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Ben and Sam discuss how the Jesus Montero-Michael Pineda trade has turned out so far, then talk about your ticket refund/giveaway ideas.



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Chats, Book Tour, Stadium Stops

With the 2012 baseball season finally upon us, it's time to announce BP's full slate of interactive events...designed to bring you, our fans and readers, closer to all the action.

Beginning on May 5, we launch our 2012 ballpark tour in St. Petersburg, Florida with the Tampa Bay Rays. From there, the tour continues with confirmed stops in San Diego, New York, Anaheim, Arlington, Minnesota, Kansas City, and Houston. We've partnered with Major League Baseball teams across the country and other great organizations like the Negro League Baseball Museum, The Newberg Report, The Royalman Report, and Royals Authority to bring you a fabulous experience every step of the way. Each event includes a one to two hour pregame discussion and Q & A session with members of Baseball Prospectus, special guests, and baseball operations representatives. Additional activities will be planned for All-Star Sunday in Kansas City.

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April 19, 2011 10:00 am

The Payoff Pitch: Plenty of Good Seats Still Available

26

Neil deMause

Are April's record-low attendance marks a sign that the ticket bubble has burst?

The young baseball season is already shaping up to be lots of things—the Year of the Great Red Sox Collapse, maybe, or the Year of the Exploding Appendices—but one theme that might actually survive small-sample goofiness to have some legs is the Year the Fans Went Away. MLB attendance has been gradually sliding ever since its peak in 2007, but the early signs this year have been pretty alarming:

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To read Tim Kniker's Unfiltered post following up on one of the audience's suggested topics, surf here.

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April 30, 2009 11:17 am

The Biz Beat: Yankee Ticket Pricing

20

Shawn Hoffman

A massive miscalculation, or a minor item of concern for the team's new ATM/venue?

"It's incomprehensible that you watch a game, and there will be front-row seats empty."
—Major League Soccer Commissioner Don Garber, on the new Yankee Stadium.


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Postseason tickets are increasingly hard to come by for the average fan. Maury investigates what clubs are doing to snub fans that can't afford to pay exorbitant ticket prices.

With MLB placing more emphasis on season ticket sales, fans with considerable disposable income, corporations, or sponsors are swooping up tickets that in the past might have been available to the general public at the ticket window. More and more, clubs are configuring new ticket package offerings that are tailored to get fans into long-term commitments. As an example, with a 50% deposit down on a 2007 Detroit Tigers full-season ticket package, you can get the chance to purchase 2006 League Championship and World Series home games. The increased methods of incentivizing individuals into investing in long-term commitments has increased dramatically in the past few seasons. Since those that make those investments many times have the right of first refusal for postseason tickets, clubs are only offering up a small fraction of the total seats available to the general public.

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September 28, 2004 12:00 am

D.C. At The Bat

0

Neil deMause

Neil deMause returns with the latest on the Expos-to-D.C. saga. Special guest stars include Ahmed Chalabi, Marion Barry and Terrmel Sledge.

It's been a long, strange trip for Bud Selig's traveling extortion road show, one that likely would still be going strong, ironically, if D.C. voters hadn't gotten together and kicked out three incumbent council members in favor of three declared opponents of public stadium dollars. With the threat of democracy suddenly at the door--the Backlash Three, led by Disgraced Former Mayor Marion Barry, figure to take office in January--it shook both MLB and D.C. officials loose from their mutual game of chicken, with Jerry Reinsdorf's relocation posse rushing to anoint Washington as the chosen one, while the lame-duck council produced in a matter of days a bona fide stadium plan, complete with one of those waterfront sites that gets the sports pundits drooling.

But enough backstory. Now that everybody's cards are on the table, the question to be asked is: After two years of threats, cross-continental junkets, and messing around with Terrmel Sledge's career, what did Bud finally get for his fellow owners? And on the other side of the ledger, what kind of deal are Mayor Anthony Williams and his council cronies proposing for D.C. taxpayers?

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May 17, 2004 12:00 am

Ticket Price Survey

0

Doug Pappas

The fifth installment of the series tours the majors' largest division, the NL Central. Four of the six clubs in the division have moved into new ballparks since 2000, yet the one that's virtually sold out for the season is the one that plays in a 90-year-old park built for the Federal League. The Reds, Brewers and Pirates are Exhibits A, B and C for the proposition that a new ballpark doesn't ensure on-field success. Once again, I shopped the clubs' Web sites on MLB.com to see which seats a fan could hope to buy two or three weeks in advance, and how much a typical fan, or a typical family could expect to pay. That didn't work for the Cubs, who were sold out three months in advance, but everywhere else, typical fans are likely to pay less than Team Marketing Report's Fan Cost Index suggests they would.

The fifth installment of the series tours the majors' largest division, the NL Central. Four of the six clubs in the division have moved into new ballparks since 2000, yet the one that's virtually sold out for the season is the one that plays in a 90-year-old park built for the Federal League. The Reds, Brewers and Pirates are Exhibits A, B and C for the proposition that a new ballpark doesn't ensure on-field success.

Once again, I shopped the clubs' Web sites on MLB.com to see which seats a fan could hope to buy two or three weeks in advance, and how much a typical fan, or a typical family could expect to pay. That didn't work for the Cubs, who were sold out three months in advance, but everywhere else, typical fans are likely to pay less than Team Marketing Report's Fan Cost Index suggests they would.

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May 11, 2004 12:00 am

Ticket Price Survey

0

Doug Pappas

Philadelphia Phillies Average ticket price: $26.08 (3rd in majors). 2003 attendance: 46.9% of capacity (24th in majors). Ongoing promotions: All season: "We're Finally Out Of The Vet." No discounts, but plenty of reasons to celebrate.

If you've read the first three installments of this series, you know the routine. Division by division, I'm shopping for tickets at MLB.com to see (a) how much fans can reasonably expect to pay for tickets at each ballpark, and (b) how many discounts and promotions are available for those who plan ahead.

Now up: the NL East.

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May 6, 2004 12:00 am

Ticket Price Survey

0

Doug Pappas

In the third installment of this series, I review the ticket options for fans in MLB's smallest but most geographically dispersed division, the AL West. If you've read the first two installments (Part I, Part II), you know the drill. To simulate the average fan's experience, I pick a mid-week game, then shop for tickets on MLB.com a few weeks in advance. (I made an exception for Anaheim, choosing their next available mid-week series--since their next two mid-week visitors are the Yankees and Red Sox, I thought the earlier date would still be more representative.) First I shop for my imaginary family of four, whose ideal combination of price and view is usually behind the plate and towards the front of the upper deck. Then I pretend that my imaginary family just won the lottery, shopping instead for the best available block of four seats (as determined by MLB's ticket computer) anywhere in the ballpark. The seats available for the family of four serve as a rough proxy for the club's season-ticket and advance sales. Then I play Stranger Visiting Town, looking for a single seat. My expense-account alter ego shops for the best seat available through MLB.com, while his starving-student counterpart heads right for the cheapest seats in the park. Next, I scan the club Web sites for promotions that could reduce the cost of my hypothetical fans' attendance, as well as unusual promotions and giveaway items. Finally, I write a snappy summary and prepare to start the process all over again with another division.

If you've read the first two installments (Part I, Part II), you know the drill. To simulate the average fan's experience, I pick a mid-week game, then shop for tickets on MLB.com a few weeks in advance. (I made an exception for Anaheim, choosing their next available mid-week series--since their next two mid-week visitors are the Yankees and Red Sox, I thought the earlier date would still be more representative.)

First I shop for my imaginary family of four, whose ideal combination of price and view is usually behind the plate and towards the front of the upper deck. Then I pretend that my imaginary family just won the lottery, shopping instead for the best available block of four seats (as determined by MLB's ticket computer) anywhere in the ballpark. The seats available for the family of four serve as a rough proxy for the club's season-ticket and advance sales. Then I play Stranger Visiting Town, looking for a single seat. My expense-account alter ego shops for the best seat available through MLB.com, while his starving-student counterpart heads right for the cheapest seats in the park.

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April 30, 2004 12:00 am

Ticket Price Survey

0

Doug Pappas

This is the second installment of my six-part survey of how much fans can actually expect to pay for tickets to major league games. I choose a mid-week game, then shop for tickets on MLB.com a few weeks in advance. First I look for a block of casual fan seats: ideally, four behind the plate and towards the front of the upper deck. These are usually, but not always, cheaper than the average price ticket used by Team Marketing Report to calculate the Fan Cost Index. Then I repeat the process three more times. Twice I look for the best available seats, as determined by the MLB.com ticket computer--once for a family of four and once for a single fan. The seats available for the family of four serve as a rough proxy for the club's season-ticket and advance sales, while the best single-seat option shows where a fan who doesn't care about the cost can sit without paying scalpers' prices. Finally, I look for the cheapest seats to find the lowest a fan using MLB.com could pay to get into the ballpark. To complete the survey, I check the club Web sites for promotions that could reduce the cost of my hypothetical fan's attendance, scan the club's promotional schedule for unusual events, and put it all together in the form below...

Then I repeat the process three more times. Twice I look for the "best available seats," as determined by the MLB.com ticket computer--once for a family of four and once for a single fan. The seats available for the family of four serve as a rough proxy for the club's season-ticket and advance sales, while the best single-seat option shows where a fan who doesn't care about the cost can sit without paying scalpers' prices. Finally, I look for the cheapest seats to find the lowest a fan using MLB.com could pay to get into the ballpark.

To complete the survey, I check the club Web sites for promotions that could reduce the cost of my hypothetical fan's attendance, scan the club's promotional schedule for unusual events, and put it all together in the form below:

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April 27, 2004 12:00 am

Ticket Price Survey

0

Doug Pappas

Last week I identified some of the problems with the "Fan Cost Index" developed by Team Marketing Report. One of the biggest issues, TMR's use of average ticket prices to calculate how much a typical family of four could expect to pay to see a game, has to be addressed on a team-by-team basis. This is the first of six articles that will do so. I'm starting with the AL East. My hypothetical customers decide a few weeks in advance which game they plan to attend, then shop for tickets on MLB.com. To keep the methodology constant, I'm ignoring any special knowledge I may have about a particular stadium's seats, seating and ticketing policies, and relying entirely on what I can find on MLB.com.

My hypothetical customers decide a few weeks in advance which game they plan to attend, then shop for tickets on MLB.com. To keep the methodology constant, I'm ignoring any special knowledge I may have about a particular stadium's seats, seating and ticketing policies, and relying entirely on what I can find on MLB.com.

For each game, I looked for four types of tickets. The most important, for these purposes, is a block of four "casual fan" seats--the ones that Team Marketing Report's hypothetical family would probably sit in. In checking out the options, I used my own seating preferences; in particular, I'd rather have a better angle on the action from the upper deck than a seat closer to the diamond but far down the lines. I went through the ticketing process up to the point where I was asked for my credit card, taking note of the service charges and processing fees that magically appeared along the way. (Since Team Marketing Report doesn't count these, neither did I.)

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