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Articles Tagged Wade Boggs 

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December 14, 2012 5:00 am

Skewed Left: The Company They Tweet

10

Zachary Levine

You can learn a lot about a baseballer by the people he follows.

It can be hard to learn a lot from a ballplayer’s tweets, which are mostly 140-character treatises on what you want to hear. Luckily, there is a column right next to his tweets that can reveal a little bit more. People tweet what they’re supposed to tweet, but for the most part, they follow whom they want to follow. Their follows are a window to their interests, their reading lists, their playlists and their senses of humor.

For instance, if you were to look at a certain Baseball Prospectus writer’s list of follows, you’d find that he’s inappropriately attached to two cities where he no longer lives, he’s the only 27-year-old on the planet who gets instantaneous thoroughbred racing news, and the only parody account he finds funny is this one.

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Looking back at the greatest round of ringers ever assembled on the greatest animated show ever produced.

This Sunday Fox aired the 500th - yes, five-zero-zero - episode of its flagship program, "The Simpsons". Once one of the greatest shows on television, the show has had it's ups and downs since the turn of the century, but it's still going strong ratings-wise. To celebrate the remarkable occasion, I've pulled out an old favorite from the Wezen-Ball archives. The post doesn't quite analyze the single-greatest "Simpsons" episode ever - sadly, Hank Scorpio bought Homer the Denver Broncos and not, say, the Chicago Cubs for helping him take over the East Coast - but it does analyze the single-greatest baseball-themed Simpsons episode ever.

So - how good would a 1992 baseball fan have considered the Springfield Nuclear Power Plant team of ringers to have been?

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Looking back at some of the quaint records broken in 1988.

Earlier this week, Milwaukee Brewers closer John Axford set a club record by saving his 26th straight game for the club. Former mustachioed closer Doug Jones held the previous record for the Brewers, with a 25-game streak in 1997. As you may imagine, Jones' name got mentioned on Brewers' broadcasts in the days leading to the save more times than in the last 10+ years combined. Aside from making me wonder when Jones ever pitched for the Brewers (he'll always be an Indian in my mind), I didn't think too much of it.

Talking with friends of mine, though, it quickly became clear that not everyone remembers Jones at all, Indian or Brewer or Athletic alike. So I did what anyone would do - I went to Google and found an old Jones baseball card that featured his legendary 'stache so prominently. The card I chose was the 1989 Topps Record Breaker shown below. It doesn't have as close-up of a view as I was hoping, but it got the job done.

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A conversation about analysis and the game with the former skipper and present-day talking head.

Buck Showalter is in many ways an old-school baseball man, but that doesn’t mean the former Yankees, Diamondbacks, and Rangers skipper doesn‘t value data -- or that he hasn’t for more than three decades. He unmistakably understands the mechanics of the game. Currently an analyst for ESPN, Showalter offered his thoughts on a variety of subjects, including how the game has (and hasn’t) changed, why Paul O’Neill could hit southpaws, why switch-sliders make good switch-hitters, and what makes the Twins the Twins.

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Revisiting a conversation with the long-time official scorer in Boston.

Chaz Scoggins has been the primary official scorer at Fenway Park for over 30 years. A long-time sportswriter for The Lowell Sun and a former president of the Baseball Writers Association of America, Scoggins sat down for this interview in December 2004.

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July 23, 2008 12:00 am

Transaction Analysis: Golddiggers and Going For It

0

Christina Kahrl

Two trades look like they have two clear winners, plus what's moving and shaking from around both leagues.

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September 21, 2007 12:00 am

Lies, Damned Lies: The Best Player in Baseball, Part Two

4

Nate Silver

The conclusion to Nate's overview on the game's best player, season by season.

This is the resumption of the discussion of the best player in baseball, season by season throughout history, that began with yesterday's article. If you missed Nate's handy field guide and spreadsheet from yesterday's piece, you can download it here.

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August 2, 2005 12:00 am

Prospectus Matchups: Word to the Third

0

Jim Baker

With Sunday's Hall of Fame inductions in mind, Jim takes a look at the most underrepresented position in the Hall.

The Hall of Fame inductions of Wade Boggs and Ryne Sandberg on Sunday put me in mind of another player who conjoins two of their signatures: third base (Boggs) and the Chicago Cubs (Sandberg). A lifer from the former who played the latter remains unelected to date and it may well be the biggest injustice in the game today. He is, of course, Ron Santo.

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December 16, 2004 12:00 am

The Class of 2005

0

Jay Jaffe

There are 16 position players on the Hall of Fame ballot. Jay Jaffe thinks three of them belong in Cooperstown.

These new metrics enable us to identify candidates who are as good or better than the average Hall of Famer at their position. By promoting those players for election, we can avoid further diluting the quality of the Hall's membership. Clay Davenport's Translations make an ideal tool for this endeavor because they normalize all performance records in major-league history to the same scoring environment, adjusting for park effects, quality of competition and length of schedule. All pitchers, hitters and fielders are thus rated above or below one consistent replacement level, making cross-era comparisons a breeze. Though non-statistical considerations--awards, championships, postseason performance--shouldn't be left by the wayside in weighing a player's Hall of Fame case, they're not the focus here.

Since election to the Hall of Fame requires a player to perform both at a very high level and for a long time, it's inappropriate to rely simply on career Wins Above Replacement (WARP, which for this exercise refers exclusively to the adjusted-for-all-time version. WARP3). For this process I also identified each player's peak value as determined by the player's WARP in his best five consecutive seasons (with allowances made for seasons lost to war or injury). That choice is an admittedly arbitrary one; I simply selected a peak vaue that was relatively easy to calculate and that, at five years, represented a minimum of half the career of a Hall of Famer.

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November 30, 2004 12:00 am

Prospectus Matchups: The Class of '05

0

Jim Baker

A dozen men find their names on the Hall of Fame ballot for the first time. Of those, just one is a serious candidate for induction.

  • Wade Boggs: Boggs fits just about all the definitions of a Hall of Famer. He had a nice peak and hit the necessary milestone career-wise. He played the majority of his career at a position that is under-represented in Cooperstown. Is he a first-ballot candidate? Probably.
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    May 14, 2003 12:00 am

    Lies, Damned Lies: Randomness: Catch the Fever!

    0

    Nate Silver

    Your favorite player hit .360 last season. If you know nothing else, what can you expect him to hit this season? This isn't meant to be a trick question; let's assume the guy had at least 500 at bats in the previous season. Gates Brown and Shane Spencer need not apply. What's your best guess? .350? .340? Not likely. The evidence is overwhelming. Let's look at all hitters since WWII who hit .350 or better in at least 500 at bats; the only other requirement is that they had at least 250 at bats in the year following.

    This isn't meant to be a trick question; let's assume the guy had at least 500 at bats in the previous season. Gates Brown and Shane Spencer need not apply. What's your best guess? .350? .340? Not likely.

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    Dr. Chris Yeager: I finished my Ph.D. at Southern Miss and my study was on the biomechanics of the baseball swing--specifically the effect of the stride and weight shift in the swing. Based on that and my research is where I draw my philosophy and conclusions on how force is produced in the baseball swing.

    Dr. Chris Yeager is one of the brightest minds looking at the science of hitting. His scientific approach, based on the principles of physics, is detailed in a video he has made available. We spoke to him by phone from his home near the Mississippi Gulf Coast.

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