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Articles Tagged Wrigley Field 

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05-22

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4

Fantasy Freestyle: Travis Wood and the Winds of Wrigley
by
Andrew Koo

06-28

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15

Inside The Park: Why Can't We Just Leave Rizzo Alone?
by
Bradford Doolittle

12-08

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2

The BP Wayback Machine: Cardinals' Special Era Reaches a Crossroads
by
Bradford Doolittle

09-09

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11

Baseball ProGUESTus: Feline Intervention
by
Dan McQuade

05-12

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40

Span and Sain and Pray for Rain: Wrigley Field Forever?
by
Emma Span

02-06

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22

Wezen-Ball: Ferris Bueller's Day Off at Wrigley Field
by
Larry Granillo

12-08

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12

Inside The Park: Cardinals' Special Era Reaches a Crossroads
by
Bradford Doolittle

12-03

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22

Ahead in the Count: Home Sweet Home Advantage
by
Matt Swartz

07-02

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15

Prospectus Q&A: Mark Grace
by
David Laurila

05-11

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25

Changing Speeds: Retro Game Story: Cardinals at Cubs, 6/23/84
by
Ken Funck

05-24

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80

Prospectus Idol Entry: Baseball Prospectus Basics: Park Factors
by
Brian Cartwright

09-21

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2

Every Given Sunday: Winding Down
by
John Perrotto

10-11

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0

Schrodinger's Bat: On Atmosphere, Probability, and Prediction
by
Dan Fox

04-13

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0

Prospectus Matchups: The Masses Rejoice!
by
Jim Baker

11-27

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0

The Ledger Domain: Cisco Field
by
Maury Brown

11-20

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The Ledger Domain: The Sale of the Cubs
by
Maury Brown

06-14

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0

Schrodinger's Bat: A Kid (finally) Bids Fenway Hello
by
Dan Fox

03-07

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0

Fantasy Focus: Fantasy Feng-Shui
by
Erik Siegrist

08-16

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0

How Parks Affect Baserunning
by
James Click

05-17

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0

Ticket Price Survey
by
Doug Pappas

10-08

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0

Lies, Damned Lies: Working Late
by
Nate Silver

04-11

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0

Breaking Balls: Environmental Control
by
Derek Zumsteg

07-16

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0

Doctoring The Numbers: Defense in Colorado
by
Rany Jazayerli

08-14

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The Daily Prospectus: Park Effects
by
Joe Sheehan

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Ranging across a couple of old and new themes, explaining that there's something about the weather, and Pythagoras can rock steady.

"All of us could take a lesson from the weather. It pays no attention to criticism."
--Unknown


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April 13, 2007 12:00 am

Prospectus Matchups: The Masses Rejoice!

0

Jim Baker

Jim has the results of his reader architecture poll, with a few surprising results, and a few not-so-surprising ones.

Today we're presenting the results of the sports venue architecture poll that was introduced in my column of March 16. I asked would-be participants to rank--from an architectural standpoint--their favorite existing sports venues (not just baseball), their favorite defunct or no-longer-extant venues, as well as their least favorite. For the favorite poll, points were given on a 7-5-3-2-1 basis. For the other two, it was 5-3-1. The point totals are in parentheses after the venue's name. Thanks to all of you who took the time to fill out a ballot.

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November 27, 2006 12:00 am

The Ledger Domain: Cisco Field

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Maury Brown

Maury takes you through what to expect from the new Fremont ballpark.

Ballpark architecture is functional art. The design of a baseball park has to be something more than just a work that presents an emotional response. It also has to serve its main purpose, creating a playing area for the game of baseball and seating for the fans. Since the construction of Orioles Park at Camden Yards in 1992, to some extent the design of ballparks has been focused on the emotional response to ballparks from our past-they're designed to remind us of a 'golden era' in the past.

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November 20, 2006 12:00 am

The Ledger Domain: The Sale of the Cubs

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Maury Brown

Maury ponders the meaning of Jim Hendry's aggressive winter shopping for the pending sale of the game's lovable losers.

Within the industry, the Cubs are something of a mystery. They are the happy residents ensconced within the game's great jewel, Wrigley Field; they are seen by millions via WGN; they have money to burn. For all that, they've had little to show for it since 1908. They defy logic, spend like a drunken sailor on shore leave, pile up losing records, and nevertheless rake in revenues. Nowhere in professional sports has there been a team so consistently mediocre on the field, yet so consistently successful as a business over the last 20 years. The Cubs fly in the face of the conventional wisdom that winning fills the stands and losing keeps them empty.

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June 14, 2006 12:00 am

Schrodinger's Bat: A Kid (finally) Bids Fenway Hello

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Dan Fox

Dan enjoys a Sunday doubleheader in one of the game's shrines.

"It was beautiful. So many times because of a key play we get David or Manny to the plate and we feel like we have a chance. It's a tough way to win, but what a great swing."
--Red Sox manager Terry Francona commenting on the walk-off home run from David Ortiz last Sunday

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March 7, 2005 12:00 am

Fantasy Focus: Fantasy Feng-Shui

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Erik Siegrist

Taking park factors to the next level.

But a player's home ballpark only applies to half their games. What about the other half? Road games never enter into the equation. Conventional wisdom says that a team's away games are fairly evenly distributed, and the aggregate impact of all those different road parks will even out.

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August 16, 2004 12:00 am

How Parks Affect Baserunning

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James Click

Baseball teams show a consistent home-field advantage each season, with homer teams playing about .540 ball. Is that edge due to home teams doing a better job of taking the extra base thanks to familiarity with their environment? James Click breaks it down.

The source of this advantage is unknown. It's been suggested that local knowledge, how to hit or pitch better in a team's more familiar home park, is the key. Perhaps some of the home team's advantage lies in knowing the nuances of their particular ballpark, but applied in a different area. It's possible that home teams may be better baserunners, knowing better than their opponents which balls will allow them to take the extra base.

Before getting into whether or not a baserunning advantage is the result of a particular park, it's important to first establish that parks do affect the baserunning in a consistent manner from year to year. To determine if park factors for baserunning do exist, I'll look at three typical baserunning situations where the runner is faced with the choice to take the extra base or not: a runner on first during a single, a runner on first during a double, and a runner on second during a single. There are three possible outcomes to each baserunning event: the runner can take the base he's supposed to, the runner can take the extra base or the runner can be thrown out.

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May 17, 2004 12:00 am

Ticket Price Survey

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Doug Pappas

The fifth installment of the series tours the majors' largest division, the NL Central. Four of the six clubs in the division have moved into new ballparks since 2000, yet the one that's virtually sold out for the season is the one that plays in a 90-year-old park built for the Federal League. The Reds, Brewers and Pirates are Exhibits A, B and C for the proposition that a new ballpark doesn't ensure on-field success. Once again, I shopped the clubs' Web sites on MLB.com to see which seats a fan could hope to buy two or three weeks in advance, and how much a typical fan, or a typical family could expect to pay. That didn't work for the Cubs, who were sold out three months in advance, but everywhere else, typical fans are likely to pay less than Team Marketing Report's Fan Cost Index suggests they would.

The fifth installment of the series tours the majors' largest division, the NL Central. Four of the six clubs in the division have moved into new ballparks since 2000, yet the one that's virtually sold out for the season is the one that plays in a 90-year-old park built for the Federal League. The Reds, Brewers and Pirates are Exhibits A, B and C for the proposition that a new ballpark doesn't ensure on-field success.

Once again, I shopped the clubs' Web sites on MLB.com to see which seats a fan could hope to buy two or three weeks in advance, and how much a typical fan, or a typical family could expect to pay. That didn't work for the Cubs, who were sold out three months in advance, but everywhere else, typical fans are likely to pay less than Team Marketing Report's Fan Cost Index suggests they would.

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When the season begins each spring, the ivy on the outfield wall at Wrigley Field is not a lush green, but a vine-bare patch of brick and brown. Botany is not among my hobbies, and I do not know whether this condition results from some half-intentional negligence, or the natural distaste of Parthenocissus tricuspidata for the cool Midwestern spring. But in either event, the effect is unsettling: that feeling you get in a dream when you see a place familiar but vaguely and profoundly incomplete. That was the feeling I had on Friday night when I walked through Gate F at Clark and Addison Streets and into the nation's most beloved ballpark. Though the architecture of Wrigley Field is the same as always--an array of ascending ramps, chain-linked fences, city vistas, and dank inner concourses pierced by streaks of evening sunlight--the atmosphere is palpably different. Gone are the rowdies, the drunks, the tourists; present instead is the eerie timbre of quiet before battle. It is the playoffs, the third game of the first series against the Atlanta Braves, and whether owning to the somber, rainy weather, the melancholy brought on by raised expectations, or, more likely, the Trans-Atlantic airline fares that have passed as market rates for scalped tickets, these fans were here to win.

That was the feeling I had on Friday night when I walked through Gate F at Clark and Addison Streets and into the nation's most beloved ballpark. Though the architecture of Wrigley Field is the same as always--an array of ascending ramps, chain-linked fences, city vistas, and dank inner concourses pierced by streaks of evening sunlight--the atmosphere is palpably different. Gone are the rowdies, the drunks, the tourists; present instead is the eerie timbre of quiet before battle.

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April 11, 2003 12:00 am

Breaking Balls: Environmental Control

0

Derek Zumsteg

Some time ago, I wrote a column on a few of the new ballparks, and using the available evidence on their dimensions, speculated on how they'd play. In response to that column, I got a particularly cool question from a number of different readers. That is: "What would the best pitchers' park look like?" I love the questions that stick in your craw. How far back do you push the fences before today's home runs and many line drives become inside-the-park four-sackers, for instance? In order to answer this question, I took the liberty of persuing our list of historical park factors, and did some sorting, some grouping, and some determining of thresholds.

I love the questions that stick in your craw. How far back do you push the fences before today's home runs and many line drives become inside-the-park four-sackers, for instance?

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In Baseball Prospectus 2002, Joe Sheehan wrote:

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Paraphrasing, the questions look something like this:

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