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Articles Tagged Ballparks 

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The Marlins' position players are fed up by their ballpark's dimensions, and Ozzie Guillen is fed up with them. Who's making the most sense

After my last Bill Veeck blowout, I planned to leave my copy of Veeck as in Wreck alone for a while, but current events keep making me pull it back off the shelf. This time, the impetus was Ozzie Guillen's recent complaints about his players' complaints about the dimensions of Marlins Park.

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While these foods aren't mainstays at the ballpark, they certainly should be

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As the scoreboard programmer for the Trenton Thunder in their inaugural season (1994), one of my daily tasks was to enter in player averages from the compiled statistics faxed to us from the Howe News Bureau. Before I did this, there was one statistic that my fellow press-box compatriots and I craved above all us: the attendance standings. Every day, we wanted to see if we were beating the other two Eastern League franchises with new stadiums: the Portland Sea Dogs and the Bowie Baysox. The memory of these daily quests for the attendance standings recently got me thinking about the drivers of baseball attendance.

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March 13, 2008 12:00 am

Prospectus Hit and Run: Running Afoul

0

Jay Jaffe

Has the perceived decrease in foul territory brought by the new stadium boom contributed to the surge in home runs over the past two decades?

Last time around, after discussing how the baseball itself may have changed in a manner that helped to boost home run rates over the past two decades, I took a look at the myth of the shrinking ballpark. To recap, the notion that the stadium construction boom that's taken place over the past 20 years has left us with a game full of bandboxes is actually a false one, at least when it comes to fence distances:

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February 22, 2008 12:00 am

Prospectus Hit and Run: Having a Ball

1

Jay Jaffe

Cork and rubber, not HGH and steroids, might be responsible for baseball's home run increases, which certainly aren't due to smaller park dimensions.

Amid the ongoing swirl of steroid stories this past week, I came across a bit of research that had me dusting off something I wrote three years ago. In 2005, I contributed a chapter to Will Carroll's The Juice (which arrived more or less on the eve of baseball's day in front of Congress in 2005), which analyzed some alternative explanations to the theory that steroids had been responsible for the home run increases which typified baseball after 1992. I examined the effects that expansion, interleague play, the changing strike zone, and new ballparks may have had on the rising homer rates, and wound up concluding at the time that none of them were likely to have driven the surge.

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Ranging across a couple of old and new themes, explaining that there's something about the weather, and Pythagoras can rock steady.

"All of us could take a lesson from the weather. It pays no attention to criticism."
--Unknown


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Evaluating the strike zone, the umpires, and some large-scale issues with a tremendous new tool.

"Begin at the beginning and go on till you come to the end: then stop."
--Lewis Carroll (1832 - 1898), Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, said by the King to the White Rabbit


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November 27, 2006 12:00 am

The Ledger Domain: Cisco Field

0

Maury Brown

Maury takes you through what to expect from the new Fremont ballpark.

Ballpark architecture is functional art. The design of a baseball park has to be something more than just a work that presents an emotional response. It also has to serve its main purpose, creating a playing area for the game of baseball and seating for the fans. Since the construction of Orioles Park at Camden Yards in 1992, to some extent the design of ballparks has been focused on the emotional response to ballparks from our past-they're designed to remind us of a 'golden era' in the past.

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One man's case for a pair of the game's off-field giants.

Today, I'm making the case for two executives who have been passed over in years prior for the Hall. At the same time, I'd like to ask how these two individuals could be absent from Cooperstown in the first place. Both men altered MLB's landscape forever. Both changed the conventional thinking in MLB-both in terms of labor, and in terms of business. Both men directed their respective constituencies, either directly or indirectly. Both men are iconic.

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March 7, 2005 12:00 am

Fantasy Focus: Fantasy Feng-Shui

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Erik Siegrist

Taking park factors to the next level.

But a player's home ballpark only applies to half their games. What about the other half? Road games never enter into the equation. Conventional wisdom says that a team's away games are fairly evenly distributed, and the aggregate impact of all those different road parks will even out.

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April 30, 2003 12:00 am

Prospectus Today: Owning Up to the Problem

0

Joe Sheehan

One of the baseball stories I managed to catch while on my vacation was Bud Selig's announcement that he would not pursue a new contract after his current one expires. This means that his tenure as commissioner--one that began with him taking the job on an interim basis a decade ago--would end in December 2006. It's no secret that I've disagreed with how Selig has run the game, in particular his anti-marketing strategies in pursuit of a favorable labor agreement. The short-term gain of a Collective Bargaining Agreement that benefited management wasn't worth the years of damage Selig and his cohort did with their relentless bashing of what was a healthy industry. Declines in attendance, TV ratings and revenue, as well as fiascoes like contraction and the Expos situation, can largely be traced to Selig's efforts to convince people that baseball wasn't viable, wasn't competitive, and wasn't worth their time. With a new CBA in place, though, and Selig setting his own exit date, it's time to look forward and see what can be done between now and the end of 2006. What positive steps can and should be taken to ensure that Selig leaves the game in better shape than it's in right now? Every now and then this year, I'm going to pick an aspect of the game and lay out what I think should be done to improve it. While I'll isolate one level of the game in each column, the ideas I'm presenting need to be viewed as a whole, as one big plan to get baseball where it needs to be. I'll start with the game's ownership, because I think everything grows from that. Over the past decade, baseball has brought in a number of owners, both individual and corporate, that have had a net negative effect on the game. From grandstanding over taxpayer-funded ballparks and inflated claims of losses, to taking short-term approaches in a long-term industry, the most recent set of "lords of the realm" have been a disaster.

It's no secret that I've disagreed with how Selig has run the game, in particular his anti-marketing strategies in pursuit of a favorable labor agreement. The short-term gain of a Collective Bargaining Agreement that benefited management wasn't worth the years of damage Selig and his cohort did with their relentless bashing of what was a healthy industry. Declines in attendance, TV ratings and revenue, as well as fiascoes like contraction and the Expos situation, can largely be traced to Selig's efforts to convince people that baseball wasn't viable, wasn't competitive, and wasn't worth their time.

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It may seem that the Junior Circuit has always been the league of inflated offense, as a result of--take your pick--weaker pitching, cozier ballparks, weaker pitching, smaller strike zones, and weaker pitching. That's not the case. Prior to the installation of the DH in 1973, the two leagues had virtually identical offensive levels. If anything, the NL was the more offensive of the two.

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