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For some readers who use Internet Explorer, the existence of a "Post Reply" button on comments must have seemed rather confusing, as it didn't do anything when clicked, and replies had to be entered using the box below all the other comments.  From the best we can tell, this issue cropped up when IE8 was released, so it's been around for a very long time (as Internet time goes).  

Now it has been fixed.  

Below is a screen capture of what you should see now when you click "Post Reply" to a specific comment.  

 


If you're not seeing this, please try a hard refresh first (For all versions of Internet Explorer on Windows, either holding down the Ctrl key while pressing the Refresh button or else pressing Ctrl-F5 works.)  This will load the new JavaScript that is required.  You do have JavaScript enabled, right?

Instructions on enabling JavaScript from support.google.com:

Internet Explorer (9.0)

  1. Select Tools from the top menu.

  2. Choose Internet Options.

  3. Click on the Security tab.

  4. Click on Custom Level.

  5. Scroll down until you see the section labeled 'Scripting.'

  6. Under 'Active Scripting,' select Enable and click OK.

 

 

 

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doctawojo
8/11
Here, here's a comment you can try to reply to for testing purposes.
Oleoay
8/13
*tests from work on IE* Yep, it works. Funny thing is I had figured it was some error on my work's side.
spider35
8/11
Who uses Internet Explorer in 2012?
bornyank1
8/11
Over 30 percent of people who use internet browsers! The percentage is probably lower among BP readers, but still a significant chunk.
MikeLHenderson
8/11
Sad to say, I do. On my systems IE renders Google Calendar better than Chrome(!) or Firefox. Looks like the "Post Reply" and rating+/- gadgets are working OK now. Thanks.
Oleoay
8/11
I use it from work. I imagine other companies, like mine, control what you can download and install. I had problems replying in-line to comments or +/-'ing for the last 6+ months but I was able to get Chrome authorized on my computer and that helped.
frampton
8/12
Agreed, I'm sure there are other large organizations (like the University of California, where I work) that strictly limit non-IE browsers, based on security concerns (however valid or invalid). I like the story (which may well be apocryphal) that, at one of Hillary Clinton's first staff meetings at State, someone asked whether they might use Firefox, and the room erupted in applause. Clinton said she'd look into it -- I don't know how it played out, but would be interested to learn (and forward to my IT department!).
Oleoay
8/12
Well, not just security concerns, but compatibility concerns and business reasons. I imagine many companies buy a "Microsoft bundle" license at high volumes to get a discount on things like Windows, Office, etc. and "free" things like IE would be a part of that. Then, they just mass-install the bundle so that everything on a business computer is compatible. If you start adding other browsers into the picture, sometimes the add-ons and/or the struggle among the programs for RAM just causes headaches.
Michael
8/12
I'm wondering whether this also fixes the inability to +/- a comment from IE8. I'll find out when I'm back at work on Monday since I use Firefox from home.
mcquown
8/12
Yes, it does.
Michael
8/13
Thanks. I agree that the +/- feature in IE8 is fixed.