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Articles Tagged Washington 

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05-11

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BP Announcements: Baseball Prospectus Day at Nationals Park - July 7, 2013
by
Joe Hamrahi

04-08

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2

Wezen-Ball: The 2013 Interleague Schedule
by
Larry Granillo

01-22

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8

Minor League Update: Potential Impact Rookies (NL EAST)
by
Jason Martinez

11-13

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37

Bizball: Ranking 10 MLB Relocation and Expansion Markets Shows Why Either is Difficult
by
Maury Brown

07-03

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5

Western Front: Ready, Set, No!
by
Geoff Young

02-06

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6

Transaction Analysis: Jackson Settles for One Year
by
R.J. Anderson

11-04

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3

Transaction Analysis: Nationals Sign Wang
by
R.J. Anderson

10-31

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33

World Series Prospectus: A Card Fought Win
by
Jay Jaffe

10-28

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54

World Series Prospectus: Game Six: The Crazy Train Keeps Rolling
by
Jay Jaffe

10-23

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8

World Series Prospectus: Once, Twice, Three Times a Long Ball
by
Jay Jaffe

10-20

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2

Baseball ProGUESTus: A League of Their Own?
by
Adam Sobsey

10-20

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16

World Series Prospectus: Opening Salvos
by
Jay Jaffe

10-20

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12

Manufactured Runs: Punting on Punto
by
Colin Wyers

10-19

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23

World Series Prospectus: The Midwest Showdown
by
Baseball Prospectus

10-18

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8

On the Beat: Rangers Renaissance
by
John Perrotto

10-12

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5

Playoff Prospectus: ALCS Game Three: Miggy Shines
by
R.J. Anderson

10-11

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10

Playoff Prospectus: ALCS Game Two: A Grand Opportunity
by
R.J. Anderson

09-08

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12

The Lineup Card: 9 Forgotten Players from Defunct Franchises
by
Baseball Prospectus

06-29

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4

Divide and Conquer, NL East: National Fever
by
Michael Jong

06-03

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1

On the Beat: Back on the Attack
by
John Perrotto

04-23

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9

Wezen-Ball: Who is Baseball's Ron Swanson?
by
Larry Granillo

03-14

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36

Ahead in the Count: Battle for the Beltway
by
Matt Swartz

11-30

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41

Future Shock: Cleveland Indians Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

10-31

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10

World Series Prospectus: Game Three Report
by
John Perrotto

10-29

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11

World Series Prospectus: Game Two Report
by
John Perrotto

10-29

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25

World Series Prospectus: Game Two Analysis
by
Christina Kahrl

10-28

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10

World Series Prospectus: Game One Analysis
by
Christina Kahrl

10-26

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19

World Series Prospectus: World Series Preview
by
Christina Kahrl

10-22

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0

On the Beat: Creating a Mindset
by
John Perrotto

10-20

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40

Playoff Prospectus: ALCS Game Four
by
Christina Kahrl

10-19

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13

Playoff Prospectus: ALCS Game Three
by
Christina Kahrl

10-14

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17

Playoff Prospectus: ALCS Preview: Rangers vs. Yankees
by
Jay Jaffe

10-11

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5

On the Beat: Billy The Kid's Last Stand
by
John Perrotto

10-10

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14

Playoff Prospectus: LDS Day Four Roundup
by
Christina Kahrl

10-05

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9

Playoff Prospectus: ALDS Preview: Rays vs. Rangers
by
Ben Lindbergh

09-20

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6

Kiss'Em Goodbye: Washington Nationals
by
John Perrotto, Kevin Goldstein and ESPN Insider

06-11

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3

Campus Notes: Super Regionals Preview, Part 2
by
Charles Dahan

04-16

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4

On the Beat: Friday Update
by
John Perrotto

03-21

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6

On the Beat: Weekend Update
by
John Perrotto

02-11

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14

You Could Look It Up: Three Joes and Some Other Guys Named Overbay
by
Steven Goldman

09-20

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4

Kiss'Em Goodbye: Washington Nationals
by
Baseball Prospectus

08-16

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6

On the Beat: Weekend Roundup
by
John Perrotto

06-10

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3

On the Beat: Mid-Week Roundup
by
John Perrotto

06-10

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10

Future Shock: First-Round Recap
by
Kevin Goldstein

05-17

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20

Prospectus Idol Entry: Jeff Euston's Initial Entry
by
Jeff Euston

11-12

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16

Hot Stove Preview
by
Caleb Peiffer

09-04

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Prospectus Preview: Thursday's Games to Watch
by
Caleb Peiffer

09-02

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Prospectus Preview: Tuesday's Games to Watch
by
Caleb Peiffer

08-24

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Prospectus Q&A: Ron Washington
by
David Laurila

07-19

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Prospectus Preview: Saturday's Games to Watch
by
Caleb Peiffer

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BP invades the nation's capital

Baseball Prospectus and the Washington Nationals invite you to join us for a great day of baseball on Sunday, July 7 at Nationals Park. Thanks to the fine folks in the Nationals front office, we are proud to be able to offer our guests the following:

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Breaking down the 2013 interleague schedule for all 30 teams. What teams are forced to deviate from their regular roster/lineup construction for the longest stretch of the year?

With the Astros finally moved into the American League, we have a very different interleague schedule this year. Not only does it mean that there is now at least one interleague series happening each day of the season, from April to October, it also means that the "rivalry weekends" that were the highlights of the interleague schedule fifteen years ago have been re-shaped. Additionally, the newly balanced divisions mean that, outside of the rivalry games, all teams in a given division can play the exact same teams as their divisional opponents. No longer do the schedule makers have to worry about a six-team division matching up with a four-team division.

So how did the schedule makers do? Did the schedule turn out as balanced as can be? Were they able to ensure that teams from any one division would have the same opponents as their division-mates? Were all clubs given the same number of interleague matches or did some lucky squad or two end up a series short? One thing to remember here is that, with interleague games happening all year long instead of on two or three specific weekends, clubs are now on unequal footing when it comes to setting their rosters for the change in league rules. If one team, for example, only ever has to worry about forcing their pitchers to hit one weekend a month, they are probably in a better situation than the club forced to suddenly remove their all-star DH for nine straight games. National League clubs playing in American League ballparks will have similar problems in trying to add a DH for extended periods of time.

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January 22, 2013 1:25 am

Minor League Update: Potential Impact Rookies (NL EAST)

8

Jason Martinez

Potential Impact Rookies in 2013 (NL EAST)

When we talk about "impact" rookies, it's important to note that several rookies will be getting the call to the majors and failing to help their team in any way shape or form. Coming up with a few big hits or making a couple of quality starts, however, could make a big difference at the end of a 162-game season. Beginning in the NL East, I'll be taking a look at each team and picking out some rookies who I think will make an impact on their team's success in 2013. 

Atlanta Braves

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A look at the ten most likely places for a new MLB club

It seems that nearly every week, articles surrounding the potential relocation of the A’s and Rays surface. A panel looking into a potential San Jose relocation for the A’s has been gridlocked since 2009 (and remember, the A’s have been looking to move to San Jose for a heck of a lot longer than that). The Rays haven’t been far behind in their efforts to get out of Tropicana Field. Whether it’s the commute for fans to get to the domed stadium, the aesthetics, or the need to be closer to an urban core, it seems that Tampa Bay has been seeking a new ballpark for just as long. Relocation for these two clubs is crucial.

Another thing that comes up less frequently but has extra meaning going into 2013 is expansion. With the Astros moving into the AL West, the American League and National League will now be balanced at 15 clubs a piece. The problem is that 15 is an odd number, and as a result, interleague will become a daily affair. It’s unlikely that’s something that the league wanted, so getting to 32 clubs would take care of that matter. That would mean revenues spread thinner with two extra mouths to feed. Additionally, it’s no given that one or both wouldn’t be revenue-sharing takers, and trying to get ballparks built is no easy feat in this economy. So, 30 is a number that seems to suit the “Big Four” sports leagues in North America. The NBA has it. Ditto for the NHL. Currently, only the NFL—which has the advantage of being highly centralized (revenues are shared more evenly across the franchises) and exceptionally popular—is the exception at 32 clubs.

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July 3, 2012 5:00 am

Western Front: Ready, Set, No!

5

Geoff Young

Geoff compares members of the Tacoma Rainiers to Twilight characters using the 20-80 scale. Or maybe he would have, if he'd been able to see the team play.

“Who said that?”

“Nobody, I was just trying to make you feel better.”

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February 6, 2012 3:00 am

Transaction Analysis: Jackson Settles for One Year

6

R.J. Anderson

Edwin Jackson settles for a one-year deal, Casey Kotchman lands in Cleveland, and Todd Coffey joins the Dodger bullpen



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November 4, 2011 11:18 am

Transaction Analysis: Nationals Sign Wang

3

R.J. Anderson

Rather than looking for a new arm, the Nationals fill a need with a familiar face.

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While anticlimactic after Game Six, the final game of the World Series capped off one of the most exciting postseasons in recent memory

That Game Seven of the 2011 World Series couldn't match the drama of Game Six was almost a given even before the first pitch was thrown. We don't talk about the finales of the 1975 or 1986 World Series in the same reverential tones as we do their penultimate contests, great though they may have been on their own merits. So unsurprisingly, we were not treated to a Jack Morris-level performance or an extra-inning walk-off win to complete the neat historical parallel provided by the Buck family’s "We'll see you tomorrow night!" calls following game-winning homers. Nonetheless, the first Game Seven in nine years required one more come-from-behind effort—down 2-0 before their starter had retired a single hitter—as well as heroics from some familiar names for the Cardinals to complete one of the most unlikely comebacks in baseball history en route to winning their 11th world championship via a 6-2 win over the Rangers.

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October 28, 2011 10:37 am

World Series Prospectus: Game Six: The Crazy Train Keeps Rolling

54

Jay Jaffe

If you tuned out when the Rangers led 7-5 in the ninth, you missed quite a finish

It was the best worst World Series game—or perhaps the worst best World Series game—I've ever seen. Four and a half hours, 11 innings, 42 players, 19 runs, 23 men left on base, six home runs, five errors, two final-strike comebacks, a handful of bad relief performances, some managerial howlers including a cardinal (not Cardinal) sin… and it all ended with the much-maligned Joe Buck giving a fitting nod to history by emulating one of his father's most famous calls. As David Freese's game-winning blast landed in the grass beyond the center field wall of Busch Stadium, Buck exclaimed, "We'll see you tomorrow night!" Game Six of the 2011 World Series will be remembered as a classic—a Game Six that can sit alongside those of 1975, 1986, and 1991, among maybe a couple others—as the Cardinals staved off elimination to beat the Rangers 10-9, forcing a Game Seven.

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October 23, 2011 1:15 pm

World Series Prospectus: Once, Twice, Three Times a Long Ball

8

Jay Jaffe

Albert Pujols makes history in the process of putting the Cardinals up 2-1.

"When you have the bat in your hand, you can always change the story," said Reggie Jackson years ago. Mired in the controversy regarding a post-Game Two no-show following his ninth-inning relay flub, Albert Pujols changed the story on Saturday night, becoming just the third player ever to hit three home runs in a World Series game and collecting five hits en route to a Series-record 14 total bases. Before hitting his first home run, Pujols had already collected two hits while helping the Cardinals build an 8-6 lead; his three-run, sixth-inning homer off Alexi Ogando broke the game open en route to a 16-7 rout and a 2-1 Series lead. The Cardinals' 16 runs tied the 2002 Giants and 1960 Yankees for the second-highest single-game total in Series history.

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Interleague play and expanded playoffs have done away with many of the differences in AL and NL play and personality, but some traces remain.

Believe it or not, most of our writers didn't enter the world sporting an @baseballprospectus.com address; with a few exceptions, they started out somewhere else. In an effort to up your reading pleasure while tipping our caps to some of the most illuminating work being done elsewhere on the internet, we'll be yielding the stage once a week to the best and brightest baseball writers, researchers and thinkers from outside of the BP umbrella. If you'd like to nominate a guest contributor (including yourself), please drop us a line.

Adam Sobsey has been the Durham Bulls beat writer for the Independent Weekly since 2009. He has also won numerous awards as a playwright, and his work has been staged in New York, California, Austin and North Carolina. His most recent play, WESTERN MEN, or OPPOSITE TO HUMANITY, was a comparative intertextual weaving of Shakespeare's TIMON OF ATHENS with the lifelong friendship between the poet Ezra Pound and the painter/author Wyndham Lewis, commissioned and premiered by Little Green Pig Theatrical Concern at the Nasher Museum of Art in October 2010. As a journalist, he has won the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies Award for Arts Criticism, and two North Carolina Press Association Awards. In 2012, Adam will collaborate with writer Sam Stephenson, creator of the Jazz Loft Project, on a season-long documentary project about the Durham Bulls.
 


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October 20, 2011 4:30 am

World Series Prospectus: Opening Salvos

16

Jay Jaffe

After seeing poor starting pitching in both Championship Series, the World Series began with relatively strong starting performances.

After two League Championship Series full of slugfests, slopfests, and short starts—the four teams scored 5.5 runs per game while their starters averaged 4.8 innings per turn—the opener of the 2011 World Series between the Rangers and the Cardinals gave us a tight, low-scoring ballgame with solid-to-good starting pitching. True to LCS form, both managers emptied their bullpens with mostly-effective processions, but the Cardinals' bench and relief corps got the upper hand on two key plays, one of them a pinch-hit single by Allen Craig that Nelson Cruz almost caught, scoring the decisive run, the other an awful call that cost the Rangers a ninth-inning out. Behind those, and a few big hits from the middle of their lineup, the Redbirds took Game One in chilly, 49-degree St. Louis, 3-2.

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