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Articles Tagged The Hall Of Very Good 

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01-09

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Wezen-Ball: Through the Years: Jack Morris
by
Larry Granillo

03-20

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6

BP Unfiltered: Support The Hall of Very Good
by
Marc Normandin

03-07

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3

The BP Wayback Machine: Don Mincher, Part 2
by
David Laurila

03-06

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4

The BP Wayback Machine: Don Mincher, Part 1
by
David Laurila

02-29

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13

Prospectus Preview: AL Central 2012 Preseason Preview, Part Two
by
Steven Goldman and Ben Lindbergh

02-28

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13

Future Shock: Milwaukee Brewers Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

02-01

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1

Heartburn Hardball: All That Heaven Will Allow
by
Jonathan Bernhardt

01-24

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38

Future Shock: Washington Nationals Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

01-19

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The BP Wayback Machine: Roger Abrams
by
David Laurila

01-13

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61

Heartburn Hardball: Jack Morris in Motion
by
Jonathan Bernhardt

01-12

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19

Inside The Park: Remembering Minnie
by
Bradford Doolittle

01-04

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11

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Class of 2012: The Catch-All
by
Jay Jaffe

01-02

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21

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Class of 2012: The Outfielders, Part I
by
Jay Jaffe

12-30

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The BP Wayback Machine: Pitching to the Score
by
Greg Spira

12-30

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8

Baseball ProGUESTus: To Live and Die in Three Rivers Stadium, Or: The Face of Michael Cimino
by
David Raposa and David Roth

12-28

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42

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Class of 2012: The First Basemen
by
Jay Jaffe

12-19

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18

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Class of 2012: Middle Infielders
by
Jay Jaffe

11-22

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41

Pebble Hunting: Can I Interest You in a Juan Gonzalez Hall of Fame Brochure?
by
Sam Miller

11-22

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27

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Golden Era Ballot for the Hall of Fame
by
Jay Jaffe

10-31

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11

Baseball ProGUESTus: Silly Goose: Mariano Rivera and the Myth of the Seven-Out Save
by
Kevin Baker

10-26

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40

The Lineup Card: 13 Bad Players Who Are (or Were) Still Fun to Watch and Root For
by
Baseball Prospectus

10-22

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7

The BP Wayback Machine: Every Team Has a Special GM, Except the Cubs
by
Steven Goldman

10-19

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23

World Series Prospectus: The Midwest Showdown
by
Baseball Prospectus

09-29

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26

The Lineup Card: 14 Scariest Things to Happen While Driving
by
Baseball Prospectus

08-24

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57

The Lineup Card: 11 Disastrous Acquisitions
by
Baseball Prospectus

08-16

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29

The BP Broadside: "Compiler" Jim Thome for the Hall of Fame
by
Steven Goldman

08-04

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1

The Asian Equation: Finding Relief from NPB
by
Michael Street

07-29

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11

Prospectus Hit and Run: Beltran and Damon
by
Jay Jaffe

07-27

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24

The Lineup Card: 17 Favorite Midseason Trades
by
Baseball Prospectus

07-22

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3

On the Beat: Calling Cooperstown
by
John Perrotto

07-12

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7

Painting the Black: Mid-season Heroes and Goats, Part 1
by
R.J. Anderson

07-12

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19

The BP Broadside: Memento Mori, Clarence Budington Kelland and Joe Crede
by
Steven Goldman

05-26

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5

The BP Wayback Machine: How Do You Rate Relief?
by
Nate Silver

05-25

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17

The BP Broadside: The Annotated WARP Leaders II: Did Ernie Banks Write the Book of Love?
by
Steven Goldman

03-02

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12

Spinning Yarn: How Accurate is PitchTrax?
by
Mike Fast

03-01

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91

The BP Broadside: The Most Disappointing Prospects of All Time, Part 2
by
Steven Goldman

02-25

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38

Future Shock: Philadelphia Phillies Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

02-22

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14

Transaction Analysis: Branyan, Weeks, and Detritus
by
Christina Kahrl

02-16

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22

The BP Broadside: Every Team Has a Special GM, Except the Cubs
by
Steven Goldman

02-08

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3

Prospectus Hit and Run: I Saw 'em When, Part 2
by
Jay Jaffe

01-21

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6

Prospectus Q&A: Jack O'Connell, Part II
by
David Laurila

01-20

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13

Prospectus Q&A: Jack O'Connell, Part I
by
David Laurila

01-14

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3

Prospectus Q&A: J.T. Snow
by
David Laurila

01-13

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23

Future Shock: Detroit Tigers Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

01-13

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23

Prospectus Hit and Run: Trevor Hoffman and the Coming Wave
by
Jay Jaffe

01-12

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6

Prospectus Q&A: Don Mincher, Part II
by
David Laurila

01-11

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Prospectus Q&A: Don Mincher, Part I
by
David Laurila

01-10

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6

The Week in Quotes: January 3-9
by
Alex Carnevale

01-07

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12

On the Beat: The Stat Geek Heads to Cooperstown
by
John Perrotto

01-07

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1

Prospectus Q&A: Billy Martin Jr.
by
David Laurila

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Looking at the controversial Hall of Fame candidate through contemporary accounts from his early career.

With the Hall of Fame announcement scheduled for this week, now is a good time to look back at the early careers of some of this year's most talked-about nominees. (And with the early exit polls looking as they do, it might be nice to remember just how great some of these players were.)

Jack Morris, longtime anchor of the Detroit Tigers pitching staff, winningest pitcher of the 1980s, and author of one of the most memorable World Series games of all-time, is now in his fourteenth year on the Hall of Fame ballot. Only three years ago, Morris was barely receiving 53% of the vote. Five years ago, it was merely 44%. Today, however, he sits on the verge of election, receiving 67% in the 2012 voting and returning to the ballot as the lead vote-getter. To be honest, the arguments over Morris's Hall worthiness have gone on so long now that it feels nearly impossible to even remember what he was like as a player. For both sides of the debate, "Jack Morris" has turned into a stone idol, representing all that is beautiful and romantic of old-school baseball on one side and all that is vile and oppressive of outdated thinking on the other. His year-to-year and day-to-day strengths and weaknesses have been mostly forgotten or ignored, except when useful in proving a point. Morris, more than any other candidate on the Hall of Fame ballot, may benefit most from a look back at contemporary accounts of his early career.

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Some of your favorite baseball writers are banding together to produce a book about players who haven't made it to Cooperstown but are enshrined in our hearts, minds, and memories.

You love baseball. You're here, reading this, so that's an easy assumption to make. Well, I love baseball, too. I'm lucky to be able to do what I do for a living, and I hope no one ever realizes how much fun I'm having while working, lest the privilege be taken away.

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Remembering the late Don Mincher with a look back at the second part of his BP interview from last year.

While looking toward the future with our comprehensive slate of current content, we'd also like to recognize our rich past by drawing upon our extensive (and mostly free) online archive of work dating back to 1997. In an effort to highlight the best of what's gone before, we'll be bringing you a weekly blast from BP's past, introducing or re-introducing you to some of the most informative and entertaining authors who have passed through our virtual halls. If you have fond recollections of a BP piece that you'd like to nominate for re-exposure to a wider audiencesend us your suggestion.

First baseman Don Mincher died on Sunday at age 73. In his memory, we're re-running David Laurila's two-part interview with him, which originally ran as a two-part "Prospectus Q&A" column on January and 11th and 12th, 2011.



Read the full article...

Remembering the late Don Mincher with a look back at the first part of his BP interview from last year.

While looking toward the future with our comprehensive slate of current content, we'd also like to recognize our rich past by drawing upon our extensive (and mostly free) online archive of work dating back to 1997. In an effort to highlight the best of what's gone before, we'll be bringing you a weekly blast from BP's past, introducing or re-introducing you to some of the most informative and entertaining authors who have passed through our virtual halls. If you have fond recollections of a BP piece that you'd like to nominate for re-exposure to a wider audiencesend us your suggestion.

First baseman Don Mincher died on Sunday at age 73. In his memory, we'll be re-running David Laurila's two-part interview with him, which originally ran as a two-part "Prospectus Q&A" column on January and 11th and 12th, 2011.
 


Read the full article...

Wrapping up our tour of the AL Central by discussing how good the Tigers can be, how close the Royals are to being competitive, and the sorry state of the Twins.

1) Will their defensive experiment work out?

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February 28, 2012 3:00 am

Future Shock: Milwaukee Brewers Top 11 Prospects

13

Kevin Goldstein

A weak Brewers system improved following the 2011 draft, but that might not be saying much

Previous Rankings: 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

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February 1, 2012 3:00 am

Heartburn Hardball: All That Heaven Will Allow

1

Jonathan Bernhardt

Pitching and defense carried the Angels last season and will aid them again in 2012, though a couple new bats might make the difference in the division.

The most famous play of Peter Bourjos’s major-league career to date comes in the bottom of the fourth inning in the Bronx on August 10, 2011, with the Yankees already out to a 5-0 lead. Bourjos is set up in center and just a few steps towards right when New York infielder Eduardo Nuñez is late on a 3-2 fastball and lines it into the right field gap. Both Bourjos and Hunter break for the ball; it’s closer to Hunter, and he dives…inches short. Less than inches short. He’s so close to catching it that it almost looks like he tips it with his glove, but the ball continues on its course untouched.

Good thing, too, because as Hunter extends in mid-air to make a highlight-reel-worthy play on the ball, Bourjos comes streaking out of nowhere behind him and gloves the ball knee-high on the run, stops, plants, and delivers the ball back towards second, where the Angels almost double up a disbelieving Russell Martin. In the three, maybe four seconds between Nuñez making contact with the outside fastball and Bourjos retiring him, the Angels center fielder crossed from medium-deep center to make a play in front of the scoreboard in right and remained on his feet while doing so, allowing him to try for the double play. The putout makes highlight reels across the country; after all, it has a spectacular dive, an out, and a near-collision in the outfield. It’s not really important which of the outfielders was responsible for what.

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January 24, 2012 3:00 am

Future Shock: Washington Nationals Top 11 Prospects

38

Kevin Goldstein

The Nats lost farmhands in the Gio Gonzalez deal but still have a solid system

Previous Rankings: 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

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Talking arbitration with long-time baseball arbitrator, professor, and author Roger Abrams.

While looking toward the future with our comprehensive slate of current content, we'd also like to recognize our rich past by drawing upon our extensive (and mostly free) online archive of work dating back to 1997. In an effort to highlight the best of what's gone before, we'll be bringing you a weekly blast from BP's past, introducing or re-introducing you to some of the most informative and entertaining authors who have passed through our virtual halls. If you have fond recollections of a BP piece that you'd like to nominate for re-exposure to a wider audiencesend us your suggestion.

Read the full article...

A writer who never saw Jack Morris pitch watches him in action for the first time and comes away even less convinced that the traditionalist case for his candidacy should earn him a call to Cooperstown.

Read the full article...

How one man came to support a borderline statistical candidate for the Hall of Fame whose other contributions strengthen his case.

My first memory about Minnie Minoso stems from 1977, on one of those bright afternoons when I had talked my grandfather into stopping at the dime store on the town square in Red Oak, Iowa. It's just as Sinclair Lewis as it sounds. The store sold baseball cards, and I was working on my Topps collection that summer by picking up four or five 10-cent packs at a time. Not everything at the dime store actually cost a dime, but fifteen baseball cards and one rock-hard piece of bubble gum did, and they came bundled in colorful wax wrappers that I liked so much that I refused to throw them away. My parents didn't give a rip about sports, but my grandfather had played second base in Class-B ball in southwest Iowa in the 1920s and understood what baseball could mean to a young boy. He was glad to fork over change for the cards.

Red Oak had, and still has, the type of rustic town square that was once the primary business district of small midwestern towns. Some communities have courthouses stuck in the middle of their square, but Red Oak has trees, a fountain, and a park. That day, I sat in the grass opening my cards, stuffing the gum in my mouth one piece at a time, while my grandfather lounged on a bench under a tree talking to a fellow retired farmer, who wore a green John Deere hat. The names on the cards didn't mean much to me at the time—it hadn't been that long since I had learned to read—but I loved the team names, the pictures, and of course, the numbers on the back. Suddenly I came across card No. 232 from the 1977 Topps set:

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January 4, 2012 12:18 am

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Class of 2012: The Catch-All

11

Jay Jaffe

Tim Raines has his case re-examined, and the remainder of the Hall ballot gets a look.

We all have our pet projects. With the graduations of Bert Blyleven and Ron Santo to the Hall of Fame, mine is now Tim Raines. During his 23-year major-league career, Raines combined the virtues of a keen batting eye, dazzling speed, and all-around athleticism with a cerebral approach that made him an electrifying performer and a dangerous offensive weapon. Yet in four years on the ballot, he's reached just 37.5 percent of the vote, exactly half of what he needs to reach Cooperstown.

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