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September 13, 2005 12:00 am

Doctoring The Numbers: The Draft, Part Seven

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Rany Jazayerli

Rany returns with a look at the value of high-school hitters drafted between 1984 and 1999.

Using the technique described in the last part of this draft series, here's a breakdown of draft pick value for college and high school players, separated into pitchers and regulars, from 1984 through 1999:

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This is a BP Fantasy article. To read it, sign up today!

August 29, 2005 12:00 am

Fantasy Focus: Changing of the Guard

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Erik Siegrist

It may be time to throw out those old guidelines about positional production.

Looking at the bigger picture though, if Cabrera does indeed become a full-time 3B in 2006 it will be part of a larger talent flow that has made the hot corner arguably the most productive position on the infield. Alex Rodriguez's switch, David Wright's emergence, and the development of Aramis Ramirez and Morgan Ensberg have all contributed to the ascension of third base to the top of the fantasy food chain.

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January 6, 2004 12:00 am

The Class of 2004

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Jay Jaffe

With the 2004 STATLG-L Hall of Fame balloting now in the books, and the results of the BBWAA voting slated to be released this afternoon, there are few topics more prominent in baseball fans' minds than "Which players will make it to Cooperstown in 2004?" And rightfully so. Enshrinement in the Baseball Hall of Fame is the highest honor a former-player can receive, and most fans are protective of that: a fact that has spurned countless heated debates over the years--rational, objective, and otherwise. With that being said, I thought it would interesting to see what some of Baseball Prospectus' newly updated measures of player evaluation had to say on the topic. For the uninitiated, BP's Davenport Translated Player Cards measure a player's value above replacement level for offense, defense, and pitching while adjusting for context--park effects, level of offense, era, length of season, and in Clay's own words, "the distortions caused by not having to face your own team's defense." The Davenport Cards offer the most sophisticated statistical summaries available; if you can adjust for it, it's in there. The basic currencies of the Davenport system, whether it's offense, defense, or pitching, are runs and wins, more specifically, runs above replacement level and wins above replacement level.

With the 2004 STATLG-L Hall of Fame balloting now in the books, and the results of the BBWAA voting slated to be released this afternoon, few topics are more prominent in baseball fans' minds than "Which players will make it to Cooperstown in 2004?"

And rightfully so. Enshrinement in the Baseball Hall of Fame is the highest honor a former-player can receive, and most fans are protective of that: a fact that has spurned countless heated debates over the years--rational, objective, and otherwise.

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You hear a lot of talk today about how we are possibly entering the Era of the Third Basemen. Whereas at the beginning of the 1990s there were only a few truly great third basemen (Matt Williams, Robin Ventura, Jim Thome before he switched corners, Wade Boggs before he faded), today it seems that half the teams in baseball have a great player at third base.

In particular, the NL has Williams, Adrian Beltre, Jeff Cirillo, Fernando Tatis, Ken Caminiti, Scott Rolen, Chipper Jones and Ventura; an amazing collection of talent at one position. The AL is not nearly as deep, but with the emergence of Troy Glaus and the continued improvement of Eric Chavez, to go along with guys like Tony Batista, Dean Palmer and even Joe Randa, there is considerably more depth in the Junior Circuit than there was just two years ago.

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