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05-29

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20

Sporer Report: Trading Tips
by
Paul Sporer

04-29

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9

Fantasy Freestyle: The Art of Trading
by
Mike Gianella

03-02

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2

BP Unfiltered: Sloan Q&A: Harry Pavlidis On f/x Tracking Data
by
Zachary Levine and Harry Pavlidis

12-04

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2

BP Unfiltered: From the Winter Meetings: An interview with Dodgers President Stan Kasten
by
Maury Brown

04-09

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34

Baseball Prospectus News: Introducing BP's Daily Content for 2012
by
Ben Lindbergh

03-07

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3

The BP Wayback Machine: Don Mincher, Part 2
by
David Laurila

02-29

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13

Prospectus Preview: AL Central 2012 Preseason Preview, Part Two
by
Steven Goldman and Ben Lindbergh

02-29

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12

Prospectus Preview: AL West 2012 Preseason Preview
by
Jason Parks and Jason Wojciechowski

02-22

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28

Prospectus Preview: NL East 2012 Preseason Preview
by
Derek Carty and Michael Jong

02-20

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19

Prospectus Preview: AL East 2012 Preseason Preview
by
R.J. Anderson and Jason Collette

02-15

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24

The Lineup Card: 12 Opinions on Whether a Significant Other Must Like Baseball
by
Baseball Prospectus

01-31

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25

Overthinking It: Managing Expectations: Baseball's Next Big Inefficiency
by
Ben Lindbergh

01-26

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12

Transaction Analysis: AL on the Rise, and Extensions All Around
by
Ben Lindbergh

01-25

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6

Changing Speeds: The Hall of Famously Weak Arguments, Part 2
by
Ken Funck

01-24

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11

Overthinking It: The Player Popularity Test
by
Ben Lindbergh

01-16

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27

Prospectus Roundtable: Can Anyone Close?
by
Baseball Prospectus

01-12

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13

Prospects Will Break Your Heart: One-on-One with Professor Parks, Part II
by
Jason Parks

01-10

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16

Prospects Will Break Your Heart: One-on-One with Professor Parks, Part I
by
Jason Parks

01-06

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28

Baseball ProGUESTus: The Wisdom of Uncertainty
by
Jason Wojciechowski

12-30

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8

Baseball ProGUESTus: To Live and Die in Three Rivers Stadium, Or: The Face of Michael Cimino
by
David Raposa and David Roth

12-29

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10

Overthinking It: GMs Say the Darndest Things
by
Ben Lindbergh

12-19

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9

Wezen-Ball: The Greatest Comic Ever
by
Larry Granillo

12-13

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13

Overthinking It: Baseball, Sex, and Sheet Music
by
Ben Lindbergh

11-07

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1

Resident Fantasy Genius: Q&A with Brian Kenny
by
Derek Carty

11-07

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54

Future Shock: Yoenis Cespedes: The Showcase
by
Kevin Goldstein

11-06

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0

Transaction Analysis: May 12-15, 2002
by
Christina Kahrl

09-30

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2

Fantasy Beat: Interview with Tout Wars NL Champ Steve Gardner
by
Jason Collette

09-26

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2

Fantasy Beat: Preparing for Next Season
by
Jason Collette

08-10

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48

The Lineup Card: 12 Favorite Basebrawls and Individual Performances in Basebrawls
by
Baseball Prospectus

07-25

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193

Manufactured Runs: Lost in the SIERA Madre
by
Colin Wyers

07-19

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29

Prospects Will Break Your Heart: Caught Up in the Complex League
by
Jason Parks

07-14

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1

Resident Fantasy Genius: Mixed-League Mayhem
by
Derek Carty

06-20

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1

The Week in Quotes: June 13-19
by
Alex Carnevale

06-13

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2

The Week in Quotes: June 6-12
by
Alex Carnevale

06-02

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28

Prospects Will Break Your Heart: U Got the Look: Speed, Makeup, and the Power of Words
by
Jason Parks

05-26

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20

Baseball ProGUESTus: Answers from a Sabermetrician, Part 2
by
Tom Tango

05-24

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5

Baseball ProGUESTus: Answers from a Sabermetrician, Part 1
by
Tom Tango

05-19

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11

Prospects Will Break Your Heart: U Got the Look: Fielders, Part I
by
Jason Parks

05-12

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15

Prospects Will Break Your Heart: U Got the Look: Hitters, Part I
by
Jason Parks

05-05

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21

Baseball ProGUESTus: A Statistician Rereads Bill James
by
Andrew Gelman

05-04

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1

Prospectus Q&A: Matt Capps
by
David Laurila

04-29

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11

Prospectus Q&A: Alex Anthopoulos
by
David Laurila

04-25

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1

The Week in Quotes: April 18-24
by
Alex Carnevale

04-25

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11

Spitballing: Cracking the Scouting Code
by
Jeremy Greenhouse

04-20

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1

Prospectus Q&A: Larry Rothschild
by
David Laurila

04-18

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0

The Week in Quotes: April 11-17
by
Alex Carnevale

03-30

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5

The BP Wayback Machine: Baseball's Hilbert Problems
by
Keith Woolner

03-29

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3

Prospectus Q&A: Andrew Miller
by
David Laurila

03-22

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2

Prospectus Q&A: Quotes from Cardinals Camp
by
David Laurila

03-21

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36

The BP Broadside: Babe Ruth's Fat Dead Cat(s)
by
Steven Goldman

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Assessing whether the AL got stronger this offseason, evaluating extensions for Tim Lincecum, Brandon Morrow, and Mike Morse, and tackling Toronto's moves for Francisco Cordero and Omar Vizquel.

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Following up with eight more baseball arguments that often don't make sense.

Last week in this space, I unveiled the first seven nominees for the Hall of Famously Weak Baseball Arguments, my fictional museum of unsupportable or outdated baseball beliefs. Below you’ll find those initial seven listed without further comment, along with the final eight. As before, I’ve essayed to describe the times and places where you’ll hear these groaners, why I believe they’re weak, and situations in which they may actually be correct.

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Proposing a new way to settle an old debate about which players get too much attention and which are overlooked.

Years of talking about baseball have taught me at least two things: it’s dangerous to shout “Francoeur!” in a crowded room, and it’s difficult to gauge a player’s popularity, especially outside of the sabermetric bubble. Unless you work for a club and have access to information on team merchandise and ticket sales—and maybe even if you do—it’s tough to know how high a profile a player has among fans. So how can we decide if a particular player is overrated or underrated, or whether he gets more or less attention than his play on the field might merit? Are we forever doomed to count google hits?

We can approach this problem in a number of ways. If I were Vince Gennaro, author of Diamond Dollars, I might spend several hundred hours developing a proprietary “marquee value” metric based on social media measurements and other components to assess the off-the-field value of star players. Then I’d write a book and a bunch of articles about it and consult with major-league teams.  Well, here’s a blurry picture of me sitting at the same table as Vince Gennaro (also pictured: part of Kevin Goldstein’s fedora). I may look like I have one strangely-shaped eye and don’t trust Cory Schwartz, but do I look like I’m Vince Gennaro? Not particularly.  So that’s not what I did.

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Is there such a thing as a "closer mentality," or can any effective setup man handle the closer role? The BP staff tries to get to the bottom of the matter.

The following is an edited transcript of an in-house discussion that took place among the Baseball Prospectus staff when one of our number solicited examples of unsupportable baseball arguments for an upcoming article. After Kevin proposed "Anyone can close," the thread took off in a new direction.

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The Professor is questioned about scouting, his favourite prospects, and his identity.

Part One of this exclusive interview with Professor Parks can be found here.

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Professor Parks takes on his most difficult journalistic assignment yet: Interviewing Professor Parks.

Having just returned from the strange planet known as Mexico City, I finally nailed down the Professor—who isn’t actually a professor—for a little one-on-one. It was a pointed conversation between two men with similar names and different approaches. I took a casual stroll over to his Brooklyn location, a place that could be the billboard that advertises all the reasons people with seemingly useless liberal arts degrees have damaged the earth. Earlier that day, the Professor seemed excited to inform me that he has the technology to open the first of two entryway doors from the interior of his own apartment, placing the burden on my fingers to press the appropriate button to set in motion the technological advances he seems so smitten with. Apparently having such technology is how hipsters with crappy apartments judge themselves against other hipsters with crappy apartments. It’s like people with doormen or great smiles: Once you live with that luxury, you can’t really feel any pain.

After I press the appropriate button, I can hear his ego over the intercom as he once again makes me aware that he has the power to open the door with the touch of a button. He’s like a child who just discovered that the moon and sun are different objects in the sky, and passionately points out that distinction when applicable. I allow him the time to relish in his newly-discovered modern age and wait for the door to unsecure. A man with a curious smirk and a familiar face meets me at the top of the third-floor stairs; it’s a face I’ve seen my entire life in some form or the other. He invites me in and immediately offers me a glass of chilled gin. I decline because it’s hours before the day hits noon, and I’m uneasy that such an offer was made in the first place. He’s wearing an oversized sombrero that makes him look like a bad gringo cartoon and a sweater that is not only incongruent to the aesthetic he is putting forth, but looks like something an elderly Peruvian woman would wear on the journey to her deathbed. I expected a more established presence; for all the pomp and talk of handsome style, the Professor wasn’t showing me either. From the jump, he was letting the name we conveniently share go to spoil.

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Rather than rushing to judgment when a team makes a move, take a moment to consider what you might be missing.

Believe it or not, most of our writers didn't enter the world sporting an @baseballprospectus.com address; with a few exceptions, they started out somewhere else. In an effort to up your reading pleasure while tipping our caps to some of the most illuminating work being done elsewhere on the internet, we'll be yielding the stage once a week to the best and brightest baseball writers, researchers and thinkers from outside of the BP umbrella. If you'd like to nominate a guest contributor (including yourself), please drop us a line.

Jason Wojciechowski is the founder and sole author of Beaneball, a blog about the A’s. He also contributes to The Platoon Advantage on more general baseball topics. His college thesis was in computational number theory but he is now a labor lawyer with a Twitter addiction (@jlwoj).

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The two Davids conduct a humorous dialogue on all the hot stove happenings.

Believe it or not, most of our writers didn't enter the world sporting an @baseballprospectus.com address; with a few exceptions, they started out somewhere else. In an effort to up your reading pleasure while tipping our caps to some of the most illuminating work being done elsewhere on the internet, we'll be yielding the stage once a week to the best and brightest baseball writers, researchers and thinkers from outside of the BP umbrella. If you'd like to nominate a guest contributor (including yourself), please drop us a line.

David Raposa writes about music for Pitchfork and other places. He used to write about baseball for the blog formerly known as Yard Work. He occasionally blogs for himself, and he also tweets way too much.


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Before you believe everything your team's general manager says, remember these great moments in GM-speak, featuring half-truths, misdirections, and statements that turned out to be false.

Baseball fans will believe almost anything if they’re starved enough for news. No source is too far removed from the situation, no rumor too far-fetched to attract attention as long as it arrives on a slow news day and can be expressed in 140 characters. Ruben Amaro thinks Vernon Wells could be the Phillies’ answer in left field and wants to offer him an extension? You don't say. Brian Sabean is considering signing a hitter? Now you’re pushing it, but sure, it could happen. A team is talking about trading Zack Greinke for Jeff Francoeur? Okay, so no one would actually say that. (Wait—someone did.)

When a piece of information is couched in conditionals and comes to us through multiple intermediaries—a writer plus someone he knows who knows someone else—we don’t expect perfect accuracy. Anonymously sourced tidbits are generally something to discuss and dream about, not something you can count on. But surely we can trust the men whose job it is to put their clubs together. After all, who would know better what’s in a team’s plans than the man in charge of making them? Can’t we take what a GM says as gospel?

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A look at a 1976 comic book featuring a baseball game between superheroes and supervillians.

Allow me to introduce you to the single greatest comic book issue ever printed, courtesy of The Comic Treadmill:

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Lou Gehrig put out less often than he made out, getting on base in the batter's box helps you get on base in the bedroom, taking a girl to a game is the best way to beat birth control, and other lessons I learned from old-timey baseball songs. (Caution: some adult themes.)

Baseball and sheet music. Put them together, and the very words conjure images of taking in an afternoon affair at the ballpark with one's nearest and dearest before retiring to the parlor and gathering 'round the piano for the latest in Victorian after-dinner entertainment.* What could be more wholesome?

Everything, apparently. The following songs, unearthed on a trip through the Library of Congress' online Performing Arts Encyclopedia, are dirty enough to make one wonder why it was that Nelly Kelly** loved baseball games, and—even more suspiciously—how she came to know all the players' names.

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With MLB Network's debut of "Clubhouse Confidential" scheduled for tonight, the show's host discusses what to expect and the use of stats on the program.

This weekend, I had a great chat with Brian Kenny, former “SportsCenter” anchor and the soon-to-be-host of the MLB Network’s latest show, “Clubhouse Confidential,” television’s first sabermetrically-slanted baseball program. “Clubhouse Confidential” debuts tonight at 5:30 EST, and I had the chance to talk with Brian ahead of the premiere about his background with sabermetrics, what we should expect from the show, and some other topics. You can check out the press release announcing the show here to get some additional background.

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