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Articles Tagged Tony Conigliaro 

Daily Collateral Damage Reports - Injuries and what effect they will have.

Articles Tagged Tony Conigliaro

Daily Collateral Damage Reports - Injuries and what effect they will have.

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May 10, 2012 3:00 am

Collateral Damage Daily: Thursday, May 10

1

Corey Dawkins

The disabled list claims Juan Rivera, Joe Wieland, and Jonathan Sanchez.

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Mariano Rivera may yet make it back for another season, but these major leaguers saw their careers KO'd by injuries.

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May 9, 2012 3:00 am

Collateral Damage Daily: Wednesday, May 9

0

Corey Dawkins

The Nationals just lost Jayson Werth, but they do get Ryan Zimmerman back.

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More baseball remembrances from the erstwhile Boston Red Sox ace.

Bill Monbouquette is as old-school as they get. The 74-year-old “Monbo” spent 50 years in the game — 11 as a big-league right-hander and many more as a pitching coach — and few have been more hard-nosed. Three years after being diagnosed with leukemia, he remains every bit as feisty.

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March 17, 2003 12:00 am

The Impossible Dream

0

Mark Armour

Growing up in New England, it was an article of faith that the 1967 Red Sox won the American League pennant with the help of divine intervention--that it was an "Impossible Dream." With the passage of time, this depiction has become less satisfying, if for no other reasons than that it gives short shrift to the people who actually built the team. Ken Coleman and Dan Valenti, in 1987's otherwise enjoyable "The Impossible Dream Remembered," wrote: "The real miracle of 1967 is that it happened, not as the conscious effort applied to a preconceived plan, but in spite of just about everything." Notwithstanding this supposed lack of either effort or a plan, Dick O'Connell, the team's architect, won the Sporting News Executive of the Year award. Suffice it to say that no one saw it coming. Perusing several 1967 preseason publications, most of them envisioned the Red Sox finishing either ninth (as they had in 1966) or 10th in the 10-team American League. Sports Illustrated came the closest to expressing optimism, saying: "If [manager Dick Williams] can find some pitching, too, the 1967 Sox may revive baseball in Boston."

Growing up in New England, it was an article of faith that the 1967 Red Sox won the American League pennant with the help of divine intervention--that it was an "Impossible Dream." With the passage of time, this depiction has become less satisfying, if for no other reasons than that it gives short shrift to the people who actually built the team. Ken Coleman and Dan Valenti, in 1987's otherwise enjoyable "The Impossible Dream Remembered," wrote: "The real miracle of 1967 is that it happened, not as the conscious effort applied to a preconceived plan, but in spite of just about everything." Notwithstanding this supposed lack of either effort or a plan, Dick O'Connell, the team's architect, won the Sporting News Executive of the Year award.

Suffice it to say that no one saw it coming. Perusing several 1967 preseason publications, most of them envisioned the Red Sox finishing either ninth (as they had in 1966) or 10th in the 10-team American League. Sports Illustrated came the closest to expressing optimism, saying: "If [manager Dick Williams] can find some pitching, too, the 1967 Sox may revive baseball in Boston."

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