CSS Button No Image Css3Menu.com

Baseball Prospectus home
  
  
Click here to log in Click here for forgotten password Click here to subscribe

Premium and Super Premium Subscribers Get a 20% Discount at MLB.tv!

Articles Tagged Trevor Hoffman 

Search BP Articles

All Blogs (including podcasts)

Active Columns

Authors

Article Types

Archives

02-24

comment icon

6

Prospectus Hit and Run: Big Shoes to Fill
by
Jay Jaffe

09-20

comment icon

14

The BP Broadside: Oh, To Live on Closer Mountain
by
Steven Goldman

05-26

comment icon

5

The BP Wayback Machine: How Do You Rate Relief?
by
Nate Silver

01-14

comment icon

0

On the Beat: Reflecting on Trevor Hoffman
by
John Perrotto

01-13

comment icon

23

Prospectus Hit and Run: Trevor Hoffman and the Coming Wave
by
Jay Jaffe

11-19

comment icon

9

Warning Track Power: To Play Or Not To Play: Pitcher Edition
by
Chase Gharrity

09-10

comment icon

7

On the Beat: Going Out with Class
by
John Perrotto

05-31

comment icon

6

Memorial Day Remembrance: Cooper Brannan
by
Stephani Bee

05-21

comment icon

9

On the Beat: Ken Macha's Quandary
by
John Perrotto

03-24

comment icon

7

Team Health Reports: Milwaukee Brewers
by
Brad Wochomurka

11-10

comment icon

0

The Week in Quotes: November 3-9
by
Alex Carnevale

01-04

comment icon

0

The Class of 2008
by
Jay Jaffe

10-02

comment icon

0

Prospectus Today: The Men in Black Attack
by
Joe Sheehan

09-19

comment icon

0

Prospectus Today: Holy ****!
by
Joe Sheehan

09-12

comment icon

0

Prospectus Today: Dueling Righties
by
Joe Sheehan

12-14

comment icon

0

Transaction Analysis: December 7-13
by
Christina Kahrl

11-16

comment icon

0

Prospectus Notebook: Reds, Padres
by
Baseball Prospectus

09-08

comment icon

0

Crooked Numbers: The Bull in the Pen
by
James Click

05-12

comment icon

0

Prospectus Triple Play: Boston Red Sox, Cincinnati Reds, San Diego Padres
by
Jason Karegeannes

01-06

comment icon

0

Lies, Damned Lies: How Do You Rate Relief?
by
Nate Silver

04-22

comment icon

0

Prospectus Triple Play: Boston Red Sox, Cincinnati Reds, San Diego Padres
by
Baseball Prospectus

02-15

comment icon

0

Under The Knife: Closer Update
by
Will Carroll

01-18

comment icon

0

Under The Knife: The Silence of the M's
by
Will Carroll

10-29

comment icon

0

1998 Internet Baseball Awards Results
by
Greg Spira

<< Previous Tag Entries No More Tag Entries

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

February 24, 2012 3:00 am

Prospectus Hit and Run: Big Shoes to Fill

6

Jay Jaffe

What kind of production do teams receive from players tabbed to replace superstars?

Earlier this week, Mariano Rivera arrived at the Yankees' spring training facility in Tampa, Florida, and caused a stir by strongly hinting that the 2012 season would be his final one. The 42-year-old, who has served as the Yankees’ closer since 1997, has shown no signs of slippage, with four straight seasons of ERAs under 2.00 backed by stellar peripherals—strikeout and walk rates better than his career numbers, even—and high save totals. Late last season, he surpassed Trevor Hoffman as the all-time saves leader, and with five World Series rings in hand, the only real challenge that remains is for him to convince manager Joe Girardi to allow him a cameo in center field.

The rest of this article is restricted to Baseball Prospectus Subscribers.

Not a subscriber?

Click here for more information on Baseball Prospectus subscriptions or use the buttons to the right to subscribe and get access to the best baseball content on the web.


Cancel anytime.


That's a 33% savings over the monthly price!


That's a 33% savings over the monthly price!

Already a subscriber? Click here and use the blue login bar to log in.

Despite the barkers, the colored balloons, and Mariano Rivera, there is no Closer Mountain.

As Mariano Rivera tied and then broke Trevor Hoffman’s record for career saves, the YES Network’s Michael Kay kept referring to Rivera being “alone atop the mountain of closers.” Sometimes he said “alone atop the mountain of closers with Trevor Hoffman,” which doesn’t make much sense, because how can you be alone with somebody except in literary depictions of alienated romance, presumably not what Kay was talking about? In any case, Closer Mountain is more aptly described as a pimple, because most closers last about as long as the typical skin blemish and are about as memorable no matter how many saves they have. Compared to Rivera (and Hoffman as well), they are no more than transients traveling between obscurity and obscurity.

Rivera has been the Yankees’ closer since 1997. In that time, he has had eight seasons of 40 or more saves. You well know that saves are a vastly overrated statistic due to the way they seem to indicate leverage but really don’t, so don’t take that as a measure of quality, but rather of the fact that someone felt he was worth running out there with a lead—with the exception of the occasional Joe Borowski ’07, you don’t get a chance to pile up that many saves while pitching poorly.

The saves are the secondary by-product of the two elements of Rivera’s game that make him so valuable: First, he’s simply an exceptionally good pitcher. His current 2.22 ERA ranks ninth all time, 1,200 innings and up division. Literally everyone above him pitched in the Deadball era. The closest pitcher who was primarily a reliever is the Hall of Famer Hoyt Wilhelm, who had a 2.52 ERA overall and 2.49 in 1872 1/3 innings as a reliever, just about all of which was compiled in a less challenging run environment than the steroidal 1990s and 2000s.

Read the full article...

As Mariano Rivera leaves his 1,000th appearance behind, see how he stacks up according to Nate's standards.

While looking toward the future with our comprehensive slate of current content, we'd also like to recognize our rich past by drawing upon our extensive online archive of work dating back to 1997. In an effort to highlight the best of what's gone before, we'll be bringing you a weekly blast from BP's past, introducing or re-introducing you to some of the most informative and entertaining authors who have passed through our virtual halls. If you have fond recollections of a BP piece that you'd like to nominate for re-exposure to a wider audience, send us your suggestion.

Before Goose Gossage got into the Hall of Fame and Mariano Rivera reeled off another six superb seasons, Nate turned his statistical eye on the bullpen in the following article, which originally ran as a "Lies, Damned Lies" column on January 6, 2005.

Read the full article...

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

January 14, 2011 11:30 am

On the Beat: Reflecting on Trevor Hoffman

0

John Perrotto

Reminiscing about the all-time saves leader, plus other notes from around the major leagues.

Trevor Hoffman saved 601 games in his 16-year career, more than any relief pitcher in history. Even if many in the sabermetric community believe the save is a relatively useless statistic for evaluating player performance, it is still impressive that Hoffman could stay on top of his game for that many years as a top-flight closer. 

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

The current career saves leader has left the building and ought to head to Cooperstown, but who else deserves to join him?

No sooner had Trevor Hoffman announced his retirement on Tuesday than the questions as to his Hall of Fame worthiness came into the conversation. With only five relievers already enshrined in Cooperstown, the ranks of the elected would appear to have plenty of room for the all-time saves leader, but then the same thing might have been said about Lee Smith a few years ago, and he has yet to crack the 50 percent threshold in his nine years on the ballot.

Read the full article...

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

November 19, 2010 9:00 am

Warning Track Power: To Play Or Not To Play: Pitcher Edition

9

Chase Gharrity

Looking at the decisions facing Andy Pettitte and Trevor Hoffman, and trying to get Billy Wagner to reconsider.

Every offseason, major-league executives, fans and rumormongers are met with storylines and situations involving free agents who are considering retirement prior to the upcoming season. To prevent any sort of Favre-ian ambiguity, this article will serve as a sort of indirect advisory notice to a few pitchers who are on the fence in regards to returning to play next season. By taking a look at a few of the metrics we have here at Baseball Prospectus, we’ll be able to see which players can expect to see their numbers improve or worsen in 2011, allowing us to give the named players a insightful nudge towards playing or towards retirement.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

September 10, 2010 8:00 am

On the Beat: Going Out with Class

7

John Perrotto

Trevor Hoffman finally reaches 600 saves then apologizes to his teammates, along with other news and notes form around the major leagues.

Trevor Hoffman is likely in the final weeks of his career. Though the Brewers reliever says he won't make a decision about retiring until after the season ends, all signs point to the 42-year-old all-time saves leader bringing an end to his 18-year career that began with the expansion Marlins in 1993.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

After being severely wounded as a Marine in Iraq, he returned home to pitch in the Padres' farm system.

Growing up in Houston, Cooper Brannan was a constant presence at the Astrodome. The original Killer B's—Jeff Bagwell, Derek Bell, and Craig Biggio—were his favorites. Like many children, he wanted to be a professional athlete, and he’d tell his parents that one day his dream would come true. The road to becoming a pro, though, had a few odd turns before coming to fruition.

Brannan was a three-year letterman in football and baseball at Highland High School in Gilbert, Arizona, where he had moved to live with his father. He had generated some interest from junior colleges, but was unsure of what direction to go. He had never been guided to pursue a college education or continue playing baseball, and high school graduation was upon him. He had not signed a letter of intent.

Read the full article...

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

May 21, 2010 8:18 am

On the Beat: Ken Macha's Quandary

9

John Perrotto

The Brewers' manager ponders what to do with struggling closer Trevor Hoffman, along with other notes from around the majors.

Even on a night when his team won for the first time in nearly two weeks, manager Ken Macha couldn't totally enjoy his Brewers breaking their nine-game losing streak.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Fantasy article. To read it, sign up today!

March 24, 2009 12:17 pm

Team Health Reports: Milwaukee Brewers

7

Brad Wochomurka

Few match the Brew Crew when it comes to keeping their players ready to go.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

Ask not what you can do for your country, Red Sox payroll is not controlled by Yankee payroll, and the fountain of youth is in Trevor's backyard.

BETWEEN BARACK AND A HARD PLACE

Read the full article...

January 4, 2008 12:00 am

The Class of 2008

0

Jay Jaffe

Wrapping up the review of this year's Hall of Fame ballot with a look at the bullpen stars being voted on.

Having covered the starting pitchers on the 2008 Hall of Fame ballot last time around, we turn JAWS on the final batch of players, the relievers.

When I first cobbled together the system that became JAWS, just two relievers were in the Hall of Fame: Hoyt Wilhelm and Rollie Fingers. Since then, that number has doubled with the elections of Dennis Eckersley and Bruce Sutter. Though there's plenty to quibble about with regards to the latter's election in 2006, it's become easier to sketch out a standard for relievers, particularly with our own Keith Woolner's development of the Reliever Expected Wins Added (WXRL) stat.

Read the full article...

<< Previous Tag Entries No More Tag Entries