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03-05

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12

Top Tools: Best Slider/Changeup/Command
by
Mark Anderson and BP Prospect Staff

03-04

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34

Top Tools: Best Fastball/Curveball
by
Mark Anderson and BP Prospect Staff

03-03

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7

Top Tools: Best Catcher Defense/Catcher Arm
by
Mark Anderson and BP Prospect Staff

02-28

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22

Top Tools: Best Outfield Defense/Outfield Arm
by
Mark Anderson and BP Prospect Staff

02-25

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8

Top Tools: Best Infield Defense/Infield Arm
by
Mark Anderson and BP Prospect Staff

02-20

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63

Top Tools: Best Speed/Makeup
by
Mark Anderson and BP Prospect Staff

02-19

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20

Top Tools: Best Hit/Power
by
Mark Anderson and BP Prospect Staff

12-26

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2

Sobsequy: Why the Best Talent is Boring
by
Adam Sobsey

06-08

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0

The BP Wayback Machine: Taking a Step Back, Part Two
by
Kevin Goldstein

06-01

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0

The BP Wayback Machine: Taking a Step Back, Part One
by
Kevin Goldstein

03-09

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20

Future Shock: Phillies Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

03-06

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24

Future Shock: Rangers Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

02-28

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13

Future Shock: Milwaukee Brewers Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

02-24

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11

Future Shock: Detroit Tigers Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

02-23

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19

Future Shock: Arizona Diamondbacks Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

02-20

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40

Future Shock: Tampa Bay Rays Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

02-14

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24

Future Shock: Boston Red Sox Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

02-07

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12

Future Shock: Atlanta Braves Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

02-02

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33

Future Shock: Angels Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

01-30

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27

Future Shock: Los Angeles Dodgers Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

01-26

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45

Future Shock: Blue Jays Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

01-24

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38

Future Shock: Washington Nationals Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

01-19

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55

Future Shock: Indians Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

01-17

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48

Future Shock: Cincinnati Reds Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

01-16

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23

Future Shock: White Sox Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

01-10

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33

Future Shock: New York Mets Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

01-06

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75

Future Shock: Athletics Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

01-04

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19

Future Shock: Rockies Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

01-03

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27

Future Shock: Miami Marlins Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

12-16

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29

Future Shock: Pirates Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

12-13

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47

Future Shock: San Diego Padres Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

11-24

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42

Future Shock: Cubs Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

11-21

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36

Future Shock: Royals Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

11-15

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41

Future Shock: Baltimore Orioles Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

11-09

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35

Future Shock: Seattle Mariners Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

11-03

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37

Future Shock: Twins Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

11-01

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40

Future Shock: Astros Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

10-22

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17

Prospects Will Break Your Heart: El Califa: The 20/80 of a Taqueria
by
Jason Parks

09-14

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45

Prospects Will Break Your Heart: 2011 Minor-League Awards: Position Players
by
Jason Parks

08-23

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26

Prospects Will Break Your Heart: The Best of the Best
by
Jason Parks

08-11

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45

Prospects Will Break Your Heart: Positional Primacy: Center Field
by
Jason Parks

08-04

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32

Prospects Will Break Your Heart: Positional Primacy: Left Field
by
Jason Parks

07-07

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45

Prospects Will Break Your Heart: Positional Primacy: Third Basemen
by
Jason Parks

06-28

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54

Prospects Will Break Your Heart: Positional Primacy: Shortstops
by
Jason Parks

06-23

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29

Prospects Will Break Your Heart: Positional Primacy: Second Base
by
Jason Parks

02-25

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38

Future Shock: Philadelphia Phillies Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

02-16

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38

Future Shock: Minnesota Twins Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

02-10

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32

Overthinking It: Tooling Around
by
Ben Lindbergh

03-17

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23

Future Shock: Future Top Dogs, NL
by
Kevin Goldstein

01-26

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33

Future Shock: Reds Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

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March 5, 2014 6:00 am

Top Tools: Best Slider/Changeup/Command

12

Mark Anderson and BP Prospect Staff

The final installment of a seven-part series on the top tools in the minors.

Scouts spend countless hours watching and evaluating players, carefully considering the appropriate grade for each tool or each pitch a player offers. Throughout the course of the season and particularly throughout the course of ranking season, grades are tossed around with near reckless abandon. This player has plus power, and that player has a below-average fastball. This player offers above-average hit projection while that player buries hitters with a potential plus-plus curveball. It's easy to talk about the quality of an individual tool, but what does it all mean in the context of other players?

In the second edition of the annual Top Tools Series, the Baseball Prospectus Prospect Staff debated long and hard over how individual players’ tools stack up against those of their counterparts. Drawing upon our own eyewitness accounts and opinions from scouts across the league, the team debated and compiled the following ratings. The end result is a product that captures the oft-missing context of how individual player tools compare and who has the best of each tool in baseball.

The rest of this article is restricted to Baseball Prospectus Subscribers.

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March 4, 2014 6:00 am

Top Tools: Best Fastball/Curveball

34

Mark Anderson and BP Prospect Staff

Part six of a several-part series on the top tools in the minors.

Scouts spend countless hours watching and evaluating players, carefully considering the appropriate grade for each tool or each pitch a player offers. Throughout the course of the season and particularly throughout the course of ranking season, grades are tossed around with near reckless abandon. This player has plus power, and that player has a below-average fastball. This player offers above-average hit projection while that player buries hitters with a potential plus-plus curveball. It's easy to talk about the quality of an individual tool, but what does it all mean in the context of other players?

In the second edition of the annual Top Tools Series, the Baseball Prospectus Prospect Staff debated long and hard over how individual players’ tools stack up against those of their counterparts. Drawing upon our own eyewitness accounts and opinions from scouts across the league, the team debated and compiled the following ratings. The end result is a product that captures the oft-missing context of how individual player tools compare and who has the best of each tool in baseball.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

March 3, 2014 12:00 pm

Top Tools: Best Catcher Defense/Catcher Arm

7

Mark Anderson and BP Prospect Staff

Part five of a several-part series on the top tools in the minors.

Scouts spend countless hours watching and evaluating players, carefully considering the appropriate grade for each tool or each pitch a player offers. Throughout the course of the season and particularly throughout the course of ranking season, grades are tossed around with near reckless abandon. This player has plus power, and that player has a below-average fastball. This player offers above-average hit projection while that player buries hitters with a potential plus-plus curveball. It's easy to talk about the quality of an individual tool, but what does it all mean in the context of other players?

In the second edition of the annual Top Tools Series, the Baseball Prospectus Prospect Staff debated long and hard over how individual players’ tools stack up against those of their counterparts. Drawing upon our own eyewitness accounts and opinions from scouts across the league, the team debated and compiled the following ratings. The end result is a product that captures the oft-missing context of how individual player tools compare and who has the best of each tool in baseball.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

February 28, 2014 6:00 am

Top Tools: Best Outfield Defense/Outfield Arm

22

Mark Anderson and BP Prospect Staff

Part four of a several-part series on the top tools in the minors.

Scouts spend countless hours watching and evaluating players, carefully considering the appropriate grade for each tool or each pitch a player offers. Throughout the course of the season and particularly throughout the course of ranking season, grades are tossed around with near reckless abandon. This player has plus power, and that player has a below-average fastball. This player offers above-average hit projection while that player buries hitters with a potential plus-plus curveball. It's easy to talk about the quality of an individual tool, but what does it all mean in the context of other players?

In the second edition of the annual Top Tools Series, the Baseball Prospectus Prospect Staff debated long and hard over how individual players’ tools stack up against those of their counterparts. Drawing upon our own eyewitness accounts and opinions from scouts across the league, the team debated and compiled the following ratings. The end result is a product that captures the oft-missing context of how individual player tools compare and who has the best of each tool in baseball.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

February 25, 2014 6:00 am

Top Tools: Best Infield Defense/Infield Arm

8

Mark Anderson and BP Prospect Staff

Part three of a several-part series on the top tools in the minors.

Scouts spend countless hours watching and evaluating players, carefully considering the appropriate grade for each tool or each pitch a player offers. Throughout the course of the season and particularly throughout the course of ranking season, grades are tossed around with near reckless abandon. This player has plus power, and that player has a below-average fastball. This player offers above-average hit projection while that player buries hitters with a potential plus-plus curveball. It's easy to talk about the quality of an individual tool, but what does it all mean in the context of other players?

In the second edition of the annual Top Tools Series, the Baseball Prospectus Prospect Staff debated long and hard over how individual players’ tools stack up against those of their counterparts. Drawing upon our own eyewitness accounts and opinions from scouts across the league, the team debated and compiled the following ratings. The end result is a product that captures the oft-missing context of how individual player tools compare and who has the best of each tool in baseball.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

February 20, 2014 6:00 am

Top Tools: Best Speed/Makeup

63

Mark Anderson and BP Prospect Staff

Part two of a several-part series on the top tools in the minors.

Scouts spend countless hours watching and evaluating players, carefully considering the appropriate grade for each tool or each pitch a player offers. Throughout the course of the season and particularly throughout the course of ranking season, grades are tossed around with near reckless abandon. This player has plus power, and that player has a below-average fastball. This player offers above-average hit projection while that player buries hitters with a potential plus-plus curveball. It's easy to talk about the quality of an individual tool, but what does it all mean in the context of other players?

In the second edition of the annual Top Tools Series, the Baseball Prospectus Prospect Staff debated long and hard over how individual players’ tools stack up against those of their counterparts. Drawing upon our own eyewitness accounts and opinions from scouts across the league, the team debated and compiled the following ratings. The end result is a product that captures the oft-missing context of how individual player tools compare and who has the best of each tool in baseball.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

Part one of a several-part series on the top tools in the minors.

Scouts spend countless hours watching and evaluating players, carefully considering the appropriate grade for each tool or each pitch a player offers. Throughout the course of the season and particularly throughout the course of ranking season, grades are tossed around with near reckless abandon. This player has plus power, and that player has a below-average fastball. This player offers above-average hit projection while that player buries hitters with a potential plus-plus curveball. It's easy to talk about the quality of an individual tool, but what does it all mean in the context of other players?

In the second edition of the annual Top Tools Series, the Baseball Prospectus Prospect Staff debated long and hard over how individual players’ tools stack up against those of their counterparts. Drawing upon our own eyewitness accounts and opinions from scouts across the league, the team debated and compiled the following ratings. The end result is a product that captures the oft-missing context of how individual player tools compare and who has the best of each tool in baseball.

Read the full article...

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December 26, 2012 5:00 am

Sobsequy: Why the Best Talent is Boring

2

Adam Sobsey

And the best stories begin with more modest tools.

At the Trade Show during the Winter Meetings in Nashville, I was talking to a well-known baseball talent evaluator who writes for another publication. I can’t quite remember the exact subject of the conversation. We may have been talking about some college players he was high on. We may have been talking about Joe Dillon, who was standing a few feet away from us behind the D-Bat table (he’s now part of that company). Dillon was a classic career toiler, amassing over 4,000 minor-league plate appearances, scraping together a couple hundred big-league at-bats over four seasons, doing a stint in Japan, and losing an entire season—the one that would probably have given him his best chance at establishing himself in the majors—to injury (he officially retired). Only will and determination got him back in the game and another decade in uniform.

With Dillon and all he represents lurking behind us, the general subject of prospects—which was certainly the matter at hand, since that is always the only and ultimate topic of conversation when you’re talking with a talent evaluator—took on a somewhat fraught condition. The talk had probably moved into Guys Who Make The Most Out Of Their Limited Abilities, or perhaps into The Mental Aspect Of The Game and how that is as important as physical tools, or maybe it was more specifically about a particular player who could, would, or did manage to succeed despite a limited apparent ceiling. What I do recall, very distinctly, was the shot this evaluator fired across the bow. Actually, it was more like a smart bomb, a way to end the conversation right then and there with a strongly-worded salvo.

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Bone up on the basics of scouting with a primer on evaluating a prospect's running, fielding, and throwing ability.

While looking toward the future with our comprehensive slate of current content, we'd also like to recognize our rich past by drawing upon our extensive (and mostly free) online archive of work dating back to 1997. In an effort to highlight the best of what's gone before, we'll be bringing you a weekly blast from BP's past, introducing or re-introducing you to some of the most informative and entertaining authors who have passed through our virtual halls. If you have fond recollections of a BP piece that you'd like to nominate for re-exposure to a wider audiencesend us your suggestion.

Revisit the second part of Kevin's scouting vocabulary primer, which covered the qualities that are evaluated when a scout looks at a prospect's running, fielding, and throwing abilities. The piece was originally published as a Future Shock column on March 15, 2006.

Read the full article...

Bone up on the basics of scouting before the draft.

While looking toward the future with our comprehensive slate of current content, we'd also like to recognize our rich past by drawing upon our extensive (and mostly free) online archive of work dating back to 1997. In an effort to highlight the best of what's gone before, we'll be bringing you a weekly blast from BP's past, introducing or re-introducing you to some of the most informative and entertaining authors who have passed through our virtual halls. If you have fond recollections of a BP piece that you'd like to nominate for re-exposure to a wider audiencesend us your suggestion.

Revisit the first part of Kevin's scouting vocabulary primer, which covered the qualities that are evaluated when a scout looks at a prospect's hitting abilities. The piece was originally published as a Future Shock column on March 14, 2006.
 


Read the full article...

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

March 9, 2012 3:00 am

Future Shock: Phillies Top 11 Prospects

20

Kevin Goldstein

Good thing the Phillies are built to win right now, because there's not much immediate help on the way from the farm.

Previous Rankings: 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

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March 6, 2012 3:00 am

Future Shock: Rangers Top 11 Prospects

24

Kevin Goldstein

Despite recently graduating or trading many of their top prizes, the Texas system still has plenty of intriguing names left.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

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