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Articles Tagged The Hall Of Very Good 

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01-09

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0

Wezen-Ball: Through the Years: Jack Morris
by
Larry Granillo

03-20

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6

BP Unfiltered: Support The Hall of Very Good
by
Marc Normandin

03-07

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3

The BP Wayback Machine: Don Mincher, Part 2
by
David Laurila

03-06

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4

The BP Wayback Machine: Don Mincher, Part 1
by
David Laurila

02-29

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13

Prospectus Preview: AL Central 2012 Preseason Preview, Part Two
by
Steven Goldman and Ben Lindbergh

02-28

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13

Future Shock: Milwaukee Brewers Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

02-01

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1

Heartburn Hardball: All That Heaven Will Allow
by
Jonathan Bernhardt

01-24

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38

Future Shock: Washington Nationals Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

01-19

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The BP Wayback Machine: Roger Abrams
by
David Laurila

01-13

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61

Heartburn Hardball: Jack Morris in Motion
by
Jonathan Bernhardt

01-12

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19

Inside The Park: Remembering Minnie
by
Bradford Doolittle

01-04

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11

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Class of 2012: The Catch-All
by
Jay Jaffe

01-02

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21

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Class of 2012: The Outfielders, Part I
by
Jay Jaffe

12-30

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The BP Wayback Machine: Pitching to the Score
by
Greg Spira

12-30

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8

Baseball ProGUESTus: To Live and Die in Three Rivers Stadium, Or: The Face of Michael Cimino
by
David Raposa and David Roth

12-28

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42

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Class of 2012: The First Basemen
by
Jay Jaffe

12-19

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18

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Class of 2012: Middle Infielders
by
Jay Jaffe

11-22

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41

Pebble Hunting: Can I Interest You in a Juan Gonzalez Hall of Fame Brochure?
by
Sam Miller

11-22

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27

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Golden Era Ballot for the Hall of Fame
by
Jay Jaffe

10-31

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11

Baseball ProGUESTus: Silly Goose: Mariano Rivera and the Myth of the Seven-Out Save
by
Kevin Baker

10-26

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40

The Lineup Card: 13 Bad Players Who Are (or Were) Still Fun to Watch and Root For
by
Baseball Prospectus

10-22

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7

The BP Wayback Machine: Every Team Has a Special GM, Except the Cubs
by
Steven Goldman

10-19

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23

World Series Prospectus: The Midwest Showdown
by
Baseball Prospectus

09-29

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26

The Lineup Card: 14 Scariest Things to Happen While Driving
by
Baseball Prospectus

08-24

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57

The Lineup Card: 11 Disastrous Acquisitions
by
Baseball Prospectus

08-16

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29

The BP Broadside: "Compiler" Jim Thome for the Hall of Fame
by
Steven Goldman

08-04

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1

The Asian Equation: Finding Relief from NPB
by
Michael Street

07-29

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11

Prospectus Hit and Run: Beltran and Damon
by
Jay Jaffe

07-27

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24

The Lineup Card: 17 Favorite Midseason Trades
by
Baseball Prospectus

07-22

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3

On the Beat: Calling Cooperstown
by
John Perrotto

07-12

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7

Painting the Black: Mid-season Heroes and Goats, Part 1
by
R.J. Anderson

07-12

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19

The BP Broadside: Memento Mori, Clarence Budington Kelland and Joe Crede
by
Steven Goldman

05-26

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5

The BP Wayback Machine: How Do You Rate Relief?
by
Nate Silver

05-25

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17

The BP Broadside: The Annotated WARP Leaders II: Did Ernie Banks Write the Book of Love?
by
Steven Goldman

03-02

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12

Spinning Yarn: How Accurate is PitchTrax?
by
Mike Fast

03-01

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91

The BP Broadside: The Most Disappointing Prospects of All Time, Part 2
by
Steven Goldman

02-25

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38

Future Shock: Philadelphia Phillies Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

02-22

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14

Transaction Analysis: Branyan, Weeks, and Detritus
by
Christina Kahrl

02-16

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22

The BP Broadside: Every Team Has a Special GM, Except the Cubs
by
Steven Goldman

02-08

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3

Prospectus Hit and Run: I Saw 'em When, Part 2
by
Jay Jaffe

01-21

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6

Prospectus Q&A: Jack O'Connell, Part II
by
David Laurila

01-20

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13

Prospectus Q&A: Jack O'Connell, Part I
by
David Laurila

01-14

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3

Prospectus Q&A: J.T. Snow
by
David Laurila

01-13

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23

Future Shock: Detroit Tigers Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

01-13

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23

Prospectus Hit and Run: Trevor Hoffman and the Coming Wave
by
Jay Jaffe

01-12

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6

Prospectus Q&A: Don Mincher, Part II
by
David Laurila

01-11

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0

Prospectus Q&A: Don Mincher, Part I
by
David Laurila

01-10

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6

The Week in Quotes: January 3-9
by
Alex Carnevale

01-07

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12

On the Beat: The Stat Geek Heads to Cooperstown
by
John Perrotto

01-07

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1

Prospectus Q&A: Billy Martin Jr.
by
David Laurila

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Bernie Williams burned it up with the Yankees during his career, but did the Puerto Rican do enough to blaze a trail to the Hall?

Before Derek Jeter, there was Bernie Williams. As the Yankees emerged from a barren stretch of 13 seasons without a trip to the playoffs from 1982-1994, and a particularly abysmal stretch of four straight losing seasons from 1989-1992, their young switch-hitting center fielder stood as a symbol for the franchise's resurgence. For too long, the Yankees had drafted poorly, traded away what homegrown talent they produced for veterans, and signed pricey free agents to fill the gaps as part of George Steinbrenner's eternal win-now directive. But with Steinbrenner banned by commissioner Fay Vincent and the Yankees' day-to-day baseball operations in the hands of Gene Michael, promising youngsters were allowed to develop unimpeded.

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We honor the memory of the late Greg Spira by republishing one of his best pieces as Jack Morris' Hall of Fame case returns to the spotlight.

While looking toward the future with our comprehensive slate of current content, we'd also like to recognize our rich past by drawing upon our extensive (and mostly free) online archive of work dating back to 1997. In an effort to highlight the best of what's gone before, we'll be bringing you a weekly blast from BP's past, introducing or re-introducing you to some of the most informative and entertaining authors who have passed through our virtual halls. If you have fond recollections of a BP piece that you'd like to nominate for re-exposure to a wider audiencesend us your suggestion.

The late Greg Spira tackled the notion that certain hurlers "pitch to the score" in the following piece, which was originally published in Baseball Prospectus 1997.


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The two Davids conduct a humorous dialogue on all the hot stove happenings.

Believe it or not, most of our writers didn't enter the world sporting an @baseballprospectus.com address; with a few exceptions, they started out somewhere else. In an effort to up your reading pleasure while tipping our caps to some of the most illuminating work being done elsewhere on the internet, we'll be yielding the stage once a week to the best and brightest baseball writers, researchers and thinkers from outside of the BP umbrella. If you'd like to nominate a guest contributor (including yourself), please drop us a line.

David Raposa writes about music for Pitchfork and other places. He used to write about baseball for the blog formerly known as Yard Work. He occasionally blogs for himself, and he also tweets way too much.


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December 28, 2011 3:30 am

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Class of 2012: The First Basemen

42

Jay Jaffe

The new JAWS runs up against players from the Steroid Era to determine their Hall worthiness.

As with comedy, timing is everything in baseball. "Hitting is timing," Hall of Famer Warren Spahn said famously, finishing the thought with the complementary observation, "Pitching is upsetting timing." A good chunk of both the game's traditional and advanced statistics, the ones that we spurn and those that we celebrate, owe plenty to being the right man in the right place at the right time—wins, saves, and RBI from the former camp, leverage, run expectancy, and win expectancy from the latter. ERA owes everything to the sequence of events. For better or worse, MVP votes are won and lost on the timing of a player's productivity, or at least the perception of it that comes with being labeled "clutch." Timing is a major part of how we measure the game, so it should matter when we look over the course of a player's career in evaluating his fitness for the Hall of Fame.

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December 19, 2011 1:45 am

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Class of 2012: Middle Infielders

18

Jay Jaffe

Only one middle infielder passes the revamped JAWS' standards for Hall of Fame induction.

The past year has been a great one for JAWS, the Hall of Fame evaluation system whose creation marked my first contribution to Baseball Prospectus back in 2004 (I didn't name it until the next go-round). In 2011, two overly qualified candidates for whom I've advocated for the better part of a decade were finally elected. In January, Bert Blyleven received 79.7 percen tof the Baseball Writers of America vote, becoming the first player ever to gain entry on his 14th ballot. In December, the late Ron Santo received 93.8 percent of the vote from the Golden Era committee, a bittersweet result given his passing just a year ago but a vindication of what we've known here for years, that he too was worthy of a bronze plaque.

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Sam deconstructs a 12-page pamphlet that supports sending Juan Gonzalez to Cooperstown.

One of the strange things about praise is that it sometimes works in reverse. You tell me Muse is the best band in the world, and I’m compelled to dispute this craziness, and before I know it I find myself saying and thinking horribly mean things about Muse, even though Muse is perfectly fine, just not my cuppa tea.

And this is what I found myself feeling as I read Juan Gonzalez’ Hall of Fame brochure. Yes, Juan Gonzalez has a Hall of Fame brochure. It is 12 pages, it is extremely glossy, it came in the mail, and in about 25 seconds I’m going to show it to you, because you should get to see what a Hall of Fame brochure looks like. But before I do, I want to say this: Juan Gonzalez was really, really good at baseball. He was way better at baseball than Chris Sabo and Mark Portugal and Bobby Higginson, and nobody is saying mean things about them today. Whereas I am quite likely to say mean things about Juan Gonzalez and about the brochure that is supposed to be helping him. I would say this means Juan Gonzalez’ Hall of Fame brochure has failed. But let’s consider it together. (Note: click on images to expand.)

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How well do the players on the Golden Era ballot stack up to Hall of Fame standards?

The Hall of Fame's Golden Era ballot has been out since November 3, offering 10 familiar names from the 1947-1972 era for Cooperstown consideration. This isn't the Veterans Committee anymore; when last year's reforms were announced, the words "Veterans Committee" were conspicuously omitted from all press releases. Rather, it's the second of three Era Committees to get its turn at bat, following last year's Expansion Era Committee, which voted on players from the 1973-1989 period and managers, umpires, and executives from 1973 to the present. Theoretically, next year’s panel will consider candidates from the Pre-Integration period (1871-1946), but the Hall has changed the rules so often lately that all bets are off.

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Is Goose Gossage right to say that Mariano Rivera has it "easy?"

Believe it or not, most of our writers didn't enter the world sporting an @baseballprospectus.com address; with a few exceptions, they started out somewhere else. In an effort to up your reading pleasure while tipping our caps to some of the most illuminating work being done elsewhere on the internet, we'll be yielding the stage once a week to the best and brightest baseball writers, researchers and thinkers from outside of the BP umbrella. If you'd like to nominate a guest contributor (including yourself), please drop us a line.

Kevin Baker is a novelist and historian who is currently at work on a social history of New York City baseball, to be published by Pantheon.


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Despite being terrible at baseball, these players are (or were) enjoyable to watch

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With the Cubs GM situation apparently coming to a resolution, we represent a piece from February on the Cubs' historic lack of a definitive executive.

I fear that today’s installment of Broadside is going to come off as an attack on Cubs general manager Jim Hendry, but that is not my intention. Rather, it's the observation that given a wait of more than a century, for the Cubs, the point is not the journey but the destination—over 100 years at sea is quite enough of a journey, thank you. And just as every team can point to their Babe Ruth or Ted Williams and say, “This is our iconic figure,” almost every organization has an executive who came along at a key moment and guided the team through a transitional period to greater heights of success, someone whose oil portrait in the office lobby bears a plaque that says, “Pathfinder.” The best the Cubs can do is hang an empty frame, or perhaps fill it with a sign: “This space for rent.”

This piece began as a look at the Cubs’ chances for this season, but as I later read back what I had written, I found that I had over a thousand words that boiled down to, “The last 102 years weren’t very good, were they?” before I even got to the 2011 team. You don’t need me to tell you that, even though there is a perverse pleasure in observing just how long it's been since the Cubs last got to celebrate a championship. The Pirates and the Royals come in for a lot of mockery, but at least you can refer to Kansas City's 1985 championship with a straight face, and bring up Bret Saberhagen, George Brett, and Dan Quisenberry as if they were contemporary humans instead of the alien subjects of 17th-century Dutch portraiture, strange, candlelit figures with ruff collars around their necks.

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Sizing up every facet of each contender in this season's Fall Classic.

The Breakdown

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Inspired by Pascual Perez's infamous adventures on I-285 in Atlanta, the BP team recounts their scariest automobile encounters.

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