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Articles Tagged What You Need To Know 

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05-29

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20

Sporer Report: Trading Tips
by
Paul Sporer

04-29

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9

Fantasy Freestyle: The Art of Trading
by
Mike Gianella

03-02

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2

BP Unfiltered: Sloan Q&A: Harry Pavlidis On f/x Tracking Data
by
Zachary Levine and Harry Pavlidis

12-04

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2

BP Unfiltered: From the Winter Meetings: An interview with Dodgers President Stan Kasten
by
Maury Brown

04-09

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34

Baseball Prospectus News: Introducing BP's Daily Content for 2012
by
Ben Lindbergh

03-07

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3

The BP Wayback Machine: Don Mincher, Part 2
by
David Laurila

02-29

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13

Prospectus Preview: AL Central 2012 Preseason Preview, Part Two
by
Steven Goldman and Ben Lindbergh

02-29

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12

Prospectus Preview: AL West 2012 Preseason Preview
by
Jason Parks and Jason Wojciechowski

02-22

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28

Prospectus Preview: NL East 2012 Preseason Preview
by
Derek Carty and Michael Jong

02-20

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19

Prospectus Preview: AL East 2012 Preseason Preview
by
R.J. Anderson and Jason Collette

02-15

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24

The Lineup Card: 12 Opinions on Whether a Significant Other Must Like Baseball
by
Baseball Prospectus

01-31

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25

Overthinking It: Managing Expectations: Baseball's Next Big Inefficiency
by
Ben Lindbergh

01-26

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12

Transaction Analysis: AL on the Rise, and Extensions All Around
by
Ben Lindbergh

01-25

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6

Changing Speeds: The Hall of Famously Weak Arguments, Part 2
by
Ken Funck

01-24

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11

Overthinking It: The Player Popularity Test
by
Ben Lindbergh

01-16

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27

Prospectus Roundtable: Can Anyone Close?
by
Baseball Prospectus

01-12

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13

Prospects Will Break Your Heart: One-on-One with Professor Parks, Part II
by
Jason Parks

01-10

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16

Prospects Will Break Your Heart: One-on-One with Professor Parks, Part I
by
Jason Parks

01-06

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28

Baseball ProGUESTus: The Wisdom of Uncertainty
by
Jason Wojciechowski

12-30

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8

Baseball ProGUESTus: To Live and Die in Three Rivers Stadium, Or: The Face of Michael Cimino
by
David Raposa and David Roth

12-29

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10

Overthinking It: GMs Say the Darndest Things
by
Ben Lindbergh

12-19

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9

Wezen-Ball: The Greatest Comic Ever
by
Larry Granillo

12-13

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13

Overthinking It: Baseball, Sex, and Sheet Music
by
Ben Lindbergh

11-07

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1

Resident Fantasy Genius: Q&A with Brian Kenny
by
Derek Carty

11-07

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54

Future Shock: Yoenis Cespedes: The Showcase
by
Kevin Goldstein

11-06

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0

Transaction Analysis: May 12-15, 2002
by
Christina Kahrl

09-30

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2

Fantasy Beat: Interview with Tout Wars NL Champ Steve Gardner
by
Jason Collette

09-26

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2

Fantasy Beat: Preparing for Next Season
by
Jason Collette

08-10

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48

The Lineup Card: 12 Favorite Basebrawls and Individual Performances in Basebrawls
by
Baseball Prospectus

07-25

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193

Manufactured Runs: Lost in the SIERA Madre
by
Colin Wyers

07-19

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29

Prospects Will Break Your Heart: Caught Up in the Complex League
by
Jason Parks

07-14

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1

Resident Fantasy Genius: Mixed-League Mayhem
by
Derek Carty

06-20

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1

The Week in Quotes: June 13-19
by
Alex Carnevale

06-13

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2

The Week in Quotes: June 6-12
by
Alex Carnevale

06-02

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28

Prospects Will Break Your Heart: U Got the Look: Speed, Makeup, and the Power of Words
by
Jason Parks

05-26

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20

Baseball ProGUESTus: Answers from a Sabermetrician, Part 2
by
Tom Tango

05-24

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5

Baseball ProGUESTus: Answers from a Sabermetrician, Part 1
by
Tom Tango

05-19

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11

Prospects Will Break Your Heart: U Got the Look: Fielders, Part I
by
Jason Parks

05-12

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15

Prospects Will Break Your Heart: U Got the Look: Hitters, Part I
by
Jason Parks

05-05

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21

Baseball ProGUESTus: A Statistician Rereads Bill James
by
Andrew Gelman

05-04

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1

Prospectus Q&A: Matt Capps
by
David Laurila

04-29

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11

Prospectus Q&A: Alex Anthopoulos
by
David Laurila

04-25

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1

The Week in Quotes: April 18-24
by
Alex Carnevale

04-25

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11

Spitballing: Cracking the Scouting Code
by
Jeremy Greenhouse

04-20

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1

Prospectus Q&A: Larry Rothschild
by
David Laurila

04-18

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0

The Week in Quotes: April 11-17
by
Alex Carnevale

03-30

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5

The BP Wayback Machine: Baseball's Hilbert Problems
by
Keith Woolner

03-29

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3

Prospectus Q&A: Andrew Miller
by
David Laurila

03-22

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2

Prospectus Q&A: Quotes from Cardinals Camp
by
David Laurila

03-21

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36

The BP Broadside: Babe Ruth's Fat Dead Cat(s)
by
Steven Goldman

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Tom Tango returns to answer your first batch of questions from last week.

Believe it or not, most of our writers didn't enter the world sporting an @baseballprospectus.com address; with a few exceptions, they started out somewhere else. In an effort to up your reading pleasure while tipping our caps to some of the most illuminating work being done elsewhere on the internet, we'll be yielding the stage once a week to the best and brightest baseball writers, researchers and thinkers from outside of the BP umbrella. If you'd like to nominate a guest contributor (including yourself), please drop us a line.

You asked, he answered. Below are the first batch of responses to the questions BP readers submitted for sabermetrician Tom Tango. All questions are presented in their original form.

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When looking for an infielder or outfielder, what do scouts look for in terms of body, skills, and glove work?

It’s not easy to evaluate defensive tools, especially at the amateur ranks or the lower levels of professional baseball. Good defense is a product of sound fundamentals established through instruction [read: proper instruction], raw physical ability, and refinement through repetition. It takes time to put the total defensive package together, assuming a competent package is even possible. This is what I want to do: I want to look at each position, break down the specific physical attributes that are necessary to excel at each position, and look at the process of projecting those attributes. In part two (you knew that was coming), I want focus on catchers and game-calling, something that I think is one of the most misunderstood and undervalued aspects of the game.

First Base: First base is, first and foremost, an offensive position. The modern game suggests if the bat is above average, the value provided by the glove is gravy. While I agree with the offensive weight attached to the position, I’m of the belief that good defense at first base is more than just gravy, and trust me, I love gravy.

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Just like with pitcher evaluation, hitter evaluation requires a keen eye for a solid player body.

In parts one and two of this series, I exhausted the word allotments per piece, yet barely scratched the surface of the subject at hand. A proper breakdown of what I look for in a pitcher would probably require a six-beer conversation, and that’s rushing it a bit. Talking continuously while maintaining a socially acceptable pace of alcohol consumption, I would need at least three hours on the platform to expatiate my thoughts on the process of pitching evaluation. Have you ever listened to someone talk for three straight hours about pitching? It’s awesome, but it requires passion, patience, and an ever-climbing blood alcohol level. The point is, I wanted to offer more, but articulating my thoughts on this page proved to be more difficult than I imagined. I’m sure it comes as no shock to you that drinking and running my mouth about scouting come naturally, while writing succinct articles with clever narratives proves to be more difficult.

Before taking the stage to deliver my thoughts on the evaluation of hitters, it needs to be stated that like the previous articles, this is going to be a six-beer conversation compressed into a few thousand words. (Actually, it would probably require a 12-beer conversation or two separate six-beer sessions, but let’s not even go there.)  Because of the density involved, I’m sometimes going to paint with a wide brush, but I’ll get precise when a detail needs dissection. As is the case for every article I write (or fail to write), my door [read: my electronic door] is always open to the fine readers of Baseball Prospectus. If you ever have any comments, questions, insults, accolades, or want clarification on a point, or want me to expand on a comment that didn’t receive enough explanation, I’m always willing to start up a conversation or provide a more thorough description. Don’t be shy.

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Bill James may claim to study baseball questions, not statistical ones, but what happens when a statistician studies Bill James?

Believe it or not, most of our writers didn't enter the world sporting an @baseballprospectus.com address; with a few exceptions, they started out somewhere else. In an effort to up your reading pleasure while tipping our caps to some of the most illuminating work being done elsewhere on the internet, we'll be yielding the stage once a week to the best and brightest baseball writers, researchers and thinkers from outside of the BP umbrella. If you'd like to nominate a guest contributor (including yourself), please drop us a line.

Andrew Gelman is a professor of statistics and political science at Columbia University. He occasionally blogs on baseball, including here, here, here, and here.


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The Twins' closer discusses the use of video, making mechanical corrections, and what plays into success.

Matt Capps is closing in Minnesota, and he’s doing so with a more advanced approach than he brought to the mound when he first broke into the big leagues with the Pirates in 2005. The 27-year-old right-hander has always been a hard thrower, but more recently he has become a better student of the game, utilizing video to gain a better understanding of his mechanics. Capps, who logged 42 saves last season between stints with the Nationals and Twins, sat down with Baseball Prospectus in spring training.

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April 29, 2011 5:51 am

Prospectus Q&A: Alex Anthopoulos

11

David Laurila

The Blue Jays' GM discusses his organizational philosophy, his love of scouting and how it plays a role in his work, and competing in the AL East.

He’s too humble to admit it, but Alex Anthopoulos has done an outstanding job since replacing J.P. Ricciardi as the general manager of the Toronto Blue Jays in October 2009. He has orchestrated high-impact trades, most notably deals involving Roy Halladay and Vernon Wells, as well as prudent, if not as newsworthy, free-agent signings. Just as importantly, he has been placing a huge emphasis on scouting and player development, which should come as no surprise given his background as a scouting coordinator. A 33-year-old native of Montreal, Anthopoulos has an economics degree from McMaster University.

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The notable quotables from the week that was.

TIM LINCECUM IS NOT AN ANIMAL

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The mysterious art of scouting needn't defy analysis, as long as ratings are applied consistently.

Consistency: the word itself a food metaphor, irony dripping from it like ice cream from a half-melted cone. Despite the rhetoric, consistency doesn’t matter much in baseball. What matters is being good. In the process of evaluating ballplayers, however, consistency is all that matters.

Scouts grade prospects based on a 20-80 scale where 50 is average, and, according to one scout*, “one grade is a standard deviation. Think of it as a bell curve.”

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April 20, 2011 9:00 am

Prospectus Q&A: Larry Rothschild

1

David Laurila

The Yankees' pitching coach delves into his use of statistical analysis, the importance of consistency, and his work with A.J. Burnett and Phil Hughes.

When the Yankees hired Larry Rothschild this past offseason, they brought one of the game’s most highly-respected pitching coaches aboard. The 57-year-old Rothschild had spent the last nine years as the pitching coach for the Chicago Cubs, part of a professional career that began over three decades ago. A big-league pitcher for parts of the 1981 and 1982 seasons, he later became the first manager in Tampa Bay history, holding that position from 1998-2001.

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The notable quotables from the week that was.

FISCAL CONSERVATISM, MASSACHUSETTS STYLE

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How many of the last millenium's burning baseball questions remain unanswered over a decade down the road?

While looking toward the future with our comprehensive slate of current content, we'd also like to recognize our rich past by drawing upon our extensive online archive of work dating back to 1997. In an effort to highlight the best of what's gone before, we'll be bringing you a weekly blast from BP's past, introducing or re-introducing you to some of the most informative and entertaining authors who have passed through our virtual halls. If you have fond recollections of a BP piece that you'd like to nominate for re-exposure to a wider audience, send us your suggestion.

Over 11 years after their publication in Baseball Prospectus 2000, how many of Keith's questions for a new millenium have we already set to rest?


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March 29, 2011 9:00 am

Prospectus Q&A: Andrew Miller

3

David Laurila

The former top prospect discusses his rocky road in the majors, how he has overhauled his pitching mechanics, and his mental approach to the game.

Andrew Miller is an enigma getting another chance. Just how many more he’ll get, or needs, remains to be seen, but it is notable that the flame-throwing southpaw is only 25. Given all he has been through, you’d be excused for thinking he is older.

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