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Articles Tagged Tony Gwynn 

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06-17

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5

BP Unfiltered: When Tony Gwynn Had a Below-Average Hit Tool
by
Ben Lindbergh

06-17

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1

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 472: The Greatness of Gwynn
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

06-16

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4

BP Unfiltered: Goodbye, No. 19
by
Geoff Young

02-24

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6

Prospectus Hit and Run: Big Shoes to Fill
by
Jay Jaffe

01-24

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7

Wezen-Ball: Fun With Listed Weights/Heights
by
Larry Granillo

01-23

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14

Western Front: Perpetually Rebuilding the Padres
by
Geoff Young

01-04

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11

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Class of 2012: The Catch-All
by
Jay Jaffe

03-16

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10

Fantasy Beat: Value Picks in the Outfield
by
Mike Petriello

02-08

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3

Prospectus Hit and Run: I Saw 'em When, Part 2
by
Jay Jaffe

01-03

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12

Prospectus Hit and Run: Class of 2011: Don't Stop The Rock
by
Jay Jaffe

09-10

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5

Seidnotes: Loney Loves Ribeyes
by
Eric Seidman

12-31

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8

Prospectus Hit and Run: Hall of Fame Cases for Outfielders
by
Jay Jaffe

07-02

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6

Transaction Analysis: NL West Roundup
by
Christina Kahrl

12-16

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20

Prospectus Hit and Run: A Rock-y Road
by
Jay Jaffe

12-20

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0

The Class of 2008
by
Jay Jaffe

07-16

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0

Transaction Analysis: National League Roundup
by
Christina Kahrl

01-15

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The Week in Quotes: January 9-15
by
Alex Carnevale

01-08

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The Class of 2007
by
Jay Jaffe

01-08

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The Week in Quotes: January 1-8
by
Alex Carnevale

01-05

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0

Prospectus Today: My Hall of Fame Ballot
by
Joe Sheehan

10-01

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0

Prospectus Roundtable: Ichiro!
by
Baseball Prospectus

05-27

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0

Lies, Damned Lies: Southpaw Stories, Part I
by
Nate Silver

05-14

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0

Lies, Damned Lies: Randomness: Catch the Fever!
by
Nate Silver

01-16

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Prospectus Q&A: Dr. Chris Yeager
by
Will Carroll

05-19

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Transaction Analysis: May 15-17, 2000
by
Christina Kahrl

01-11

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Cooperstown’s Newest Denizens
by
Clay Davenport

06-27

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Transaction Analysis: June 22-25
by
Christina Kahrl

10-08

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Playoff Preview - Atlanta vs. San Diego
by
Christina Kahrl

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July 2, 2009 11:35 am

Transaction Analysis: NL West Roundup

6

Christina Kahrl

The senior circuit's less mild West gets reviewed for its moves, unit-wide performances, and more.

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December 16, 2008 12:44 pm

Prospectus Hit and Run: A Rock-y Road

20

Jay Jaffe

Will Raines Wash Out on the Way to Cooperstown?

Yesterday I began the JAWS evaluation of the 2009 Hall of Fame ballot with a lengthy look at Rickey Henderson, widely acknowledged as the greatest leadoff hitter in history. Today the attention turns to Tim Raines, quite possibly the game's second-greatest leadoff hitter. Had the two players not been direct contemporaries, the latter might have fared better than the piddling 24.3 percent he polled in his first year on the ballot last time around. Unlike Henderson, Raines lacks the round-number milestones and major-category rankings that generate buzz come ballot time, but while his career numbers don't measure up to Rickey's, they more than exceed the JAWS benchmarks for Hall of Fame left fielders, whether one's looking at the older Wins Above Replacement Player system or the revisions unveiled during this series.

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December 20, 2007 12:00 am

The Class of 2008

0

Jay Jaffe

JAWS gapes for the Hall candidacy of Tim Raines, but finds the other eligible outfielders not quite so tasty.

Picking up where we left off last week, we turn JAWS loose on the outfielders of the 2008 ballot, a mercifully smaller crop than last year's 13 outfielders, but one about which we have much to discuss.

Left Fielders

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July 16, 2007 12:00 am

Transaction Analysis: National League Roundup

0

Christina Kahrl

Checking up on the moves and mayhem of all 16 clubs.

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Faithfuls are already dreaming of pitchers and catchers...fortunately, plenty of people talk in their sleep.

"My dad wasn't one to actually offer up a lot of praise and a lot of emotion. He held it all inside, but you could tell in his eyes that he was very proud. I lost my dad about eight years ago, and what I've learned is that first you think he's gone. Then you realize very quickly that he is with you every step of the way."
--Former Orioles shortstop Cal Ripken Jr., on his admission to the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, NY.

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January 8, 2007 12:00 am

The Class of 2007

0

Jay Jaffe

It's a mercifully McGwire-free Zone as Jay takes a look at the outfielders eligible for Cooperstown this year.

Outfielders

Last H HR RBI AVG OBP SLG AS MVP GG HOFS HOFM Bal 2006% Baines 2866 384 1628 .289 .356 .465 6 0 0 43.5 66.5 Belle 1726 381 1239 .295 .369 .564 5 0 0 36.1 134.5 1 7.7 Bichette 1906 274 1141 .299 .336 .499 4 0 0 30.5 82.0 Buhner 1273 310 965 .254 .359 .494 1 0 1 25.8 34.5 Canseco 1877 462 1407 .266 .353 .515 6 1 0 38.1 103.0 Davis 1430 282 934 .269 .359 .482 2 0 3 26.8 27.5 Dawson 2774 438 1591 .279 .323 .482 8 1 8 43.7 117.5 5 61.0 Gwynn 3141 135 1138 .338 .388 .459 15 0 5 53.9 277.5 Murphy 2111 398 1266 .265 .346 .469 7 2 5 34.3 115.5 8 10.8 O'Neill 2105 281 1269 .288 .363 .470 5 0 0 36.9 70.5 Parker 2712 339 1493 .290 .339 .471 7 1 3 41.1 125.5 10 14.4 Rice 2452 382 1451 .298 .352 .502 7 1 0 42.9 147.0 12 64.8 White 1934 208 846 .263 .319 .419 3 0 7 21.3 34.5 EQA BRAR BRAA FRAA WARP3 peak JAWS Belle .318 673 479 -25 89.9 74.7 82.3 Rice .295 648 379 -16 89.3 58.2 73.8 AVG HOF LF 752 477 7 111.1 62.6 86.8 Davis .301 485 303 0 72.0 53.0 62.5 Dawson .285 670 334 3 109.5 58.4 84.0 Murphy .288 569 296 -19 91.6 67.1 79.4 White .269 341 86 97 79.1 51.0 65.1 AVG HOF CF 720 466 15 109.1 63.7 86.4 Baines .294 765 439 28 102.4 49.8 76.1 Bichette .267 266 55 30 53.6 36.1 44.9 Buhner .297 438 264 -25 64.4 48.5 56.5 Canseco .306 703 460 -30 87.7 55.2 71.5 Gwynn .307 860 569 -10 124.4 68.4 96.4 O'Neill .296 597 352 62 98.5 61.7 80.1 Parker .286 627 315 -43 86.1 54.8 70.5 AVG HOF RF 795 519 36 119.6 65.4 92.5 Five of these outfielders are holdovers: Albert Belle, Andre Dawson, Dale Murphy, Dave Parker, and Jim Rice. All but Belle were nearly exact contemporaries who have been on the ballot for as long as I've been doing this. Until JAWS came along, they were relatively indistinguishable from a Hall of Fame standpoint, at least to me. Each had been one of their league's dominant players, but they all had more than a few warts, shortcomings or career gaps you could drive a truck through. The Baseball Writers Association of America has found some separation in the pack, as both Rice and Dawson have passed the 50 percent rubicon that's resulted in eventual entry into the Hall for every recipient except Gil Hodges. In the interests of space, we'll dispense with Murphy and Parker, as their cases haven't moved since last year.

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The Baseball Writers' Association of America or mental ward? You decide, plus the Yankees sign two key future Week in Quotes contributors.

"I sent in a blank ballot. I didn't vote for anybody. It's nothing personal against Tony Gwynn or Cal Ripken Jr., who have numbers that speak for themselves. ... (But) to me, the steroid era is not worthy of my vote. Anyone who played in that era makes me reluctant to jump on bandwagons."
--Chicago sportswriter Paul Ladewski, on his HOF ballot.

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January 5, 2007 12:00 am

Prospectus Today: My Hall of Fame Ballot

0

Joe Sheehan

It's theoretical, but Joe would put five players--including the one most controversial--into the Hall of Fame this year.

There's also a minor controversy about a player on the ballot for the first time.

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Today or tomorrow, Ichiro Suzuki will set the record for most hits in a single-season, breaking a mark set 84 years ago. The BP crew looks at the achievement and the player.

Joe Sheehan: Is this record a little bit cheap? I think the guy is having a good as season as he can have playing the way he does. A .414 OBP and 13 net steals with good defense is a strong year, if not an MVP one. But his performance in September seems to have been reduced to hitting groundball singles in a specific effort to chase Sisler, and it just looks cheap to me. He has three extra bases in September, for an ISO of .026, and just four unintentional walks in 126 plate appearances. A couple of weeks ago, he bunted for a hit with a runner on second base and two men out in the sixth inning on a two-run game. I have no idea how that helps the team, or what might have happened if, say, Milton Bradley had done that.

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May 27, 2004 12:00 am

Lies, Damned Lies: Southpaw Stories, Part I

0

Nate Silver

Two months ago, the Oakland Athletics signed Eric Chavez to a six-year, $66 million contract extension that will keep him with the club through 2010. Despite some head-scratching from the public, there are good reasons behind why Billy Beane campaigned to do for Chavez what he hadn't done for former MVP shortstop Miguel Tejada. Unlike Tejada, Chavez is a player whose skills, like his fine defense and his ever-improving plate discipline, are likely to be undervalued by the market. On top of which, Chavez has continued to demonstrate growth season after season, and PECOTA thinks that he's a very safe bet going forward. It is no secret, however, that Chavez has a tragic flaw: he can't hit left-handed pitching. From 2001-2003, Chavez managed a stellar line of .306/.375/.579 against right-handers, but a Mathenian .229/.278/.395 against southpaws. The A's, recognizing his defensive value and perhaps hoping that repetition would breed improvement, continued to start him anyway, in spite of a rotating array of viable platoon alternatives. This year, indeed, has brought about a turnaround--Chavez is crushing lefties so far on the season (.288/.373/.561), while performing well below his career averages against righties (.214/.358/.398). Whether there's any rationale for the change other than sample size, I'm not certain (I don't get to see the West Coast teams play as often as I'd like to). What is clear, however, is that if such a change becomes permanent--if Chavez learns how to hit left-handed pitching at the age of 26--it would be a relatively unprecedented development. In most cases, a platoon split for a left-handed hitter is something like a finger print or a dental record: it remains a readily identifiable and more or less unchanging part of his profile throughout the different stages of his playing life. A left-handed hitter with a big platoon split early in his career is, in all likelihood, going to have a big platoon split later in his career.

It is no secret, however, that Chavez has a tragic flaw: he can't hit left-handed pitching. From 2001-2003, Chavez managed a stellar line of .306/.375/.579 against right-handers, but a Mathenian .229/.278/.395 against southpaws. The A's, recognizing his defensive value and perhaps hoping that repetition would breed improvement, continued to start him anyway, in spite of a rotating array of viable platoon alternatives.

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May 14, 2003 12:00 am

Lies, Damned Lies: Randomness: Catch the Fever!

0

Nate Silver

Your favorite player hit .360 last season. If you know nothing else, what can you expect him to hit this season? This isn't meant to be a trick question; let's assume the guy had at least 500 at bats in the previous season. Gates Brown and Shane Spencer need not apply. What's your best guess? .350? .340? Not likely. The evidence is overwhelming. Let's look at all hitters since WWII who hit .350 or better in at least 500 at bats; the only other requirement is that they had at least 250 at bats in the year following.

This isn't meant to be a trick question; let's assume the guy had at least 500 at bats in the previous season. Gates Brown and Shane Spencer need not apply. What's your best guess? .350? .340? Not likely.

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Dr. Chris Yeager: I finished my Ph.D. at Southern Miss and my study was on the biomechanics of the baseball swing--specifically the effect of the stride and weight shift in the swing. Based on that and my research is where I draw my philosophy and conclusions on how force is produced in the baseball swing.

Dr. Chris Yeager is one of the brightest minds looking at the science of hitting. His scientific approach, based on the principles of physics, is detailed in a video he has made available. We spoke to him by phone from his home near the Mississippi Gulf Coast.

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