of pitching. To add a finer shade to this maxim, overpitching on macro and micro scales—year-round competition among youth and an emphasis on velocity—are the root causes of elbow injuries. These are the types of concerns that the parents of Harley Harrington, a young pitcher Passan profiles as one of many human stories that accompany his deep dive into arm health, have to be aware of. One of the most fundamental solutions to the problem of pitcher injuries among professionals, Passan posits, is to enforce regulations in the frequency of competition among the industry of youth baseball in which Harrington might soon be pressured to participate.

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Why baseball isn't so convenient an alternative to football's head trauma risks.

It’s a ritual now for football fans: Gravely watching one of their former heroes talk about how broken his life has become after years of head trauma. In a story that ran on Tuesday, former Steelers receiver and Super Bowl XL hero Antwaan Randle El told J. Brady McCollough of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette that he has memory losses and sometimes has trouble going down stairs because of brain injuries he suffered playing football. Randle-El is 36 years old.

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January 6, 2016 6:00 am

Five to Watch: Injury Risks Worth Taking in 2016

6

Matt Collins

These players have spent considerable time licking their wounds of late, but they could pay off in the coming season.

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September 21, 2015 6:00 am

Rubbing Mud: The Slide Rule

9

Matthew Trueblood

Should there be a rule change to minimize injuries from takeout slides?

If the groundball goes to shortstop, we're not having this conversation, because second basemen are carried across the back half of second base when they receive a flip from the shortstop to start a double play, whereas shortstops receiving the throw from the second baseman are carried across the front half. If Jung-ho Kang jumps as he prepares to fire the ball on to first, we're not having this conversation, because Chris Coghlan's flailing, sidewinding takeout slide just clips him and knocks him harmlessly into the dirt, instead of shredding his left leg (which, instead of being airborne, was planted in that dirt).

But because Kang came flying across the front half of second base and was blown up by the hard-sliding Coghlan, ending his season and damaging the Pirates' chances of playing deep into October, we have to have the conversation. The columns calling for a rule prohibiting takeout slides of any kind have already begun. The question is whether those columns are well founded, or just the knee-jerk reaction to an unfortunate incident.

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July 10, 2015 6:00 am

Weekly Wrap: July 10, 2015

1

Craig Goldstein

Greg Bird and Jorge Polanco are up, David Dahl is rehabbing, and more prospect news for the week.

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June 24, 2015 6:00 am

Fantasy Freestyle: The Injured Starter Market

11

J.P. Breen

Sizing up the arms getting ready to return from the DL.

As we approach the dog days of the baseball season, fantasy owners nearing contention will be seeking to improve their rosters, just like real-life organizations. However, the former have the added benefit of a waiver wire that’s often chock full of injured players who have been neglected or forgotten. Acquiring a key starter almost ready to return from the DL can often upgrade one’s roster nearly as much as a midseason trade, and it doesn’t cost anything but a roster spot.

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Exploring the effects of concussions and the implications of the seven-day disabled list.

On Wednesday, after making an exceptional play on Tuesday, George Springer joined Alcides Escobar on the 7-Day concussion DL. Four years ago, Corey Dawkins and Marc Normandin wrote about the implications of the 7-Day DL. This article originally ran on April 19, 2011.

Hitting a baseball isn't the most difficult activity in sports—changing a long-standing culture is. For many years, a player was not officially diagnosed with a concussion unless there was a loss of consciousness. That started to change a few decades ago, but the physiological causes and long-term effects of concussions still were not fully understood. Thus, practices among players and non-medical personnel remained static.

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It has been a busy week for Tommy John hand-wringing. The problem isn't that implementing solutions will be challenging, but that those solutions don't exist.

One year ago, Cory Luebke was two weeks post-op, the first and only major-league hurler who had undergone Tommy John surgery in 2014, and the only one, in fact, since Matt Harvey hit the surgeon’s slab in October 2013. Within a month, though—in the space between March 18th and Opening Day—there would be six more big-league arms sliced open: Luke Hochevar, Kris Medlen, Brandon Beachy, Patrick Corbin, Jarrod Parker and Bruce Rondon. After the season began, the bloodbath continued more or less unabated. The spring would claim the ulnar collateral ligaments of, among others, Matt Moore, Jose Fernandez and Martin Perez. The threat had become ubiquitous.

The anniversary of that dam break has coincided with a series of tangentially related, not-quite-converging conversations about pitcher injuries. First, an Orange County Register feature by Pedro Moura explored the Dodgers’ new habit of stockpiling pitchers with serious or lengthy injury histories. The piece delved into the team’s balancing of the risk and reward those pitchers offer, and (in greater depth) into the club’s growing, large-scale commitment to both biomechanical analysis and long-term, data-driven research into injury prevention. Dodgers President Andrew Friedman said, “I would contend that any kind of advantage in injury prevention is significant,” which qualifies as candor for him.

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February 6, 2015 6:00 am

Moonshot: Using PITCHf/x to Predict Hitter Injuries

8

Robert Arthur

PITCHf/x data is able to make a significant contribution to injury prediction.

Injuries, I think we can all agree, are a deplorable scourge on baseball. They remove our favorite players indiscriminately from the field, or ruin their effectiveness. They can take teams that are great on paper and reduce them to smoldering piles of ash (see the Texas Rangers, 2014). Even though injuries appear random, the result of bad luck and stochastic variation, they are (to a limited extent) predictable. Based on prior research, it turns out that commonsense factors can predispose position players to injury.

In particular, my last foray into the subject found that age as well as the number of days missed in the past three seasons could provide a reliable prediction into how many days each position player would miss in the coming year. However, the accuracy of these predictions was modest, and required extensive information from prior years. It would be desirable to make further improvements upon these injury predictions, but in the absence of other possible sources of information, prospects seemed slim.

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September 19, 2014 6:00 am

Moonshot: Detecting the Best Medicine

6

Robert Arthur

Can we figure out which teams are best at preventing injuries?

At the team level, injuries are as mysterious as they can be crippling. The Texas Rangers are suffering a whirlwind of pitcher injuries that threatens to break records and has certainly been one of the primary causes of their disappointing season. Meanwhile, teams full of aged veterans like the Yankees and Phillies have somehow managed to evade their fair share, albeit without benefiting very much.

Differences like these suggest asking whether some teams are better at limiting injuries than others. Ben Lindbergh (with the help of Russell Carleton) tried to tackle this issue a few days ago in the context of the Pirates' remarkable run of injury prevention. They found little detectable signal of any team having an ability to reduce injuries.

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August 6, 2014 11:09 pm

Moonshot: Troy Tulowitzki and the Brittle Bones Hypotheses

10

Robert Arthur

Are injury prone players actually prone to injuries?

In a twist of stunning unpredictability, Troy Tulowitzki is injured. Like the year before, and the year before that, Tulo is spending some time on the 15-day disabled list, after missing a handful of games for sprains and strains earlier in the season. Troy’s annual trip breaks up what was easily (on a rate basis) the best season of his career.

A glance at Tulowitzki’s injury history reveals a voluminous catalog of the many ways baseball players can be hurt. This year, Tulowitzki suffered a hip flexor strain. Last year, Tulowitzki had broken ribs. The year before, a torn muscle which necessitated surgery. Other injuries on his record include maladies in his foot, ankle, and hand.

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