CSS Button No Image Css3Menu.com

Baseball Prospectus home
  
  
Click here to log in Click here for forgotten password Click here to subscribe

Articles Tagged Territorial Rights 

Search BP Articles

All Blogs (including podcasts)

Active Columns

Authors

Article Types

Archives
<< Previous Tag Entries No More Tag Entries

A minor league team once tried to stop Boston games from being broadcast in a 50 mile radius of Springfield, MA.

It was announced last week that a group of fans from around the country are suing Major League Baseball and its partners over the way broadcast rights are enforced, alleging an abuse of monopoly power. From the AP report:

Read the full article...

The Athletics' inability to draw a crowd is a reflection of their poor record and awful stadium situation.

On September 4, 2002, the Oakland Athletics crammed a season-high 55,000-plus fans into the then-named Network Associates Coliseum for what is often fondly remembered as the climactic epoch of Moneyball—the night that the Athletics frittered away an early 11-run lead at home against the lowly Royals, followed by a classic incredulity-fueled Billy Beane tantrum, followed by Scott Hatteberg's heartwarming pinch-hit blast in the bottom of the ninth inning to win it. At the outset of the chapter devoted to that particular game, Michael Lewis painted a surreal picture of a "traffic jam extraordinary even by Northern California standards stretched as far as the eye could see" leading up to the sea of concrete surrounding the Coliseum on all sides.

On Wednesday night, the Coliseum played host to the playoff-bound Rangers and a comparatively exciting pitching matchup (Brandon McCarthy vs. C.J. Wilson). The announced crowd of 19,589—a figure that would rank somewhere between subpar and miserable in virtually every other major-league market, but actually constitutes the 27th-best showing in Oakland's first 80 home dates of the season. In case you were wondering what such an announced attendance total actually looks like, here was the scene from what is now named the O.co Coliseum less than five minutes before first pitch on Wednesday:

Read the full article...

Will MLB.tv ever make your home team's games available for web viewing?

Living in the future has its advantages. Back when I was a kid, in the late Pleistocene, catching a ballgame remotely meant either watching your local teams on TV or, if you were away from your living room, listening on the radio; maybe if you were very lucky and it was late at night and the ionosphere was aligned just right, you might be able to just barely tune in something that might possibly be Ernie Harwell on an out-of-town broadcast. Today, anyone with $99.99 burning a hole in their credit card ($119.99 if you want DVR-style gewgaws like fast-forward and rewind) can sign up for MLB.tv and watch any game, whether spring training, regular season, or postseason, on their computer, iPad, smartphone, or PlayStation 3—I'm sure that right this moment someone somewhere at MLB Advanced Media is working on an app that will stream hi-def baseball video live to the dashboard display of your flying car, just as soon as those are invented.

Any game, that is, unless it's one involving your local team. In that case, you're still stuck with 20th-century technology, and either tethered to your TV or forced to stick with audio. Any attempt to do otherwise will result in that dreaded message familiar to MLB.tv users: "We're sorry. Due to your current location you are blacked out of watching the game you have selected...."

Read the full article...

Efforts to move the A's to San Jose are stalled, but will Commissioner Selig set his sights on a new landing spot?

It has been almost a year since I last checked in here on the Oakland A's long-running game of footsie with San Jose, where owner Lew Wolff has been dreaming of moving the franchise seemingly ever since he bought it in 2005. At the time, a three-man task force appointed by Bud Selig to decide the team's future was entering its 12th month of deliberations. Selig promised that their report "will be coming in the near future."

A's fans will be forgiven for wondering if Selig meant a near future in geologic time. The three men—former Arthur Anderson sports consultant Bob Starkey, ex-Giants vice-president Corey Busch, and MLB lawyer Irwin Raij--have now been at their task for 22 months, in which time they've produced absolutely zilch in the way of a resolution to the question of where the A's will be playing long-term.

Read the full article...

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

June 10, 2010 7:39 pm

Squawking Baseball: The American Needle Fallout

10

Shawn Hoffman

The outcome of a lawsuit filed against the NFL could have ramifications for MLB.

It’s been a pretty long road for American Needle Inc. in its lawsuit against the NFL (and NFL Properties, and Reebok), and while it’s not over yet, things are looking up. Two weeks ago, the Supreme Court rejected the NFL’s argument that the 32 teams needed to act as a single entity when it came to licensing its trademarks to apparel makers, saying that the teams could only act in concert when it was absolutely necessary to promote football games (which obviously involve more than one franchise). The case now goes back to the lower courts, where the NFL will have to prove that giving Reebok exclusive rights to produce official merchandise wasn’t an unreasonable restraint of trade—without their “single entity” defense.

The rest of this article is restricted to Baseball Prospectus Subscribers.

Not a subscriber?

Click here for more information on Baseball Prospectus subscriptions or use the buttons to the right to subscribe and get access to the best baseball content on the web.


Cancel anytime.


That's a 33% savings over the monthly price!


That's a 33% savings over the monthly price!

Already a subscriber? Click here and use the blue login bar to log in.

While the report, whenever the task force is done typing, will no doubt include an evaluation of the three main contenders to be the future home of the A's — San Jose, A's owner Lew Wolff's preferred new home; Fremont, which has a conveniently empty auto plant site to pitch; and Oakland, which upped its ante by proposing several new potential stadium sites over the winter — what everyone is waiting for is what it says about the Giants' territorial rights to San Jose, which the team acquired as part of its own abortive efforts to move to the South Bay 20 years ago, and haven't given up ever since. (Note to any readers tempted to compare this with the Nats-Orioles territorial dustup of a few years back: That was only over cable rights, not territorial rights, which are a whole different kettle of fish under MLB bylaws.) If Selig's boys come in with a low price for what it'd take to indemnify the Giants for loss of their territory, we're likely to see a full-on push for an A's stadium in San Jose; a high price, and it's going to be a tough nut for Wolff to crack.

Read the full article...

The media overreaction to the latest sports antitrust case misses the mark on the issues.

"Antitrust case could be Armageddon."

Read the full article...

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

February 26, 2009 12:28 pm

Solving the Digital Blackout Blues

25

Shawn Hoffman

For a price, of course, but one man's proposal for how to address an increasingly archaic situation.

"This is all a very, very complicated matter. Who really has these [digital] rights, and how do we best bring them to the marketplace? That's the big question. And though we're in sort of a holding pattern right now, it's no doubt the single biggest economic issue our industry is facing."
-MLB Club Official (Sports Business Journal)

That anonymous club official was interviewed before the financial world collapsed in September, so you can forgive him for seeming to have a weird set of priorities. But if you've been reading this space, you know how valuable the digital rights to local MLB game broadcasts could be in the long term. As complicated as the issue may be, you would think that when everybody is losing-and I mean everybody-there would be some serious incentive to figure it out, but so far, no luck. If you live in Montana, you still can't see Mariners games on MLB.tv (or MLB Extra Innings, for that matter). Or, perhaps even worse, if you live in New York, you can only watch the Yankees or Mets if you're also willing to buy FitTv, about seventeen Discovery channels, and a couple hundred other cable stations that you'll never watch.


The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

March 23, 2005 12:00 am

Buying Off the Orioles

0

Neil deMause

Peter Angelos is about to receive a windfall from MLB. Does he deserve it?

Of course, those are the same press rumors that were floating around six months ago, when Jayson Stark reported of an Angelos deal that "the finish line is now so close that one source said Tuesday: 'I don't see anything now that could gunk this up.'" Like the revolution and Bruce Chen's career, it seems that Angelos/Selig detente is forever just around the corner.

When the inevitable announcement comes, you can expect the newspapers to present it as the happy denouement to a bitter but necessary squabble to resolve the conflict between the interests of the league as a whole and those of one particular owner. This is what those in the media-criticism biz refer to as "horsecrap." Regardless of what t's are crossed in the final agreement, it's plain and simple: Bud Selig got mugged, and he has no one to blame but his own fear.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

August 24, 2004 12:00 am

Whither Youppi?

0

Neil deMause

Neil DeMause checks in with the latest on the Expos saga. More extortion = more delays. And yes, this is not a reprint of old content.

That was Montreal Gazette baseball columnist Jack Todd, glumly assessing his hometown team's prospects, back in March...of 1999. Those were the days when "contraction" was only a gleam in Jerry McMorris' eye, when the Expos had local ownership--not a cabal of their 29 rivals--and when all of Quebec was still abuzz about which of those two kids, Peter Bergeron or Milton Bradley, would be Montreal's center fielder of the future.

It's going to be a close call, but Montreal's tenure could go on. MLB's just-completed owners' confab in Philadelphia may have succeeded in locking up Bud Selig as commissioner until he gets to be Julio Franco's age. But the long-awaited action on the Expos situation amounted to Bud's henchman Bob DuPuy informing suitor cities that he was still awaiting a bigger box of candy before selecting a winner. Following the earlier blow-off of a deadline at the All-Star break--and a still-earlier deadline of last year's All-Star break--baseball officials are now murmuring that a decision will be reached "by the end of the season"; BP readers and Expos fans used to these delays will be forgiven for wondering which season they mean.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

May 5, 2004 12:00 am

The Return of Swamp Thing

0

Neil deMause

Leaving aside whether anyone should take seriously statements made by the guy who said he was moving the White Sox to Tampa, on the face of it the idea is a no-brainer. In terms of market size, the New York metro area is mind-bogglingly huge, dwarfing every other market in American baseball. Even splitting the market in half (OK, more like 65/35) the Yankees and Mets each have enough TV-rights firepower to blow away the rest of the league at free-agent time. You could put a team in Jersey and three more in Brooklyn, and each of the six area franchises would still have a larger populace to draw on than the likes of Milwaukee or Cincinnati.

"It's gone from something I didn't think was possible to something that actually could happen," Zoffinger told the Newark Star-Ledger. "Jerry Reinsdorf told me that baseball is interested in the Meadowlands because we are building a family entertainment center and bringing mass transit to the site."

Leaving aside whether anyone should take seriously statements made by the guy who said he was moving the White Sox to Tampa, on the face of it the idea is a no-brainer. In terms of market size, the New York metro area is mind-bogglingly huge, dwarfing every other market in American baseball. Even splitting the market in half (OK, more like 65/35) the Yankees and Mets each have enough TV-rights firepower to blow away the rest of the league at free-agent time. You could put a team in Jersey and three more in Brooklyn, and each of the six area franchises would still have a larger populace to draw on than the likes of Milwaukee or Cincinnati.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

Dusty Baker doesn't think much of walking; he also doesn't think much of pitch counts. Reggie Jackson thinks modern-day sluggers are on 'the juice,' while Julio Franco admits to being on a juice of a different kind. Jim Hendry is old school, and proud of it. Torii Hunter is about the only non-Yankee in MLB who doesn't hate George Steinbrenner. All this and many more quips from around the league in this edition of The Week In Quotes.

"I think walks are overrated unless you can run... If you get a walk and put the pitcher in a stretch, that helps. But the guy who walks and can't run, most of the time they're clogging up the bases for somebody who can run."
--Dusty Baker, Cubs manager (Chicago Daily Herald)

Read the full article...

<< Previous Tag Entries No More Tag Entries