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Articles Tagged Undervalued Players 

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09-25

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1

Value Picks: First, Third, and DH Review
by
Michael Street

06-26

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6

Value Picks: First, Third, and DH for 6/26/12
by
Michael Street

02-28

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11

Everyone's Perfect: The Myth of Sleepers
by
Eriq Gardner

02-21

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26

Preseason Value Picks: First, Third, and DH for 2/21/12
by
Michael Street

10-14

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39

Doctoring The Numbers: Starting Them Young, Part Two
by
Rany Jazayerli

10-13

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57

Doctoring The Numbers: Starting Them Young, Part One
by
Rany Jazayerli

08-11

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19

The BP Trading Post: Middle-Infield Mayhem
by
Derek Carty

05-26

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20

Baseball ProGUESTus: Answers from a Sabermetrician, Part 2
by
Tom Tango

08-13

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8

Prospectus Q&A: On Trammell and Whitaker
by
David Laurila

04-23

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5

Ahead in the Count: Methodology of The New MORP
by
Matt Swartz

02-10

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2

Prospectus Q&A: Bruce Seid
by
David Laurila

12-29

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1

Prospectus Q&A: Eric Kubota
by
David Laurila

12-06

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0

Prospectus Q&A: Jim Beattie
by
David Laurila

06-07

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48

Prospectus Idol Entry: Yeah, That Girl Can Play
by
Brian Oakchunas

06-07

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43

Prospectus Idol Entry: The CJ Translations
by
Ken Funck

01-04

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6

Prospectus Q&A: Tony Blengino
by
David Laurila

03-11

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6

Prospectus Toolbox: Moneybag Mailball
by
Derek Jacques

12-02

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0

Prospectus Q&A: Neal Huntington
by
David Laurila

10-02

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0

The Week in Quotes: September 25-October 2
by
Alex Carnevale

06-05

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0

Doctoring The Numbers: The Draft, Part 12
by
Rany Jazayerli

03-21

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0

Who Are the AL-Kings?
by
Jonah Keri

09-08

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0

Crooked Numbers: The Bull in the Pen
by
James Click

03-25

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0

Fantasy Focus: Inflation in Keeper Leagues
by
Erik Siegrist

06-07

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2004 Amateur Draft Preview
by
Boyd Nation

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The former general sits down to talk about guiding a cash-strapped team, trading Pedro Martinez, and how much front offices have changed.

Jim Beattie won't be in Indianapolis for this year's Winter Meetings, but the erstwhile Expos and Orioles General Manager knows what goes on behind closed doors when his former brethren convene to talk trade. It was at the meetings 12 years ago that Beattie, then in charge of a financially-strapped Expos franchise, reluctantly laid the groundwork for trading Pedro Martinez to the Red Sox.

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Back in 2003, just after Toronto GM J.P. Ricciardi had cut over 20 million from Toronto's payroll and was still managing to moneyball his way to an 86 win season, some members of the Toronto press foolishly accused him of racism. The accusations, which concerned the racial make-up of the team, were so crudely conceived and without basis in reality that they are not worth going into here, but, ironically, Riccardi was so concerned with finding undervalued players at the time that he'd have surely gone after a certain race if those players were devalued simply because of their skin color. In other words, he'd have loved nothing better than to pick up all the best Negro League players in 1940.

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Most Baseball Prospectus readers are familiar with the challenge of putting together a fantasy baseball team. Owners spend weeks scouring various information sources (including BP's own Player Forecast Manager), sorting through hundreds of players to determine those that will be the most productive or are most likely to be undervalued by the dozen or so other owners in their league. Armed with their personal draft board, fantasy players then go through a structured draft or auction process, making decisions on the fly as certain needs get filled while others go wanting. It's an intense and rewarding process to winnow through so many variables, negotiate the complex draft-day tango, and wind up with a team you can use as a weapon with which to bludgeon your friends and enemies.

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January 4, 2009 11:33 am

Prospectus Q&A: Tony Blengino

6

David Laurila

The head of Seattle's new Department of Statistical Research elaborates on the ins and outs and evolution of baseball analysis.

A new era of Mariners baseball began when Seattle hired Jack Zduriencik as their general manager following the 2008 season, an era that will include an increased emphasis on statistical analysis. Helping to lead that charge will be Tony Blengino, who previously served as Milwaukee's assistant director of amateur scouting under Zduriencik, and now holds the title of special assistant to the general manager, baseball operations. A chief financial officer and author of the book Future Stars, before joining organized baseball in 2003, Blengino will head Seattle's newly created Department of Statistical Research. Blengino talked about his new role, and how the Mariners hope to build a championship-caliber team through a perfect marriage between traditional scouting and statistical analysis.

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Last week's Toolbox elicited a lot of responses, from thoughtful questions to additional observations.

I received a lot of good reader feedback on last week's column about Moneyball, so we'll stay with the topic for another week. Reader Mark Anderson starts us off on a factual note:

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Sitting down with the Pirates' new GM to talk about the philosophies hell bring with him from Cleveland, and his overall vision for Pittsburgh.

Neal Huntington has a challenge in front of him, but the 10-year veteran of the Indians front office has a plan in place to help resuscitate a moribund Pirates franchise that hasn't had a winning season since 1992--a plan that includes the utilization of performance analysis. Appointed as the team's new general manager in September, the 38-year-old native of Amherst, New Hampshire brings not only an extensive scouting and player development background to Pittsburgh, but also a deep understanding of sabermetrics.

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Managers--some already out the door--have the mike this week.

"Well, it's time to go. Just got a bad call from the umpires. They didn't want to reverse it."
--Frank Robinson, ex-manager of the Nationals, after his meeting with general manager Jim Bowden (Washington Post)

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June 5, 2006 12:00 am

Doctoring The Numbers: The Draft, Part 12

0

Rany Jazayerli

Rany closes out his epic series, identifying the new inefficiency in the market before tomorrow's Rule 4 draft.

Well, there's no reason to think that change suddenly ground to a halt in 1999, and the data from a decade ago may hold little bearing on the decisions that will be made next Tuesday.

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March 21, 2006 12:00 am

Who Are the AL-Kings?

0

Jonah Keri

Jonah Keri introduces us to the participants in Baseball Prospectus' Celebrity Scoresheet League.

Even the most die-hard Rotisserie player would stop short of calling the game a perfect proxy for the real thing, though. Roto's focus on statistics such as RBI, stolen bases, saves and wins are enough to make any card-carrying stathead scurry for the soothing comfort of his VORP tables. Luckily there are games that do a better job of replicating real-life baseball. Strat-O-Matic incorporates such elements as defense and strategic decisions (taking the extra base, bunting, hit-and-run plays) into its game. Strat does fall short in one element though, as it relies on the previous season's stats to generate the action. "What, Derrek Lee hit another three-run homer? Shocking!"

Scoresheet Baseball, on the other hand, combines realistic game results with current-year statistics. If Eric Chavez goes 11-for-24 in a given week, you get the benefit of that offensive outburst and Chavez's Gold Glove defense during the corresponding week on the Scoresheet schedule. Scoresheet has a few flaws too. It doesn't account for park effects for one, making Rockies hitters and Nationals pitchers appear more valuable than they are in reality. Still, it's a challenging, fun-to-play game that's a departure from traditional rotoball.

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September 8, 2005 12:00 am

Crooked Numbers: The Bull in the Pen

0

James Click

James tackles the divide between the way the mainstream media values relievers, and the way more advanced metrics do.

In his discussion of the likely NL MVP race shaping up, Joe Sheehan pointed out that if you look at the most prominent contenders--Derrek Lee, Albert Pujols, and Andruw Jones--Lee distances himself from the field in WARP by a vast margin. Looking at the traditional stats, Lee leads the league in batting average, Jones leads in home runs and RBI, and Pujols is second, third and second in those categories, respectively. It's easy to see why those three would be the favorites headed into the final month of the season.

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March 25, 2005 12:00 am

Fantasy Focus: Inflation in Keeper Leagues

0

Erik Siegrist

When $35 players are going for $55, you know you're seeing the impact of inflation. Here's how to anticipate it, and how to handle it.

In keeper leagues, however, there is a regulatory shadow cast over that heart. Well-drafted minor leaguers are locked up cheaply, below their perceived market value, and might not be up for bid until well into their primes. Similarly, a previous year's auction bargain could be hidden away, further tainting the market's essential purity.

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June 7, 2004 12:00 am

2004 Amateur Draft Preview

0

Boyd Nation

One of my all-time favorite college players was a Mississippi State pitcher from the early '90s named Jon Harden. I'm sure he was bigger than I remember him, but I'm guessing that he was somewhere around 5'9" and 165 pounds, though he played a bit smaller than that. On his best day with a full windup, his fastball touched 80 m.p.h., and he didn't really have much in the way of great breaking stuff as we usually think of it. What he did have, however, was three different, dancing changeups--he could throw, with the same identical motion, at 50, 60, 70, or 80 m.p.h., basically. Armed with that, he set a school record for appearances, serving quite successfully as the team's closer for the 1990 College World Series squad and then as the setup man when Jay Powell took over as closer in 1991. That combination in particular was absolutely deadly--you'd go from a starter with good heat, to a couple of innings of Harden's swooping changeups, to Powell, who could throw through the backstop at that point in his career. One of my favorite memories is of watching Harden throw to LSU's Lyle Mouton, who was already huge, and simply screw him into the ground in frustration as he guessed, flailed, and missed. Harden never really got any attention from organized baseball because of his size and his unusual approach. He was undrafted, and he was a bit too early for the independent leagues. At that time, there was an independent team in one of the Western minor leagues, and he pitched with them for a couple of seasons before giving it up. The last time I heard, he was pitching semipro ball and getting on with his life. I doubt that he would have done that much in the pros, but he would have been worth a low-A roster slot to find out.

Harden never really got any attention from organized baseball because of his size and his unusual approach. He was undrafted, and he was a bit too early for the independent leagues. At that time, there was an independent team in one of the Western minor leagues, and he pitched with them for a couple of seasons before giving it up. The last time I heard, he was pitching semipro ball and getting on with his life. I doubt that he would have done that much in the pros, but he would have been worth a low-A roster slot to find out.

Times are changing, though, and there's getting to be a spot for the unusual among us in organized baseball. Last year, for example, the Blue Jays took center fielder Jayce Tingler in the 10th round out of Missouri. Tingler's 5'7" if he really stretches, but he performed OK last year, well enough to get bumped on up to the Florida State League this year. As teams look for the undervalued, guys like Tingler will get more chances. I've already talked about this year's version of Tingler--Ryan Jones of East Carolina, in the 1A section of the preview--but here are some guys who are probably a bit undervalued for other reasons:

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