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Articles Tagged Yankee Stadium 

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05-28

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9

Skewed Left: The Real Future Yankees
by
Zachary Levine

04-16

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20

Overthinking It: Man in the Box
by
Ben Lindbergh

07-11

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5

One-Hoppers: No One Else In New York Is Allowed to Make This Turn: Bob Sheppard (1910-2010)
by
Jay Jaffe

10-30

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13

Prospectus Hit and Run: A Night to Remember
by
Jay Jaffe

05-24

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80

Prospectus Idol Entry: Baseball Prospectus Basics: Park Factors
by
Brian Cartwright

04-03

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29

Out at the Ballpark
by
Neil deMause

09-22

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29

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Decline and Fall of Yankee Stadium
by
Jay Jaffe

09-22

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21

Prospectus Today: The Long Farewell
by
Joe Sheehan

09-22

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0

The Week in Quotes: September 15-21
by
Alex Carnevale

09-22

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4

The Last of the Last
by
Derek Jacques

07-24

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0

Lies, Damned Lies: Shrinking the Ballpark
by
Nate Silver

07-21

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The Week in Quotes: Week of July 14-20
by
Alex Carnevale

04-02

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0

The First Last
by
Derek Jacques

10-11

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0

Schrodinger's Bat: On Atmosphere, Probability, and Prediction
by
Dan Fox

04-13

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0

Prospectus Matchups: The Masses Rejoice!
by
Jim Baker

04-03

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0

Prospectus Game of the Week: Tampa Bay Devil Rays at New York Yankees, April 2, 2007
by
Derek Jacques

08-21

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0

The Ledger Domain: Contents Under Pressure
by
Maury Brown

02-16

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Bronx Bummer
by
Neil deMause

01-31

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0

Amazin' Mail
by
Neil deMause

01-30

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Financing A New Yankee Stadium
by
Andrew Zimbalist

02-10

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0

Crooked Numbers: More Time in the Park
by
James Click

08-01

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0

The Evil Empire Strikes Back
by
Neil deMause

05-05

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0

The Return of Swamp Thing
by
Neil deMause

04-20

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0

If It's Tuesday...
by
Neil deMause

11-17

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The Stadium Game
by
Neil deMause

10-16

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Breaking Balls: Ghosts of Pinstripes Past
by
Derek Zumsteg

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April 2, 2008 12:00 am

The First Last

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Derek Jacques

The final season of play at the House That Ruth Built kicked off a day later than expected.

On Monday, what was to be Yankee Stadium's first-ever March game was canceled when the weather forecast didn't promise that the Yankees and Blue Jays could get in the requisite five innings for an official game. While this led to a fair amount of grumbling and booing by the fans who'd trekked out in a cold drizzle to catch the 2008 opener, it couldn't be argued that the 30-hour postponement didn't make for better baseball-playing and -watching conditions. The rains that assailed New York City off and on overnight and throughout the day on Tuesday gave way to perfect spring conditions in the evening: sixty-odd degrees and dry at game time.

The big story of the night was the historic final Opening Day of the House That Ruth Built, one of a litany of lasts that will run at least through September 21 against the Orioles (the Yankees' final scheduled regular season home game) and perhaps be stretched even farther should the Bronx Bombers manage to make it to the playoffs for the 14th straight year. We can look forward to these "historic" markers growing increasingly absurd as the year wears on, with broadcasters encouraging fans to catch the historic final midweek series against the Rays in July, and in August alerting us to Carl Pavano's historic final trip to the Yankee Stadium Trainers' Room. (I can almost hear Suzyn Waldman reverently running down the historic implications of the latter event: "Should Pavano somehow stay with the Yankees next year, and need a cortisone shot, or a rub down, or a precautionary X-Ray, it will be at the new Yankee Stadium.")

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Ranging across a couple of old and new themes, explaining that there's something about the weather, and Pythagoras can rock steady.

"All of us could take a lesson from the weather. It pays no attention to criticism."
--Unknown


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April 13, 2007 12:00 am

Prospectus Matchups: The Masses Rejoice!

0

Jim Baker

Jim has the results of his reader architecture poll, with a few surprising results, and a few not-so-surprising ones.

Today we're presenting the results of the sports venue architecture poll that was introduced in my column of March 16. I asked would-be participants to rank--from an architectural standpoint--their favorite existing sports venues (not just baseball), their favorite defunct or no-longer-extant venues, as well as their least favorite. For the favorite poll, points were given on a 7-5-3-2-1 basis. For the other two, it was 5-3-1. The point totals are in parentheses after the venue's name. Thanks to all of you who took the time to fill out a ballot.

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Derek takes in the Opening Day sights and captures the reigning mood among discontented fans in a packed Yankee Stadium.

Ever since they broke ground on the new Yankee Stadium-which is scheduled to open in April 2009-baseball fans have mentioned their desire to make a trip out to the old cathedral of baseball before its demise in two years. For those people, we'll start with a few guidelines for enjoying your Yankee Stadium experience.

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August 21, 2006 12:00 am

The Ledger Domain: Contents Under Pressure

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Maury Brown

Maury tracks unstable situations in South Florida, U.S. District Court, the Bronx, and his e-mail inbox.

Jeffrey Loria v. Jeffrey Loria

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February 16, 2006 12:00 am

Bronx Bummer

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Neil deMause

Neil deMause responds to Andrew Zimbalist and the Yankee Stadium financing debate.

Now that Zimbalist has issued his rebuttal, though, I'm glad for the opportunity to get to the bottom of the question of just who'd be paying the $1.8 billion tab to replace Yankee and Shea Stadiums. As I've been stressing for months now, it's not as straightforward a question as it sounds, what with the current craze for financing agreements that are more complex than the save rule.

As Zimbalist correctly observed on BP Radio, I'm a journalist, not an economist--though I do consult with economists and other sports business experts on a regular basis, to check both my reasoning and my Excel skills. That said, he's an economist, not a journalist, and may not have all the information on the nuances of the New York stadium deals. So I've spent the last couple of weeks digging through the public record, and the not-so-public record, to clear up the facts of the matter. The result is going to take a bit to explain and will delve in places into economic minutiae, but try to keep your eyes from glazing over for just the next few minutes--this is worth getting right, not just for the sake of New York taxpayers, but because it's an excellent lesson in the difficulties of ferreting out the true costs of modern stadium deals.

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January 31, 2006 12:00 am

Amazin' Mail

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Neil deMause

Neil deMause responds to some reader mail generated by his column on the proposed Mets stadium.

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January 30, 2006 12:00 am

Financing A New Yankee Stadium

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Andrew Zimbalist

Who pays for a new ballpark for the Yankees? Zimbalist breaks it down.

DeMause's sarcasm is unjustified, as are his estimates. Let me try to set the record straight. In my January 22 op-ed, I argued that after accounting for a $44 million tax break, the Yankees would be covering $756 million out of a total expense of $1.01 billion for the project. The balance of the project would be spent on infrastructure and covered by the public sector (city and state). Overall, the Yankees would be paying 75 percent of the total project costs.

In fact, because the state's contribution of $70 million for parking garages would be repaid from the parking receipts (or indirectly via a subcontracting deal), the public outlay would be lower. Furthermore, the city will be able to sell off memorabilia from the present Yankee Stadium, which will lower its net costs.

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February 10, 2005 12:00 am

Crooked Numbers: More Time in the Park

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James Click

Two hypotheses down, one to go: James Click tries again to divine truth from park factors.

Last week was spent checking to see if groundball pitchers were less affected by park factors than flyball pitchers are, a theory based on the assumption that park factors are based largely on outfield dimensions. This turned out not to be the case. Months before that was a little foray into park factors and baserunning attempt and success rates, checking to see if perhaps home teams got some of their inherent advantage from knowing how the ball bounces in their yard better than their visiting opponents do. Again, the theory did not pan out.

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If there's one thing George Steinbrenner has always been good at, it's hiding his money. Whether it's starting his own cable network to keep his broadcast revenue out of the reach of his fellow owners, as he did in 2002, or paying himself a "consulting fee" to negotiate his own cable contract, as he did in the 1980s, The Boss has always been at the cutting edge of creative accounting, helping him evade attempts by fellow owners to force him to share the bounty that comes from operating the most lucrative franchise in baseball. With his recently revealed plan to build a new $750 million stadium in the Bronx, though, Steinbrenner may have hit upon the biggest scam of his life.

With his recently revealed plan to build a new $750 million stadium in the Bronx, though, Steinbrenner may have hit upon the biggest scam of his life. If the early reports of the plan to tear down the House That Reggie Remodeled and replace it with a new one across the street are accurate, Steinbrenner looks to have figured out a way to build a new playpen for the Yankees, replete with extra luxury suites and food courts and all the other gewgaws that he's been slavering after for decades...and force baseball's other 29 teams to pay nearly half the cost.

(We now pause for Larry Lucchino's head to explode.)

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May 5, 2004 12:00 am

The Return of Swamp Thing

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Neil deMause

Leaving aside whether anyone should take seriously statements made by the guy who said he was moving the White Sox to Tampa, on the face of it the idea is a no-brainer. In terms of market size, the New York metro area is mind-bogglingly huge, dwarfing every other market in American baseball. Even splitting the market in half (OK, more like 65/35) the Yankees and Mets each have enough TV-rights firepower to blow away the rest of the league at free-agent time. You could put a team in Jersey and three more in Brooklyn, and each of the six area franchises would still have a larger populace to draw on than the likes of Milwaukee or Cincinnati.

"It's gone from something I didn't think was possible to something that actually could happen," Zoffinger told the Newark Star-Ledger. "Jerry Reinsdorf told me that baseball is interested in the Meadowlands because we are building a family entertainment center and bringing mass transit to the site."

Leaving aside whether anyone should take seriously statements made by the guy who said he was moving the White Sox to Tampa, on the face of it the idea is a no-brainer. In terms of market size, the New York metro area is mind-bogglingly huge, dwarfing every other market in American baseball. Even splitting the market in half (OK, more like 65/35) the Yankees and Mets each have enough TV-rights firepower to blow away the rest of the league at free-agent time. You could put a team in Jersey and three more in Brooklyn, and each of the six area franchises would still have a larger populace to draw on than the likes of Milwaukee or Cincinnati.

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April 20, 2004 12:00 am

If It's Tuesday...

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Neil deMause

Having just returned from my first game at Citizens Bank Park, a perfectly entertaining contest peppered with five home runs (including two by Placido Polanco plus a Pat Burrell shot that rattled the left-field foul pole) and ending in a 6-3 win for the minions of Bowa, I can say without hesitation that the one most memorable thing about the Phillies' new $458 million stadium is... ...hang on, give me a minute. I'll come up with something.

...hang on, give me a minute. I'll come up with something.

OK, for starters: It's not Veterans Stadium, the Phils' old home of the type routinely derided as a "concrete donut," which always seemed a libel on donuts, if not on concrete. Sitting across the street from the Vet's rubble, the new structure--some locals have suggested nicknaming it "The Vault", which seems like a reach--is first and foremost recognizably a baseball stadium, as witnessed by the several fans who were heard gasping on their way into the park: "Oooh! Grass!"

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