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04-15

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14

Free Agent Watch: National League, Week Three
by
Josh Shepardson

01-30

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5

Wezen-Ball: The 1948 World Series, Game1: A Radio Diary
by
Larry Granillo

06-19

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2

Value Picks: First, Third, and DH for 6/18/12
by
Michael Street

05-08

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8

Value Picks: First, Third, and DH for 5/8/12
by
Michael Street

04-23

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0

Tater Trot Tracker: Trot Times for April 22
by
Larry Granillo

04-16

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0

Tater Trot Tracker: Trot Times for April 15
by
Larry Granillo

04-13

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0

Value Picks: Second, Short, and Catcher for 4/13/12
by
Michael Jong

03-07

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3

The BP Wayback Machine: Don Mincher, Part 2
by
David Laurila

02-29

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13

Prospectus Preview: AL Central 2012 Preseason Preview, Part Two
by
Steven Goldman and Ben Lindbergh

02-22

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28

Prospectus Preview: NL East 2012 Preseason Preview
by
Derek Carty and Michael Jong

02-20

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19

Prospectus Preview: AL East 2012 Preseason Preview
by
R.J. Anderson and Jason Collette

02-15

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5

Collateral Damage: The DL Kings: Alex Escobar
by
Corey Dawkins

01-25

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24

The Lineup Card: 12 Baseball Players We'd Like to See As President
by
Baseball Prospectus

01-18

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3

The BP Wayback Machine: The Arbitration Process
by
Thomas Gorman

01-16

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22

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Keltner All-Stars, Part II
by
Jay Jaffe

01-13

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61

Heartburn Hardball: Jack Morris in Motion
by
Jonathan Bernhardt

01-13

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14

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Keltner All Stars, Part I
by
Jay Jaffe

01-12

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19

Inside The Park: Remembering Minnie
by
Bradford Doolittle

01-11

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13

Sobsequy: The Love Song of T.S. Elliot Johnson (A Utilityman Ballad)
by
Adam Sobsey

01-04

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11

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Class of 2012: The Catch-All
by
Jay Jaffe

01-02

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21

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Class of 2012: The Outfielders, Part I
by
Jay Jaffe

12-28

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42

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Class of 2012: The First Basemen
by
Jay Jaffe

12-23

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6

Fantasy Beat: Platoon Problems Cost Playing Time
by
Jason Collette

12-22

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29

The Lineup Card: 10 Weirdest Baseball Injuries
by
Baseball Prospectus

12-16

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5

Baseball ProGUESTus: The Men Behind the Men Behind the Plate
by
Jonathan Bernhardt

12-09

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23

Baseball ProGUESTus: Sunset in Flushing
by
Jonathan Bernhardt and Jarrett Seidler

12-08

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2

The BP Wayback Machine: Cardinals' Special Era Reaches a Crossroads
by
Bradford Doolittle

11-18

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15

Baseball ProGUESTus: Why Having a Quick Hook Helps
by
Mitchel Lichtman

11-17

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48

The Lineup Card: 11 Ballplayers Who Suffered Unusual Demises
by
Baseball Prospectus

11-02

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12

Future Shock: Wednesday Ten-Pack
by
Kevin Goldstein

10-25

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15

Divide and Conquer, NL West: What are the Padres Getting in Josh Byrnes?
by
Geoff Young

09-30

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2

Value Picks: First, Third, and DH Review
by
Michael Street

09-28

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0

Value Picks: Second, Short, and Catcher Review
by
Michael Jong

09-27

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5

Value Picks: Outfield Review
by
Rob McQuown

09-14

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1

Value Picks: Second, Short, and Catcher for 9/14/11
by
Michael Jong

09-14

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47

The Lineup Card: Commissioner for a Day
by
Baseball Prospectus

09-07

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5

Value Picks: Second, Short, and Catcher for 8/7/11
by
Michael Jong

08-25

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12

The BP Wayback Machine: Blowing It
by
Nate Silver

08-23

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4

Value Picks: Second, Short, and Catcher for 8/22/11
by
Michael Jong

08-10

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1

Value Picks: Outfield for 8/10/11
by
Rob McQuown

07-27

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24

The Lineup Card: 17 Favorite Midseason Trades
by
Baseball Prospectus

07-25

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12

Prospectus Hit and Run: Stuck in the Middle with You
by
Jay Jaffe

07-20

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22

The Lineup Card: The Top 13 Veterans Committee Selections That Weren't THAT Bad
by
Baseball Prospectus

07-18

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2

Resident Fantasy Genius: One-Category Wonders
by
Derek Carty

07-13

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48

The Lineup Card: Cult Favorites: 18 Non-Star Ballplayers Who Should be Better Remembered
by
Baseball Prospectus

07-13

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0

The BP Wayback Machine: Trades that Made a Difference
by
Steven Goldman

07-12

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32

Prospects Will Break Your Heart: Finding a Little Future at the Futures Game
by
Jason Parks

07-12

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7

Painting the Black: Mid-season Heroes and Goats, Part 1
by
R.J. Anderson

07-09

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7

One-Hoppers: DJ3K: "I Don't Think You Can Script It Any Better"
by
Jay Jaffe

07-06

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5

Value Picks: Outfield for 7/6/11
by
Rob McQuown

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The BP team gives the players, current or former, that they'd like to see run for office

1) Branch Rickey
Branch Rickey was not a secular saint. He was a baseball man, and there was an element of self-interest in everything he did. “The farm system, which I have been given credit for developing,” Rickey said, “originated from a perfectly selfish motive: saving money.” Even breaking the color line wasn’t totally selfless. “The greatest untapped reservoir of raw material in the history of the game is the black race,” he said. “The Negroes will make us winners for years to come. And for that, I will happily bear being called a bleeding heart and a do-gooder and all that humanitarian rot.” Yet, you can also accuse Abraham Lincoln of being half-assed about emancipation. Even though their motives were not spotlessly clean, even if the results were imperfect, at least they moved in the direction of justice, which, as the Constitution says, is the whole point—to arrive at “a more perfect union.”

Ideology is not very useful; real world problems require nuanced solutions rather than predetermined responses. At the nadir of the Great Depression, presidential candidate Franklin Roosevelt said, “The country needs and, unless I mistake its temper, the country demands bold, persistent experimentation. It is common sense to take a method and try it; if it fails, admit it frankly and try another. But above all, try something.” We don’t have much of that attitude these days, just gridlock based on putting faction above statesmanship and the thin slogans that pass for political philosophy. Give me the cigar-chomping, bowtie-wearing pragmatist who, seeing an opportunity to simultaneously right a wrong and exploit an opportunity, would swear “Judas Priest!” and go about the necessary business of thinking outside of the boundaries set by his supposed peers. And if he wanted to make Leo Durocher his running mate, well, even Ike had Nixon. —Steven Goldman


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As teams and players settle in arbitration or avoid it entirely, refresh your memory on how the process works.

While looking toward the future with our comprehensive slate of current content, we'd also like to recognize our rich past by drawing upon our extensive (and mostly free) online archive of work dating back to 1997. In an effort to highlight the best of what's gone before, we'll be bringing you a weekly blast from BP's past, introducing or re-introducing you to some of the most informative and entertaining authors who have passed through our virtual halls. If you have fond recollections of a BP piece that you'd like to nominate for re-exposure to a wider audiencesend us your suggestion.

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January 16, 2012 3:00 am

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Keltner All-Stars, Part II

22

Jay Jaffe

Who makes the Hall of Fame cut when faced against the Keltner Test and JAWS?

On Friday, I unveiled the catcher and infielders on what I'm calling the Keltner All-Stars, the best eligible player at each position outside the Hall of Fame. The name comes from former Indians third baseman Ken Keltner, who inspired Bill James' Keltner Test, a set of 15 questions that can be used to frame a player’s Hall of Fame case. The basis of my choices isn't that test. Instead, I'm using JAWS.

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A writer who never saw Jack Morris pitch watches him in action for the first time and comes away even less convinced that the traditionalist case for his candidacy should earn him a call to Cooperstown.

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January 13, 2012 3:00 am

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Keltner All Stars, Part I

14

Jay Jaffe

What does the Keltner Test tell us about guys who should be in line for enshrinement?

Two years ago, following Andre Dawson’s election to the Hall of Fame, I took a trip around the diamond to identify the most worthy players at each position who remained outside of Cooperstown. The piece was a nod to Bill James, whose systematic Keltner Test—named for former Indians third baseman Ken Keltner, a set of 15 questions that can be used to frame a player’s Hall of Fame case—includes the question, "Is he the best player at his position who is eligible for the Hall of Fame but not in?" Since then, no fewer than four of the players in that lineup—Roberto Alomar, Bert Blyleven, Barry Larkin, and Ron Santo—have been elected, and the Wins Above Replacement Player system that underlies JAWS has changed significantly. Thus, it’s high time I take another spin and offer a new set of candidates.

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How one man came to support a borderline statistical candidate for the Hall of Fame whose other contributions strengthen his case.

My first memory about Minnie Minoso stems from 1977, on one of those bright afternoons when I had talked my grandfather into stopping at the dime store on the town square in Red Oak, Iowa. It's just as Sinclair Lewis as it sounds. The store sold baseball cards, and I was working on my Topps collection that summer by picking up four or five 10-cent packs at a time. Not everything at the dime store actually cost a dime, but fifteen baseball cards and one rock-hard piece of bubble gum did, and they came bundled in colorful wax wrappers that I liked so much that I refused to throw them away. My parents didn't give a rip about sports, but my grandfather had played second base in Class-B ball in southwest Iowa in the 1920s and understood what baseball could mean to a young boy. He was glad to fork over change for the cards.

Red Oak had, and still has, the type of rustic town square that was once the primary business district of small midwestern towns. Some communities have courthouses stuck in the middle of their square, but Red Oak has trees, a fountain, and a park. That day, I sat in the grass opening my cards, stuffing the gum in my mouth one piece at a time, while my grandfather lounged on a bench under a tree talking to a fellow retired farmer, who wore a green John Deere hat. The names on the cards didn't mean much to me at the time—it hadn't been that long since I had learned to read—but I loved the team names, the pictures, and of course, the numbers on the back. Suddenly I came across card No. 232 from the 1977 Topps set:

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Recounting a momentous at-bat for last season's Rays, with apologies to Prufrock.

(After Prufrock)

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January 4, 2012 12:18 am

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Class of 2012: The Catch-All

11

Jay Jaffe

Tim Raines has his case re-examined, and the remainder of the Hall ballot gets a look.

We all have our pet projects. With the graduations of Bert Blyleven and Ron Santo to the Hall of Fame, mine is now Tim Raines. During his 23-year major-league career, Raines combined the virtues of a keen batting eye, dazzling speed, and all-around athleticism with a cerebral approach that made him an electrifying performer and a dangerous offensive weapon. Yet in four years on the ballot, he's reached just 37.5 percent of the vote, exactly half of what he needs to reach Cooperstown.

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Bernie Williams burned it up with the Yankees during his career, but did the Puerto Rican do enough to blaze a trail to the Hall?

Before Derek Jeter, there was Bernie Williams. As the Yankees emerged from a barren stretch of 13 seasons without a trip to the playoffs from 1982-1994, and a particularly abysmal stretch of four straight losing seasons from 1989-1992, their young switch-hitting center fielder stood as a symbol for the franchise's resurgence. For too long, the Yankees had drafted poorly, traded away what homegrown talent they produced for veterans, and signed pricey free agents to fill the gaps as part of George Steinbrenner's eternal win-now directive. But with Steinbrenner banned by commissioner Fay Vincent and the Yankees' day-to-day baseball operations in the hands of Gene Michael, promising youngsters were allowed to develop unimpeded.

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December 28, 2011 3:30 am

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Class of 2012: The First Basemen

42

Jay Jaffe

The new JAWS runs up against players from the Steroid Era to determine their Hall worthiness.

As with comedy, timing is everything in baseball. "Hitting is timing," Hall of Famer Warren Spahn said famously, finishing the thought with the complementary observation, "Pitching is upsetting timing." A good chunk of both the game's traditional and advanced statistics, the ones that we spurn and those that we celebrate, owe plenty to being the right man in the right place at the right time—wins, saves, and RBI from the former camp, leverage, run expectancy, and win expectancy from the latter. ERA owes everything to the sequence of events. For better or worse, MVP votes are won and lost on the timing of a player's productivity, or at least the perception of it that comes with being labeled "clutch." Timing is a major part of how we measure the game, so it should matter when we look over the course of a player's career in evaluating his fitness for the Hall of Fame.

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December 23, 2011 11:36 am

Fantasy Beat: Platoon Problems Cost Playing Time

6

Jason Collette

A look at players whose struggles against certain types of pitchers could cost them playing time.

What is the number one killer of fantasy seasons? Not spouses, not kids, not careers, but playing time. It is a simple process: you see the player and the playing time and you try to draft as many plate appearances as you can because players cannot produce counting statistics if they are not in the lineup. The easiest way for a player to lose playing time is to get injured pulling a hamstring on the basepaths or landing awkwardly diving for a ball. With some players, this seems like an inevitable event, while others who are viewed as stalwarts of health still manage to get with the injury bug from time to time. It is simply out of the control of some players because even the best preventive maintenance cannot stop every injury, and we have all seen fitness freaks get hurt while the soft-bodies waddle along on the field and never get hurt.

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A look at some of the strangest injuries to ever happen to baseball players both on the field and off

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