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Articles Tagged Torii Hunter 

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04-18

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3

In A Pickle: Torii of Relativity
by
Jason Wojciechowski

11-19

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4

Overthinking It: All Quiet on the Free Agent Front
by
Ben Lindbergh

11-14

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13

Transaction Analysis: The Never-Ending Torii?
by
Sam Miller

11-13

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34

Out of Left Field: What $205 Million Buys on the Free Agent Market
by
Matthew Kory

11-05

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42

Painting the Black: The 50 Best Free Agents
by
R.J. Anderson

09-27

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2

The Prospectus Hit List: Thursday, September 27
by
Matthew Kory

09-27

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7

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 51: What the Rockies Knew About Ubaldo/The Eternal Torii Hunter/Declining Dan Haren
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

09-10

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12

BP Unfiltered: Angels in the Outer Field Area
by
Sam Miller

05-03

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4

On the Beat: The Prince and the Pauper Numbers
by
John Perrotto

05-01

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4

Western Front: As a Manager, He Makes a Good Right Fielder
by
Geoff Young

02-24

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6

Prospectus Hit and Run: Big Shoes to Fill
by
Jay Jaffe

12-27

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4

The Keeper Reaper: Outfielders for 12/27/11
by
Rob McQuown

08-25

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0

The Week in Quotes: August 18-24
by
Alex Carnevale

02-24

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0

Every Given Sunday: A New Angel in the Outfield
by
John Perrotto

11-26

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0

The Week in Quotes: November 19-26
by
Alex Carnevale

10-07

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0

Prospectus Q&A: Torii Hunter
by
David Laurila

07-15

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0

Every Given Sunday: Twins and Tweaks
by
John Perrotto

10-07

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0

Prospectus Today: Division Series, Day Four
by
Joe Sheehan

09-12

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0

Prospectus Game of the Week: Detroit Tigers @ Minnesota Twins, September 10, 2006
by
Derek Jacques

05-06

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0

Breaking Balls: Sixteen Innings of Bliss
by
Derek Zumsteg

10-23

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0

Internet Baseball Awards: AL Player of the Year
by
Greg Spira

10-01

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Playoff Prospectus: Oakland Athletics vs. Minnesota Twins
by
Derek Zumsteg

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Teams that are trying, getting brainy in Houston, Hankeriffic good times in Texas, and all the other notable quotables from the week that was.

WE'RE TRYING AS HARD AS WE CAN: WE'RE JUST FAILING REALLY BADLY

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February 24, 2008 12:00 am

Every Given Sunday: A New Angel in the Outfield

0

John Perrotto

The AL West's top contender didn't sit still this winter, while the D'backs, Mets, and Mariners are all raising the stakes.

Simply put, the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim just don't have the appeal of the American League's other top teams. The Boston Red Sox are the defending World Series champions. The Cleveland Indians are the scrappy team that pushed the champs to the brink last season before losing in seven games in the American League Championship Series. The Yankees have a modern-day murderer's row in their lineup, while the Tigers have one to match after trading for Miguel Cabrera in the offseason.

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A new Angel in the outfield expresses his excitement over the surprise partnership.

THE ANGELS MAY WANT TO CONSIDER A PSYCHIATRIC EVALUATION AS WELL

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October 7, 2007 12:00 am

Prospectus Q&A: Torii Hunter

0

David Laurila

Longtime Minnesota center fielder Torii Hunter sits down to talk free agency, fielding, and off-field accomplishments.

The current face of the franchise may have played his last game in a Twins uniform. Torii Hunter is now a free agent, having turned down a reported 45 million dollar contract offer that would have kept him in Minnesota for another three years. The popular Gold Glove center fielder is reportedly seeking a 5-year, 70 million dollar deal, making it unlikely that the cost-conscious Twins will be able to retain the services of their longest-tenured player. Hunter, who was acquired in the 1993 draft, hit .287/.334/.505 this season with 28 home runs and a career-high 107 RBI.

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The Twins say they're all in, while the Giants deliver a surprise or two. Plus the rumor mill's getting hotter as the July deadline approaches.

Ron Gardenhire stood in the ballroom of the St. Francis Westin Hotel this past Monday and watched as one of his star players entertained a horde of reporters for an hour during the media availability session held a day before the All-Star Game in San Francisco. "Gee, what do you think they're asking him?" Gardenhire, the Minnesota Twins' manager, said with a smile.

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October 7, 2006 12:00 am

Prospectus Today: Division Series, Day Four

0

Joe Sheehan

The A's won a Division Series, and they did it their way. The Tigers are one win away from joining them in an ALCS matchup no one predicted.

\nMathematically, leverage is based on the win expectancy work done by Keith Woolner in BP 2005, and is defined as the change in the probability of winning the game from scoring (or allowing) one additional run in the current game situation divided by the change in probability from scoring\n(or allowing) one run at the start of the game.'; xxxpxxxxx1160276734_18 = 'Adjusted Pitcher Wins. Thorn and Palmers method for calculating a starters value in wins. Included for comparison with SNVA. APW values here calculated using runs instead of earned runs.'; xxxpxxxxx1160276734_19 = 'Support Neutral Lineup-adjusted Value Added (SNVA adjusted for the MLVr of batters faced) per game pitched.'; xxxpxxxxx1160276734_20 = 'The number of double play opportunities (defined as less than two outs with runner(s) on first, first and second, or first second and third).'; xxxpxxxxx1160276734_21 = 'The percentage of double play opportunities turned into actual double plays by a pitcher or hitter.'; xxxpxxxxx1160276734_22 = 'Winning percentage. For teams, Win% is determined by dividing wins by games played. For pitchers, Win% is determined by dividing wins by total decisions. '; xxxpxxxxx1160276734_23 = 'Expected winning percentage for the pitcher, based on how often\na pitcher with the same innings pitched and runs allowed in each individual\ngame earned a win or loss historically in the modern era (1972-present).'; xxxpxxxxx1160276734_24 = 'Attrition Rate is the percent chance that a hitters plate appearances or a pitchers opposing batters faced will decrease by at least 50% relative to his Baseline playing time forecast. Although it is generally a good indicator of the risk of injury, Attrition Rate will also capture seasons in which his playing time decreases due to poor performance or managerial decisions. '; xxxpxxxxx1160276734_25 = 'Batting average (hitters) or batting average allowed (pitchers).'; xxxpxxxxx1160276734_26 = 'Average number of pitches per start.'; xxxpxxxxx1160276734_27 = 'Average Pitcher Abuse Points per game started.'; xxxpxxxxx1160276734_28 = 'Singles or singles allowed.'; xxxpxxxxx1160276734_29 = 'Batting average; hits divided by at-bats.'; xxxpxxxxx1160276734_30 = 'Percentage of pitches thrown for balls.'; xxxpxxxxx1160276734_31 = 'The Baseline forecast, although it does not appear here, is a crucial intermediate step in creating a players forecast. The Baseline developed based on the players previous three seasons of performance. Both major league and (translated) minor league performances are considered.

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Derek recaps a Santana-Bonderman duel with serious implications for the AL Central race.

The divisional race in the AL Central was thought to be over as recently as a month ago. On August 7, Detroit had a ten-game lead in the division. Since then, the Tigers have a 10-21 record. They've lost two out of their first three in a crucial four-game set against Minnesota. Meanwhile, in Chicago, the White Sox have taken two in a row from the extremely disappointing Cleveland Indians. Just like that, the AL Central race is now down to a three game lead, three and a half over the White Sox, the tightest race in the AL.

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I was at Safeco Field on Tuesday, watching a fast-moving game that was on pace to wrap up 3-2 Mariners in about two and a half hours, and ended up with one of the longest, craziest games I've ever attended. I scored this game. I've been working on an article about scoring and finding a good card to match your style, and thought I'd finally settled on one. This game, of course, became the torture-test for a scorecard:

The last great extra-innings game I'd been to was Blue Jays at Mets, at Shea, June 9th, 1999, a 14-inning marathon I enjoyed a lot. That one took four hours, 35 minutes. I blame Bobby Valentine, who failed to pinch-hit for Rey Ordonez over and over when it could have won him the game. It was a great time, though. I got to see the game with Melissa Hughes, who wrote some good baseball articles for a while (including some good and scary ones on baseball groupies and the Web sites of the adoring fan) and then quit writing about baseball.

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It's hard to say if the Baseball Writers Association will ever give Alex Rodriguez the MVP award he's due, but Internet Baseball Awards electors voted Rodriguez his second Internet AL Player of the Year award in 2002 by a decisive margin; he won almost 70% of the first-place votes.

It's hard to say if the Baseball Writers Association will ever give Alex Rodriguez the MVP award he's due, but Internet Baseball Awards electors voted Rodriguez his second Internet AL Player of the Year award in 2002 by a decisive margin; he won almost 70% of the first-place votes. He had previously won this award in 1996, while finishing second in 1998, 2000, and 2001. Miguel Tejada, who had never finished in the top twenty before, came in second as a result of his strong performance during the Athletics' 103-win season. Jason Giambi, the winner of the 2000 and 2001 Internet AL Player of the Years while with Oakland, finished third in his first year as a Yankee. Alfonso Soriano, who had a season not like any other in baseball history with its blend of strengths and weaknesses, finished a strong fourth, and had the third-highest total of first-place votes. Jim Thome, who has finished in the top fifteen seven of the last eight years, matched his highest-ever ranking with a fifth place finish. Torii Hunter's breakout season with the bat vaulted him into sixth place, while Manny Ramirez' seventh-place mark is the fifth year in a row he's finished in the top ten. Pedro Martinez, the winner of the 1999 Internet AL Player of the Year, was the highest ranking pitcher in ninth place, while the highest-rated reliever, Billy Koch, wound up in twenty-sixth place. Ichiro Suzuki, last year's BBWAA AL MVP--he finished fifth in Internet voting--wound up being twentieth in his second go-round. Derek Jeter finished outside the top fifteen for the first time since 1997. Seventeen of the top twenty players were on teams with at least a .500 record, while ten of the those seventeen made it into the playoffs.

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This is my favorite playoff series, if only because it's going to finally put the lie to Bud Selig's constant lament that no team in the lower half of payroll has ever advanced beyond the first round of the playoffs. The Twins and the A's were respectively 27th and 28th in ESPN's Opening Day payroll tally. I'm surprised that the right Honorable Commissioner didn't intervene and 'fix' the matchups in what he might see as the best interests of baseball. One of these teams will win three games and advance, only to be immediately heralded as an aberration, no matter what happens when they face the Yankees.

This is my favorite playoff series, if only because it's going to finally put the lie to Bud Selig's constant lament that no team in the lower half of payroll has ever advanced beyond the first round of the playoffs. The Twins and the A's were respectively 27th and 28th in ESPN's Opening Day payroll tally. I'm surprised that the right Honorable Commissioner didn't intervene and 'fix' the matchups in what he might see as the best interests of baseball. One of these teams will win three games and advance, only to be immediately heralded as an aberration, no matter what happens when they face the Yankees.

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