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Articles Tagged Two Strikes 

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08-09

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1

BP Unfiltered: Yu Darvish with Two Strikes
by
Dan Brooks

02-23

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19

Future Shock: Arizona Diamondbacks Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

02-20

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40

Future Shock: Tampa Bay Rays Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

01-18

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16

Heartburn Hardball: The Hawk and the Dragon
by
Jonathan Bernhardt

10-31

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33

World Series Prospectus: A Card Fought Win
by
Jay Jaffe

10-31

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22

Playoff Prospectus: Shuffling Through the World Series
by
Jason Parks

10-25

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35

World Series Prospectus: Mixed-Up Confusion
by
Jay Jaffe

10-24

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11

Prospectus Hit and Run: Mr. Holland's Opus
by
Jay Jaffe

10-19

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23

World Series Prospectus: The Midwest Showdown
by
Baseball Prospectus

10-04

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1

Playoff Prospectus: ALDS Game Three: Not Such a Pitchers' Duel
by
Jay Jaffe

10-03

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28

Playoff Prospectus: ALDS Game Two: Aye-yi-yala!
by
Jay Jaffe

09-30

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21

Baseball ProGUESTus: A New Take on Plate Discipline--Redefining the Zone
by
Matt Lentzner

09-28

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11

Prospectus Hit and Run: A Night in the Life of Team Entropy
by
Jay Jaffe

09-24

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71

Spinning Yarn: Removing the Mask Encore Presentation
by
Mike Fast

08-26

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4

Baseball ProGUESTus: Do Pitchers Really Trade Speed for Command?
by
Graham Goldbeck

08-04

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11

Wezen-Ball: Analyzing "Six-Man Baseball"
by
Larry Granillo

08-04

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1

The Asian Equation: Finding Relief from NPB
by
Michael Street

07-20

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14

Spinning Yarn: A Zone of Their Own
by
Mike Fast

07-08

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1

Prospectus Hit and Run: Chasing the Chase
by
Jay Jaffe

06-17

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6

Prospectus Hit and Run: No Prospectin' Allowed
by
Jay Jaffe

05-19

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4

The BP Wayback Machine: Baseball in 1864
by
Clay Davenport

04-27

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9

Spinning Yarn: A Soria Subject
by
Mike Fast

02-22

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38

Future Shock: Tampa Bay Rays Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

02-08

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44

Future Shock: Atlanta Braves Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

01-13

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23

Future Shock: Detroit Tigers Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

11-08

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71

Future Shock: Pittsburgh Pirates Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

10-23

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8

One-Hoppers: ALCS Notebook: You've Never Been This Far Before
by
Jay Jaffe

10-19

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1

Playoff Prospectus: Tuesday LCS Pitching Matchups
by
Matt Swartz

07-27

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9

Cracking the Pitch Sequence Code
by
Will Woods

06-23

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9

Prospectus Hit and Run: Consider The K
by
Jay Jaffe

06-18

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2

One-Hoppers: Game Story: Phillies at Yankees, June 17
by
Jay Jaffe

04-20

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8

Another Look: Remembering Chico Ruiz
by
Bob Hertzel

02-08

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40

Future Shock: Dodgers Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

11-25

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14

Prospectus Today: Pen Men Free Agents Review
by
Joe Sheehan

11-20

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1

Prospectus Q&A: Lou Marson and David Huff
by
David Laurila

11-05

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22

Prospectus Hit and Run: Anatomy of a Championship
by
Jay Jaffe

11-03

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8

Prospectus Hit and Run: Shorting Out
by
Jay Jaffe

10-29

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6

Prospectus Hit and Run: From One to the Other
by
Jay Jaffe

10-26

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49

Prospectus Today: Turning the Trick in Six
by
Joe Sheehan

09-29

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9

Ahead in the Count: Pitcher BABIP by Count
by
Matt Swartz

07-24

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52

Prospectus Today: Perfection
by
Joe Sheehan

05-24

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31

Prospectus Idol Entry: The Importance of Throwing First Pitch Strikes
by
Brian Oakchunas

05-17

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12

Prospectus Q&A: Jim Palmer
by
David Laurila

05-01

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8

Checking the Numbers: Whiffery
by
Eric Seidman

04-23

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31

Checking the Numbers: Inside Pitch-f/x
by
Eric Seidman

12-04

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13

Future Shock: Dodgers Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

11-03

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18

Future Shock: Diamondbacks Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

10-15

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5

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Comeback Kings
by
Jay Jaffe

10-07

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12

Playoff Diary
by
Christina Kahrl

07-26

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0

Prospectus Preview: Saturday's Games to Watch
by
Caleb Peiffer

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September 28, 2011 5:00 am

Prospectus Hit and Run: A Night in the Life of Team Entropy

11

Jay Jaffe

The playoff races have been de-zombified, and Team Entropy was on the prowl, looking for meaningful baseball going into the final game.

Welcome to Team Entropy! Grab a seat on the couch, and here, have a beer. You've been invited to this party because after almost exactly six months and 160 games of regular-season baseball, you've suspended the need to root for a specific team and are working for the greater good, more interested in maximizing the amount of end-of-season chaos the remaining schedule can produce. The amount of season, even, if it comes to a 163rd game—or two.

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In case you missed Mike Fast's extraordinary research into quantifying the heretofore hidden contributions of catchers, we're moving it back to the top of the list for the weekend.

I Was Framed
Catchers play a central role in the game of baseball through their involvement with every pitch that their pitchers throw. One of their key tasks is receiving borderline pitches without discouraging the umpire from calling strikes.


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Taking an old piece of baseball advice to task with Sportvision's new COMMANDf/x system for tracking the catcher's glove.

Believe it or not, most of our writers didn't enter the world sporting an @baseballprospectus.com address; with a few exceptions, they started out somewhere else. In an effort to up your reading pleasure while tipping our caps to some of the most illuminating work being done elsewhere on the internet, we'll be yielding the stage once a week to the best and brightest baseball writers, researchers and thinkers from outside of the BP umbrella. If you'd like to nominate a guest contributor (including yourself), please drop us a line.

Graham Goldbeck is a data analyst at Sportvision, the company behind PITCHf/x, HITf/x, COMMANDf/x, and FIELDf/x. In the past, Graham was a writer for the website Beyond the Boxscore and worked as a baseball operations intern for the Oakland Athletics and Tampa Bay Rays.

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Breaking down the pluses and minuses of a "six-man baseball" game, a game explained in a 1939 issue of "Popular Mechanics".

I don't think I'm stretching anything to say that most baseball fans know what it's like to play a game of baseball with too few people. Depending on just how many kids were available, we might play a game with no third baseman and only two outfielders or, if players were really limited, we'd have only one player in the outfield and rely on ghostrunners to run the bases. It wouldn't be unheard of to make all of rightfield off limits as well. You make do with what you have, right?

Along those same lines comes a version of baseball that I've never seen before. It was featured in the December 1939 issue of Popular Mechanics and was invented by Stephen Epler to allow smaller groups of players to play games quicker. Epler had, five years previously, invented a game called "six-man football" so, naturally, he also came up with "six-man baseball". From the magazine:

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August 4, 2011 12:17 am

The Asian Equation: Finding Relief from NPB

1

Michael Street

In his fifth Asian Equation column, Michael looks at the relievers who have enjoyed modest success--and failure--making the move from Japan to America.

The last group in my analysis of the player’s who have migrated to MLB from Nippon Professional Baseball (NPB) are the relievers, the least appreciated members of a successful baseball team. Yet, of all NPB imports, they have been the most numerous (explaining the length of this article, for which I apologize in advance) and the cheapest. Diminished quality is the most obvious reason for these extremes, since starters who don’t meet MLB standards get shifted to the bullpen, and lesser talents also keep salaries down. Additionally, the typical NPB pitcher’s arsenal matches well with an MLB reliever’s skillset.

As I discussed in my last Asian Equation article, NPB is a breaking ball league, which translates better to relief than starting. A good breaking ball might fool major league hitters the first or second time they see it in a game, but it probably won’t the third or fourth time. As an illustration, here’s how batter OPS rises against two of the biggest NPB starting-pitcher busts as compared with three current MLB pitchers: the best, the most mediocre, and an old junkballer. While MLB batters’ performance improves against each pitcher the more times they see him in a game, the change is far more dramatic with Matsuzaka and Kawakami.

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As Jose Bautista can attest, the percentage of pitches a batter sees in the strike zone tells us a good deal about his capabilities.

The pitcher begins each confrontation with a batter with the initiative. He alone controls when the baseball is thrown, how it moves, and where it is located. Thus, the batter is by nature placed in a reactive position. However, the batter, too, has a measure of control over how the plate appearance proceeds. He stands at the plate with a club, and it is within his discretion to swing his weapon or not.

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July 8, 2011 10:46 am

Prospectus Hit and Run: Chasing the Chase

1

Jay Jaffe

Jay looks at Derek Jeter's struggles trying to reach 3,000 hits and the corresponding struggles of his team last night.

It's not easy being Derek Jeter. Fresh off his 37th birthday, he is simultaneously on the precipice of making history—the first player to attain 3,000 hits as a Yankee, the 11th player to do so with a single team, and the 28th player to do so, period—and of being written off. Mere months after signing a three-year, $51 million deal (plus a player option) following a stretch of contentious negotiations, he is in the throes of the worst season of his 17-year career, his contract even more obviously an albatross than it appeared when he signed it. For a player who has always downplayed personal accomplishments in favor of team success, this is an uncomfortable time.

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A journeyman pitcher finds himself shuttling between teams and into the Yankees' rotation in a one-day span.

On Tuesday, Brian Gordon was a curiosity, a 32-year-old converted outfielder who had put up sterling numbers for the Phillies' Triple-A affiliate. One June 15 opt-out date, one well-timed rotation vacancy, and 5 innings of dogged labor later, he was the recipient of a well-earned standing ovation from a crowd of 47,487, and the newest member of the Yankees rotation. In the first major-league start of his career, the serendipitous starter held his own against a Rangers lineup that ranked fourth in the league in scoring, and while he left with the Yankees trailing 2-1, they ultimately won in 12 innings on a walk-off single by Brett Gardner, completing a sweep of the AL West leaders.

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Clay takes the field to get acquainted with the rules and regulations of your great-great-grandaddy's baseball.

While looking toward the future with our comprehensive slate of current content, we'd also like to recognize our rich past by drawing upon our extensive online archive of work dating back to 1997. In an effort to highlight the best of what's gone before, we'll be bringing you a weekly blast from BP's past, introducing or re-introducing you to some of the most informative and entertaining authors who have passed through our virtual halls. If you have fond recollections of a BP piece that you'd like to nominate for re-exposure to a wider audience, send us your suggestion.

Revisit Clay's account of a trip back in time to baseball's formative years, which originally ran on October 26, 2006.

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Do his early-season struggles suggest that Royals closer Joakim Soria's best days lie behind him, or can he succeed with a different style?

Joakim Soria has been one of the best relief pitchers in baseball over the past four years. From 2007 to 2010, he put up a 2.01 ERA with 281 strikeouts against only 70 walks and 182 hits in 255 innings. Over that period, he held the opposition scoreless in 82 percent of the games he entered, and he allowed multiple runs only five percent of the time. For comparison, Mariano Rivera had a 2.05 ERA over those four years, held the opposition scoreless 83 percent of the time, and allowed multiple runs five percent of the time. Even while fighting (and usually failing) to avoid the basement in the AL Central, the Royals could claim a truly elite closer in Soria, the rare All-Star on a perennial cellar dweller.

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February 22, 2011 9:29 am

Future Shock: Tampa Bay Rays Top 11 Prospects

38

Kevin Goldstein

The pipeline of talent keeps flowing with the always-impressive Rays system.

Previous Rankings: 2010 | 2009 | 2008

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The Braves are consistently among the best systems, and are again thanks to the game's most impressive collection of Latin American pitching talent.

Previous Rankings: 2010 | 2009 | 2008

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