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Articles Tagged Trade Deadline 

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07-31

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Advance Scouting Series: David Phelps
by
Javier Barragan

07-26

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Advance Scouting Series: Dan Straily
by
Scott Delp

07-25

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Advance Scouting Series: Jay Bruce
by
Scott Delp

07-25

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2

Advance Scouting Series: Jaime Garcia
by
Wilson Karaman

07-25

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4

BP Unfiltered: Advance Scouting Series: Trade Deadline Introduction
by
Craig Goldstein

08-15

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11

Tools of Ignorance: Why Was Chapman So Expensive?
by
Jeff Quinton

08-10

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5

Outta Left Field: Butterfly Effect-ing the Lefties
by
Dustin Palmateer

08-10

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Fantasy Freestyle: Trade Deadline Post-Mortem
by
J.P. Breen

08-09

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3

Cold Takes: Is There A Trade Tax?
by
Patrick Dubuque

08-08

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Prospectus Feature: Does 'Elite Closer' Mean Less Volatility?
by
Henry Druschel

08-06

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BP Bronx
by
Evan Davis

08-02

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Cold Takes: Get Hyped for the August Trade Period!
by
Patrick Dubuque

08-02

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3

Transaction Analysis: Richer Get Rich
by
Sam Miller, Christopher Crawford, Patrick Dubuque, Craig Goldstein and Wilson Karaman

08-02

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9

Transaction Analysis: The Penny-Pinching Pirates Pitching Parade
by
Jeff Quinton, Ben Carsley, Joshua Howsam, Gideon Turk, Craig Goldstein, Adam McInturff, Jeffrey Paternostro and Bryan Grosnick

08-02

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4

Transaction Analysis: Bruce Makes For a Crowded Metropolitan Area
by
Bryan Grosnick, Jeffrey Paternostro and Scooter Hotz

08-01

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BP Unfiltered: Every Danged Trade
by
BP Staff

08-01

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Transaction Analysis: Rollin' to the Wild, Wild West
by
J.P. Breen and David Lee

08-01

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Pebble Hunting: A Prayer For Daniel Hudson
by
Sam Miller

08-01

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Transaction Analysis: Andrew Miller Joins the Tribe
by
Bryan Grosnick, Christopher Crawford, Jarrett Seidler, Kenny Ducey and Adam McInturff

07-28

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7

Prospectus Feature: To Be Young (Is To Be Traded Unexpectedly)
by
Trevor Strunk

07-28

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6

The GM Trade Game!
by
Ben Carsley and BP Staff

07-27

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Cold Takes: Stuck With Him
by
Patrick Dubuque

07-27

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4

Pitching Backward: Valuing Relievers, in July and Otherwise
by
Jeff Long

07-26

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Transaction Analysis: Made For Joaquin
by
Bryan Grosnick

07-24

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BP Milwaukee
by
Nicholas Zettel

07-24

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BP South Side
by
James Fegan

07-23

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BP South Side
by
James Fegan

07-22

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14

The GM Trade Game!
by
Sam Miller and BP Staff

07-22

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Prospectus Feature: Good Deal?
by
Trevor Strunk

07-21

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Banjo Hitter: The Players Who Are Just Dying To Be Traded
by
Aaron Gleeman

07-21

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4

Rubbing Mud: Why the Yankees Should Sell Hard
by
Matthew Trueblood

07-20

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5

Two-Strike Approach: How Good Is Cleveland?
by
Cat Garcia

07-17

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6

Rubbing Mud: Another Look At Doyle, Smoltz, Andersen, Bagwell
by
Matthew Trueblood

07-14

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Banjo Hitter: Where These Terrible Twins Go From Here
by
Aaron Gleeman

07-11

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Rubbing Mud: Four Rays Pitchers and a Trade Deadline
by
Matthew Trueblood

06-26

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BP Bronx
by
Nicolas Stellini

06-18

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BP Milwaukee
by
Seth Victor

08-05

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2

The Quinton: Fantasy Trade Deadline Takeaways
by
Jeff Quinton

07-31

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Transaction Analysis: Relievers, Left and Right
by
R.J. Anderson, Christopher Crawford, Matthew Trueblood, Jeff Long, Dustin Palmateer and Kate Morrison

07-31

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BP Unfiltered: The 2015 Trade Deadline Transaction Analysis Thread
by
Baseball Prospectus

07-30

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The Quinton: Fantasy Trade Deadline Guide
by
Jeff Quinton

07-24

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What You Need to Know: July 24th, 2015
by
Daniel Rathman

07-21

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4

Closer Report: Trade Deadline Edition (Week 17)
by
Matt Collins

06-25

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3

Painting the Black: #HugWatch2015
by
R.J. Anderson

08-02

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19

Trade Deadline
by
Sam Miller and Tim Collins

07-31

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4

BP Unfiltered: The 2014 Trade Deadline Transaction Analysis Thread
by
BP Staff

07-31

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2

Fantasy Freestyle: Trade Deadlines and Systems of Thought
by
Jeff Quinton

07-30

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10

The Lineup Card: Nine Last-Minute Trades
by
Baseball Prospectus

07-30

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6

Dynasty Dynamics: Who We're Selling at the Deadline
by
Ben Carsley and Craig Goldstein

07-24

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7

Painting the Black: The Selling-the-Closer Myth
by
R.J. Anderson

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The Dodgers trade from a deep pool of young pitching to get 36-year-old sorta-like-an-ace Rich Hill, along with right fielder Josh Reddick.



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The Pirates trade two starters, get back two more, and come out two prospects shallower than they were at the start of the day.

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The Mets get a power hitter, but might just be adding to the glut at a few well-covered positions.

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A roundup of the 20-plus TAs at BP this week.

For your slight convenience, here are links to the 20-plus TAs we've done this week.

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The Giants add a power lefty for the bullpen, while the Brewers get that starting catcher they've been lacking for about 20 minutes.



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Daniel Hudson was almost traded late last week. It might have rescued the pitcher from baseball's version of hell.

On June 21st, having collected saves on three consecutive days, Brad Ziegler got the night off and the ninth inning belonged to Daniel Hudson. There are varying degrees to which the transfer of power in a bullpen is “real”—if the Diamondbacks had lost by 13 to Toronto that night, Hudson would have been like the Vice President who technically takes over as President while the real LOTFW undergoes dental surgery. But the game was close, and Hudson was brought into it, and he got three easy outs. He collected his first save and lowered his ERA to 1.55 on the season, and to 3.12 since the start of 2015, when Hudson’s status as One Of The Best Stories In Baseball took hold.

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After their deal for Jonathan Lucroy falls through, the Indians pivot and snag their new closer out of the Bronx.

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Nobody takes the brunt of trade deadline season like the fungible minor-leaguer.

As of the moment I’m writing this article, the hot stove is still largely simmering. Outside of the Cubs’ trade for Aroldis Chapman—which, let’s be clear, is fraught and distressing and weird and better handled by a bunch of women online than by me—the trade deadline has approached with more anticipation than action. Yes, Melvin Upton went to the Jays, and yes, we’ve seen the annual Struggling Reliever Swap happen as Drew Storen and Joaquin Benoit switched places, but so far none of the prospects that we cherish—pace, Gleyber Torres—have moved away, and most of the stars remain in place. And so we’re set to receive approximately 8,000 articles debating the relative merits of trading or keeping prospects, about the nature of team development, and about whether veteran rentals are overrated or not.

Thankfully, this is not one of those articles, though I’m sure that if you find any of those debates that break new ground, they’ll be here at Baseball Prospectus. What I’m mostly interested in here is breaking down what makes prospects such valuable chips, why elite prospects and non-elite prospects alike are treated like poker chips at this time of year. As far as I can tell, there are three reasons for why prospects are treated as fungible value: 1) They are largely forgotten by the players’ union; 2) They are out of sight and out of mind for a major-league club; and 3) They have no real say in where or when they are employed. All of these factors combine to make minor leaguers what Karl Marx might call the surplus labor army of Major League Baseball, the collection of underpaid, talented workers that help maintain management’s profitability. So, yes, before you ask, this is a bit of a polemic.

The polemic quality of this article was probably predicted by the first point in my list above, the critique of the Players Association. I actually think that the MLBPA is one of, if not the best player unions in the big four sports, if only for two provisos that make baseball its own unique animal when it comes to player salaries: the lack of a salary cap and guaranteed contracts. That’s huge, and only the NHL really comes close to getting as good a deal for its players. But the dark secret of the MLBPA is that it is a veterans-first organization. Minor leaguers have long lobbied for better working conditions and more competitive salaries, and in response MLB has scuttled their class action lawsuits and defined them as seasonal interns as opposed to employees (largely in contradiction to their own press on MiLB websites, but that’s another issue). And the union has stayed silent. The union that has successfully defended 5-and-10 rights, that has embedded the DH so fully as to be all-but-eventually translated to the NL, and the union that has spit in the face of reports of reduced team profit has refused to speak up for its most roundly trampled members. And, so, minor leaguers are paid relatively nothing past their bonuses, and are set to make relatively nothing for their first six minor-league years.

And let’s be clear, major-league baseball teams can afford to pay their high priced vets and their minor leaguers fairly; I find claims to the contrary laughable. But minor leaguers are just not considered a priority for the union, and, fittingly perhaps, they are not considered a priority for the big-league club either. Recall the then-panned James Shields for Wil Myers and Jake Odorizzi trade: the veterans in the Royals clubhouse didn’t know Wil Myers from Adam, and they knew James Shields was an (at that time) ace. Maybe Eric Hosmer or some of the very young players who remembered him from the minors shed a tear for their friend leaving, but by and large, any major-league clubhouse will trade any number of minor leaguers for a shot at a pennant or a World Series. The larger issues of abuse aside, I expect that no one in the Cubs’ clubhouse is mourning even the deeply talented Gleyber Torres now that they have a stronger bullpen. And this is natural, of course—minor leaguers are developing while you’re playing a game a day and trying desperately to keep up with the grind of the season. You’re of course not going to relate easily with them.

This leads to the third point, that both the union’s disinterest in and the players’ distance from minor-leaguers plays to management in general, and ownership in particular. Because for the team itself, minor leaguers represent a unique win-win scenario: keep them, and you have cheap talent even if they just fill a spot on your bench or even if they fill a spot on your Triple-A team; trade them and you can add to a playoff run without really losing anything that will impact you until a year or more down the pike. And no minor-league player has the ability to say no to a trade; you won’t hear about Yoan Moncada or Julio Urias holding up trade talks because they need to be convinced to drop their no-trade clause. And even if a prospect is traded into a worse situation—a hitter traded to San Diego, or a pitcher traded to Colorado—they simply have to suck it up and try to succeed in a worse spot. Prospects are truly fungible, from a financial standpoint and from a personnel standpoint.

Ownership depends on this flexibility of labor to maintain its profit margins. While I still maintain that ownership could pay minor leaguers what they deserve and still pull a profit, it’s undeniable that whatever profit they would pull would be less than it is now. And as MLB is run to be profitable first and foremost—though the exceptions to that would make for an interesting article themselves—there’s no real incentive for ownership to make things more comfortable for minor leaguers. Even management has little incentive, as flexibility in the labor pool allows them to make moves to win now and win later. And even major-league players are conditioned into thinking of the minor-league group of players as other than them, non-veterans, or even as unwanted competition. And so minor leaguers remain as the remainder in the system that helps grease the wheels of MLB; spare a thought for them this trade deadline. As fans, we probably owe them that much at least.

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July 28, 2016 6:00 am

The GM Trade Game!

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Ben Carsley and BP Staff

Our ATL GM plays hardball with his best trade piece.

Welcome to our second BP Trade Game of 2016, in which a BP staffer is granted one major-league baseballer and fields offers from plausibly interested GMs. Our cast today:

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Voting your conscience is awfully difficult as a baseball fan.

There’s a freedom in helplessness. Sometimes, the act of choosing gets in the way of life. Imagine the burden of infinite possibilities: the information cost of picking a new breakfast cereal each morning, scrolling through a Netflix queue that never folds back on itself. The burden of deciding which people you help (and which you don’t) with your charity foundation, the way you allocate your infinite resources during your still-finite time on this earth.

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The real world doesn't care about partial wins.

It’s that time of year again. That last week in July when we swear that teams lose all sense of things big and small and ship otherwise valuable prospects in exchange for late-inning relievers who will pitch a few dozen innings over the balance of the season. It’s a formula that the sabermetric community sometimes finds difficult to rationalize. Relievers pitch so few innings and are so volatile that their value is almost certainly lower than that of the prospects dealt for them.

It’s difficult to look at the trade returns for late-game specialists and understand the thought process. The Cubs seemingly traded a king’s ransom to acquire Aroldis Chapman, a pitcher whose performance is only marred by the domestic violence charges that hang over him. Let’s not mince words either; that marring very real and deserved. For the purposes of this article, though, we're be ignoring that component of this trade, not because it doesn’t matter—it matters immensely—but because it didn’t dramatically diminish his value in the baseball world, which is what this article is about.

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July 26, 2016 11:17 am

Transaction Analysis: Made For Joaquin

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Bryan Grosnick

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