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Articles Tagged Two Strikes 

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08-09

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1

BP Unfiltered: Yu Darvish with Two Strikes
by
Dan Brooks

02-23

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19

Future Shock: Arizona Diamondbacks Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

02-20

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40

Future Shock: Tampa Bay Rays Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

01-18

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16

Heartburn Hardball: The Hawk and the Dragon
by
Jonathan Bernhardt

10-31

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33

World Series Prospectus: A Card Fought Win
by
Jay Jaffe

10-31

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22

Playoff Prospectus: Shuffling Through the World Series
by
Jason Parks

10-25

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35

World Series Prospectus: Mixed-Up Confusion
by
Jay Jaffe

10-24

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11

Prospectus Hit and Run: Mr. Holland's Opus
by
Jay Jaffe

10-19

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23

World Series Prospectus: The Midwest Showdown
by
Baseball Prospectus

10-04

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1

Playoff Prospectus: ALDS Game Three: Not Such a Pitchers' Duel
by
Jay Jaffe

10-03

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28

Playoff Prospectus: ALDS Game Two: Aye-yi-yala!
by
Jay Jaffe

09-30

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21

Baseball ProGUESTus: A New Take on Plate Discipline--Redefining the Zone
by
Matt Lentzner

09-28

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11

Prospectus Hit and Run: A Night in the Life of Team Entropy
by
Jay Jaffe

09-24

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71

Spinning Yarn: Removing the Mask Encore Presentation
by
Mike Fast

08-26

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4

Baseball ProGUESTus: Do Pitchers Really Trade Speed for Command?
by
Graham Goldbeck

08-04

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11

Wezen-Ball: Analyzing "Six-Man Baseball"
by
Larry Granillo

08-04

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1

The Asian Equation: Finding Relief from NPB
by
Michael Street

07-20

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14

Spinning Yarn: A Zone of Their Own
by
Mike Fast

07-08

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1

Prospectus Hit and Run: Chasing the Chase
by
Jay Jaffe

06-17

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6

Prospectus Hit and Run: No Prospectin' Allowed
by
Jay Jaffe

05-19

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4

The BP Wayback Machine: Baseball in 1864
by
Clay Davenport

04-27

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9

Spinning Yarn: A Soria Subject
by
Mike Fast

02-22

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38

Future Shock: Tampa Bay Rays Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

02-08

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44

Future Shock: Atlanta Braves Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

01-13

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23

Future Shock: Detroit Tigers Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

11-08

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71

Future Shock: Pittsburgh Pirates Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

10-23

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8

One-Hoppers: ALCS Notebook: You've Never Been This Far Before
by
Jay Jaffe

10-19

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1

Playoff Prospectus: Tuesday LCS Pitching Matchups
by
Matt Swartz

07-27

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9

Cracking the Pitch Sequence Code
by
Will Woods

06-23

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9

Prospectus Hit and Run: Consider The K
by
Jay Jaffe

06-18

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2

One-Hoppers: Game Story: Phillies at Yankees, June 17
by
Jay Jaffe

04-20

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8

Another Look: Remembering Chico Ruiz
by
Bob Hertzel

02-08

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40

Future Shock: Dodgers Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

11-25

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14

Prospectus Today: Pen Men Free Agents Review
by
Joe Sheehan

11-20

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1

Prospectus Q&A: Lou Marson and David Huff
by
David Laurila

11-05

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22

Prospectus Hit and Run: Anatomy of a Championship
by
Jay Jaffe

11-03

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8

Prospectus Hit and Run: Shorting Out
by
Jay Jaffe

10-29

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6

Prospectus Hit and Run: From One to the Other
by
Jay Jaffe

10-26

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49

Prospectus Today: Turning the Trick in Six
by
Joe Sheehan

09-29

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9

Ahead in the Count: Pitcher BABIP by Count
by
Matt Swartz

07-24

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52

Prospectus Today: Perfection
by
Joe Sheehan

05-24

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31

Prospectus Idol Entry: The Importance of Throwing First Pitch Strikes
by
Brian Oakchunas

05-17

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12

Prospectus Q&A: Jim Palmer
by
David Laurila

05-01

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8

Checking the Numbers: Whiffery
by
Eric Seidman

04-23

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31

Checking the Numbers: Inside Pitch-f/x
by
Eric Seidman

12-04

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13

Future Shock: Dodgers Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

11-03

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18

Future Shock: Diamondbacks Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

10-15

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5

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Comeback Kings
by
Jay Jaffe

10-07

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12

Playoff Diary
by
Christina Kahrl

07-26

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0

Prospectus Preview: Saturday's Games to Watch
by
Caleb Peiffer

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Yu Darvish is taking a different approach with two strikes than he did toward the start of the season.

One way to look at how a pitcher attacks hitters is to look at what the pitcher throws in two-strike counts. In two-strike counts, pitchers often try to put hitters away with a breaking ball, induce weak contact with a sinker, overpower hitters with an extra-hard fastball, or throw a changeup with a bit of extra screw action.

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February 23, 2012 3:00 am

Future Shock: Arizona Diamondbacks Top 11 Prospects

19

Kevin Goldstein

The D'Backs system is loaded high-ceiling arms, which could stand to benefit a team weak in pitching

Previous Rankings: 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

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February 20, 2012 3:00 am

Future Shock: Tampa Bay Rays Top 11 Prospects

40

Kevin Goldstein

Once the crown jewel of the franchise, the Rays system has fallen off quite a bit thanks to unsuccessful drafts

Previous Rankings: 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

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January 18, 2012 3:00 am

Heartburn Hardball: The Hawk and the Dragon

16

Jonathan Bernhardt

After starring for opposing teams in the Japan Series, Wei-Yin Chen and Tsuyoshi Wada will try to adjust to life in Baltimore and last place, as the Orioles react to the new CBA by plugging their pitching holes with Asian imports.

On November 12th, 2011, as Major League Baseball recovers from one of the most exciting World Series in recent memory, Nippon Professional Baseball begins its own best-of-seven championship: the Japan Series.

Much like MLB, Japanese professional baseball has two leagues—the Central and the Pacific—and much like MLB, the champions of those respective leagues play each other to determine a final champion for the entire season. As NPB has only 12 teams compared to to MLB's 30, however, the playoffs are structured a bit differently; with only six teams per league, NPB does not bother with divisions or Wild Cards—the best three teams in each league make the playoffs, with the league's top seed getting a first-round bye. The second and third seeds play a best-of-three series, and the winner faces the first seed in a best-of-five “Climax Series” that's roughly analogous to MLB's League Championship Series. The winning club from each league's Climax Series is that league's champion and advances to the best-of-seven Japan Series to determine which is the best club in NPB. The Climax Series format was implemented first by the Pacific League in 2004 and then adopted by the Central League three years later. Previously, there had been no real postseason in NPB: the team with the best season record from the Central would play the team with the best season record from the Pacific in the Japan Series, and that was that.

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While anticlimactic after Game Six, the final game of the World Series capped off one of the most exciting postseasons in recent memory

That Game Seven of the 2011 World Series couldn't match the drama of Game Six was almost a given even before the first pitch was thrown. We don't talk about the finales of the 1975 or 1986 World Series in the same reverential tones as we do their penultimate contests, great though they may have been on their own merits. So unsurprisingly, we were not treated to a Jack Morris-level performance or an extra-inning walk-off win to complete the neat historical parallel provided by the Buck family’s "We'll see you tomorrow night!" calls following game-winning homers. Nonetheless, the first Game Seven in nine years required one more come-from-behind effort—down 2-0 before their starter had retired a single hitter—as well as heroics from some familiar names for the Cardinals to complete one of the most unlikely comebacks in baseball history en route to winning their 11th world championship via a 6-2 win over the Rangers.

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October 31, 2011 9:00 am

Playoff Prospectus: Shuffling Through the World Series

22

Jason Parks

A humor-tinged recap of one of the most exciting World Series of our generation

Track #1: Iron Maiden: “The Duelist”
“Ready to start the duel begins the best man wins in the end.
A lunge and a feint, a parry too late
A cut to the chest and you're down
Seeing the stain then feeling the pain
Feeling the sweat on your brow.”






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October 25, 2011 5:15 am

World Series Prospectus: Mixed-Up Confusion

35

Jay Jaffe

A series of questionable moves, bloopers, and blown calls to the bullpen were pertinent in the outcome of Game Five.

Given not only his history but the clinic in bullpen management that Tony La Russa put on in the NLCS, it’s difficult to believe that he could wind up botching a situation as badly as he did in the eighth inning of Monday's Game Five of the World Series. But thanks to a miscommunication between the Cardinals' dugout and their bullpen, a manager who has spent his career chasing the platoon advantage ad nauseam was left with lefty Marc Rzepczynski facing righty Mike Napoli with the bases loaded and one out. Meanwhile, the pitcher he wanted to face the Rangers' best hitter at the game’s pivotal moment wasn't even warmed up. Napoli, whose three-run homer had broken the game open the night before, pounded a double off the right-center field wall, breaking a 2-2 tie and helping the Rangers take a 3-2 lead in the Series.

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With the Rangers reeling from a Pujolsian pounding, young lefty Derek Holland helped right the ship in Game Four.

On Saturday night, Albert Pujols put together the best single-game offensive performance in World Series history as the Cardinals piled up 16 runs against the Rangers. On Sunday night, Pujols and friends couldn't buy a run and could scarcely collect a hit. The eight St. Louis batters besides Lance Berkman combined to go 0-for-25 as Derek Holland and Neftali Feliz combined on a two-hit shutout. Backed by Josh Hamilton's first extra-base hit of the Series and a three-run homer by Mike Napoli, the Rangers evened things up at two games apiece with a 4-0 win.

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Sizing up every facet of each contender in this season's Fall Classic.

The Breakdown

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October 4, 2011 4:19 pm

Playoff Prospectus: ALDS Game Three: Not Such a Pitchers' Duel

1

Jay Jaffe

A look at how the Tigers snatched Game 3 from the Bronx Bombers

On Sunday, it was Miguel Cabrera, one of the league's best hitters, beating Freddy Garcia, a back-of-the-rotation survivor. On Monday, it was Brandon Inge, Ramon Santiago, and Don Kelly outlasting CC Sabathia, the Yankees ace, with Delmon Young delivering a late kick to the sternum of the Bronx Bombers' bullpen. By stars and by scrubs, the Tigers have taken a 2-1 lead over the Yankees in the AL Division Series, and they stand one A.J. Burnett start away from knocking the league's number one seed out of the postseason.

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October 3, 2011 9:00 am

Playoff Prospectus: ALDS Game Two: Aye-yi-yala!

28

Jay Jaffe

Joe Girardi's questionable moves during Game Two may have cost the Yankees a commanding 2-0 series lead.

You're Joe Girardi, manager of the Yankees, the AL's second-highest scoring team this year, and the one that led the majors in home runs. You're sitting on a 1-0 lead in the Division Series against the Tigers because the night before, your lineup exploded for six runs in the sixth inning against a flagging starter. Of your A-list relievers, David Robertson and Rafael Soriano last pitched five days ago, while Mariano Rivera has gotten four outs in three appearances over the past week. You're down 4-0 in the seventh inning of this contest, but you've got two on and one out with your number-nine hitter, Brett Gardner, coming to the plate. Gardner has been struggling (.223/.320/.313 since July 31), but his two-run single broke open Game One, and he lined out in his last at-bat. After him, you have Derek Jeter, who is 0-for-3 but had two hits late Saturday night, followed by Curtis Granderson and Robinson Cano, your two most dangerous hitters this season.

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Is the traditional strike-ball dichotomy too simplistic?

Believe it or not, most of our writers didn't enter the world sporting an @baseballprospectus.com address; with a few exceptions, they started out somewhere else. In an effort to up your reading pleasure while tipping our caps to some of the most illuminating work being done elsewhere on the internet, we'll be yielding the stage once a week to the best and brightest baseball writers, researchers and thinkers from outside of the BP umbrella. If you'd like to nominate a guest contributor (including yourself), please drop us a line.

Matt Lentzner has carved out a (very) small niche in the baseball analysis world by examining the intersection of physics and biomechanics. He has presented at the PITCHf/x conference in each of the last two years and has written articles for The Hardball Times, as well as a previous article for Baseball Prospectus. When he’s not writing, Matt works on his physics-based baseball simulator, which is so awesome and all-encompassing that it will likely never actually be finished, though it does provide the inspiration for most of his articles and presentations. In real life, he’s an IT Director at a small financial consulting company in the Silicon Valley and also runs a physical training gym in his backyard on the weekends.

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