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Articles Tagged Velocity 

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09-14

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2

Team Chemistry: (If You) Can't Take The Heat
by
John Choiniere

05-27

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1

Raising Aces: Digging Under The Gun
by
Doug Thorburn

03-15

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8

Fantasy Freestyle: Spring Training Velocity Watch
by
Matt Collins

12-29

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0

Best of BP 2015: Setting Up the Spike
by
Brendan Gawlowski

11-25

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0

Raising Aces: Under the Gun 4.0, Part 2
by
Doug Thorburn

08-24

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8

Soft Toss: Setting Up the Spike
by
Brendan Gawlowski

04-14

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8

Moonshot: Does April Velocity Last?
by
Robert Arthur

03-28

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0

Changing Speeds: The Velocity Gainers and Losers of Spring 2014
by
Harry Pavlidis

03-07

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9

Raising Aces: Over the Radar 2.0
by
Doug Thorburn

03-03

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17

Raising Aces: Under the Gun 2.0
by
Doug Thorburn

10-30

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16

Baseball ProGUESTus: Is Speed Enough?: A PITCHf/x Look at the Effect of Fastball Velocity and Movement
by
Jonathan Hale

04-23

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2

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 187: More About Velocity Loss/Baseball Players and Appendectomies
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

04-09

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0

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 177: How Much Does Velocity Loss Matter?/The Astros' Runaway Strikeout Rate
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

04-01

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1

BP Unfiltered: The Velocity Gainers and Losers of Spring 2013
by
Harry Pavlidis

03-15

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6

The BP Wayback Machine: Do Spring Speeds Matter?
by
Mike Fast

03-15

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0

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 160: The Outlooks for Tim Lincecum and Roy Halladay
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

03-08

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22

Raising Aces: Under the Gun
by
Doug Thorburn

03-01

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25

Raising Aces: Over the Radar
by
Doug Thorburn

08-30

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1

BP Unfiltered: Is Stephen Strasburg Wearing Down?
by
Dan Brooks

08-03

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4

Raising Aces: Throwdown: Zack Greinke vs. Jeremy Hellickson
by
Doug Thorburn

07-14

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5

BP Unfiltered: Francisco Liriano's Unconvincing Impression of a Minnesota Twin
by
Ben Lindbergh

07-03

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2

BP Unfiltered: Just Sayin': Oliver Perez Might Be Back
by
Ben Lindbergh

06-15

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2

The Stats Go Marching In: Reaching Back for a Little Extra, Part Two
by
Max Marchi

06-12

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19

Baseball ProGUESTus: Scouting with PITCHf/x
by
Adam Foster

05-11

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1

The Stats Go Marching In: All About Velocity
by
Max Marchi

04-21

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3

Overthinking It: Washington's Gas Policy
by
Ben Lindbergh

05-03

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35

Prospects Will Break Your Heart: U Got the Look: Pitchers, Part I
by
Jason Parks

10-29

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9

Checking the Numbers: Quick Change Artistry
by
Eric Seidman

10-22

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9

Checking the Numbers: Crossing Over
by
Eric Seidman

10-05

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9

Checking the Numbers: Location and Perception
by
Eric Seidman

09-22

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35

Checking the Numbers: Perceived Velocity
by
Eric Seidman

04-23

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31

Checking the Numbers: Inside Pitch-f/x
by
Eric Seidman

04-02

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26

Checking the Numbers: Rest Up
by
Eric Seidman

03-03

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17

Is Consistency Key?
by
Eric Seidman

06-22

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0

Ballad of the Fatigued
by
Eric Seidman

06-09

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0

Ballad of the Fatigued
by
Eric Seidman

05-31

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0

Schrodinger's Bat: Physics on Display
by
Dan Fox

05-24

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0

Schrodinger's Bat: Batter Versus Pitcher, Gameday Style
by
Dan Fox

03-16

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0

Future Shock: Taking a Step Back, Part Three
by
Kevin Goldstein

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The extended exposure to high-end velocity should theoretically make hitters better against it. So, has it?

I’d like to start today by showing a chart way, way earlier than I (or anyone, probably) usually would. It’s going to break at least a few rules about proper graph-making (no title, unlabeled axes), but it’s worth it for the illustrated point. See if you can figure out what it shows, I’ll wait.

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How do we recalibrate our reliance on the radar gun for modern-day pitching evaluation?

A month ago, I was lamenting the modern development of today's pitchers, and a theme that was central to my position was that the present-day obsession with the radar gun has created an unhealthy paradigm shift in the ways that pitchers are bred, developed, and used at the highest level. I then spent the past couple weeks combing through the group of pitchers who have lost the most velocity, highlighting their radar-gun readings and the excellent resources at Brooks Baseball to better understand the trials and tribulations of some of the game's biggest hurlers.

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March 15, 2016 6:00 am

Fantasy Freestyle: Spring Training Velocity Watch

8

Matt Collins

A look at the hurlers who've seen their radar-gun readings perk up and dim down in Cactus and Grapefruit League play.

At this point, I think we all know that there is very little value to anything that happens in spring training. For fantasy purposes, the only thing we really need to pay attention to is injury news. There have been enough March superstars that turn into regular season duds to teach us to not get fooled again. With that being said, one thing we may be able to look into is spring training velocity. A few years ago, Mike Fast did a study for BP and found that there was some predictive value to velocity changes from the end of the previous season and the following spring. Now, there are usually some reasons for the changes that can’t be seen in the data, particularly with velocity decreases. Maybe the pitcher is hurt, or he’s a bit behind in schedule and is still building up his arm strength. It’s still a potential piece of information to seek out in a time where those instances are few and far between, so let’s take a look at a few pitchers who have seen some early spikes this year.

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A look at how different organizations approach the development of velocity in the minor leagues.

With the year winding to a close, Baseball Prospectus is revisiting some of our favorite articles of the year. This was originally published on August 24, 2015.

Four years into his professional career, Oakland’s Jose Torres was still a project. He’d shown some feel for pitching, but his mechanics were messy and his numbers had gone backward in his second spin through short-season ball. The A’s weren’t sure what to do with him in 2015.

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November 25, 2015 8:14 am

Raising Aces: Under the Gun 4.0, Part 2

0

Doug Thorburn

Continuing the examine the velocity changes that took place across the league in 2015.

Last week we took a look at the pitchers who have suffered the largest knocks to velocity in the 2015 season, and today we examine the other side of the coin.

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August 24, 2015 6:00 am

Soft Toss: Setting Up the Spike

8

Brendan Gawlowski

A look at how different organizations approach the development of velocity in the minor leagues.

Four years into his professional career, Oakland’s Jose Torres was still a project. He’d shown some feel for pitching, but his mechanics were messy and his numbers had gone backward in his second spin through short-season ball. The A’s weren’t sure what to do with him in 2015.

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April 14, 2014 6:00 am

Moonshot: Does April Velocity Last?

8

Robert Arthur

A look at how much April velo matters and the starting pitchers who are throwing faster or slower so far.

This early in the season, when the samples sizes are small and the conclusions fragile, attention tends to focus most especially on pitch velocity. That’s a reasonable thing to do, since velocity stabilizes quickly. Because velocity is the simple result of the acceleration a pitcher can impart to his pitch, it is not as affected by luck as, say, batting average or ERA (or even the advanced metrics like tAV or FIP). Moreover, velocity is of prime importance in predicting a pitcher’s future success.

Velocity is deceptively simple. It is only a single number, and yet it can explain multitudes about a pitcher: the kind of pitches he throws, how he gets hitters out, and in aggregate, the kind of pitcher he is. I set out to explore the early-season changes in velocity, and to what extent they are predictive of the season’s velocity.

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Harry identifies the starters who gained or lost the most speed between the end of 2013 and the beginning of 2014.

Three years ago, Mike Fast (now with the Houston Astros) took a look at pitchers who gained or lost velocity between the end of 2010 and spring 2011. We won't summarize his whole study here, but here’s the money quote:

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March 7, 2014 6:00 am

Raising Aces: Over the Radar 2.0

9

Doug Thorburn

A mechanical look at the pitchers who've gained the most fastball velocity over the last couple seasons.

This week, we’re focusing on pitch velocity and identifying the arms who have seen a big change in their fastball speeds over the last couple of years. On Monday, we looked at the players who are on the velocity downslope, with offerings that fall under the radar-gun readings of their past. Today we study the other side of the coin, drawing attention to those pitchers who have added fuel to their heat over the past couple of seasons.

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March 3, 2014 12:00 pm

Raising Aces: Under the Gun 2.0

17

Doug Thorburn

A mechanical look at the pitchers who lost the most fastball velocity last season.

When it comes to pitching, velocity is the straw that stirs the drink. Fastball speed provides the baseline for batter timing and sets up every other arrow in a pitcher's quiver, explaining why velocity is the most sought-after commodity in pitchers at every level of play. Consequently, it can be devastating when a big-league pitcher transitions from pumping premium octane to regular gas, as it slows the performance of the whole machine.

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Is there a sweet spot for velocity?

Most of our writers didn't enter the world sporting an @baseballprospectus.com address; with a few exceptions, they started out somewhere else. In an effort to up your reading pleasure while tipping our caps to some of the most illuminating work being done elsewhere on the internet, we'll be yielding the stage once a week to the best and brightest baseball writers, researchers, and thinkers from outside of the BP umbrella. If you'd like to nominate a guest contributor (including yourself), please drop us a line.

Jonathan Hale has been using PITCHf/x to answer baseball questions all over the 'net since 2008. He once missed a Duane Ward curveball by three feet. You can read his writing about the Blue Jays or tell him what he should be analyzing next at The Mockingbird.

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Ben and Sam discuss the velocity losses of some of baseball's best starters, then talk about whether players should have prophylactic appendectomies.



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