CSS Button No Image Css3Menu.com

Baseball Prospectus home
  
  
Click here to log in Click here for forgotten password Click here to subscribe

Premium and Super Premium Subscribers Get a 20% Discount at MLB.tv!

Articles Tagged Surprise Arizona 

Search BP Articles

All Blogs (including podcasts)

Active Columns

Authors

Article Types

No Previous Tag Entries No More Tag Entries

Between the surprises of urban planning and the surprises of backfield performances, Jason still has plenty to share as his time in Arizona winds down.

Day 30, 8:00 AM
Patricia, before arriving at the Spring Training facility each morning, Roommate Jason and I cruise the main drag in Surprise, Arizona looking for hot coffee from below-average gas stations. You might wonder why going out for coffee is a necessity when we have a coffee maker at the house, and why gas station coffee is the preference when a Starbucks is only a half of a mile farther down the road from the complex, but I’d suggest just letting it go. We all make mistakes, and some of us make a habit of making mistakes. This is a prime example of the latter. The thoroughfare in question is called Bell Road, and it’s probably the most dangerous stretch of road in the modern world. Traversing Bell Road multiple times a day shows the devolution of society, with each near automotive accident and each ten-minute trip that inevitably turns into a twenty-minute trip; however, the road itself is merely a victim of the incompetence of design, as the city expanded from a one-horse-town to a growing sprawl of chain restaurants, ubiquitous examples of chain retail consumerism, and all things cookie-cutter America. The sprawl was allowed to sprawl directly off of this main road, which is ill-equipped to support it.

Bell Road was the spine of this dusty little town, which worked fine when the town was dusty and little. But when the Rangers and Royals decided to build a beautiful baseball facility and make the town attractive for at least one month a year, the city reacted to this economic boom with the efficiency of a dial-up connection. This ghost-town that is now all grown up has yet to adjust to the resulting sprawl by allowing drivers to actually reach that sprawl from the main road. U-turns and complicated maneuvering through parking lots are almost always required to reach your consumer sprawl destination of choice, and even when you are lucky enough to locate a consumer sprawl off a stoplight, the consumer sprawl in question is almost always designed so that you can’t enter the parking lot without first negotiating the parking lots of another sprawl, in which you might have to halt your vehicle at one of the numerous stop signs contained within the larger parent sprawl, which are de facto duck crossings for the elderly, and trust me, there are a lot of really slow, elderly people that like to walk across the parking lots of the consumer sprawls, and their pace is somewhere between ice melting on a cold day and Calvin Pickering’s metabolism. 


The rest of this article is restricted to Baseball Prospectus Subscribers.

Not a subscriber?

Click here for more information on Baseball Prospectus subscriptions or use the buttons to the right to subscribe and get access to the best baseball content on the web.


Cancel anytime.


That's a 33% savings over the monthly price!


That's a 33% savings over the monthly price!

Already a subscriber? Click here and use the blue login bar to log in.

Who went where, with a blow-by-blow as the action unfolded.

1. Washington Nationals
Pick: Stephen Strasburg, RHP, San Diego State
Kevin Goldstein Says:
"Congrats Nats fan, you just got a potential franchise-changing talent. Now the REAL fun begins with the negotiation. I really should start a pool on bonus and total package. I'm guessing $8-9 million dollar bonus and total package around $25 million"
Quotable: "The first thing I'd say is 'good luck.' Then I'd say sit on the fastball, because at least you know he's going to throw strikes. So just step in there and compete and try not to strike out on three pitches."-Texas Christian infielder Ben Carruthers, on how to hit Strasburg.
Read more about Strasburg here.





Read the full article...

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

October 11, 2007 12:00 am

Future Shock: How the D'backs Were Built

0

Kevin Goldstein

Having been constructed primarily through the draft, the core of this young Diamondbacks team is one you'll be seeing play together for a long time.

Unlike the Red Sox, Arizona is very much a team built from scratch, with 14 of the players on their 25-man roster coming from the draft or through international signings. Add in some prudent trades, a couple of waiver claims, and a handful of lower-level free agent signings, and you have yourself a young playoff team that is lined up to contend for years to come.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

Moorad v. Boras, the growth of Omar Infante, and the Royals rotation--all this and much more in today's Prospectus Triple Play

Arizona acquired Cruz from Tampa Bay on February 6th for HACKING MASS MVP Casey Fossum. The trade was a good one for the Diamondbacks, especially considering the alternative in center field, Luis Terrero, is probably better suited for the role of fourth outfielder. Cruz is coming off a season in which he hit 21 homers and walked 76 times in Tampa Bay. Last year was a dip from 2003's performance, when he hit 20 home runs and walked 102 times for San Francisco, and finished second behind Barry Bonds among Giants position players in terms of wins above replacement.

Read the full article...

The Diamondbacks' Brandon Webb offers another data point in the case for home run-preventing minor league pitchers succeeding in the majors. Royals staff ace Darrell May continues the success he had in Japan. The Phillies' Rheal Cormier was the best reliever in the National League in the first half...for rheal. These and other news and notes out of Arizona, Kansas City, and Philadelphia in today's Prospectus Triple Play.

  • First-Half Star: Brandon Webb could run away with the surprise category as well as get elected mayor after what he's done, but we'll recognize his efforts here. How good has he been? Webb's .796 Support-Neutral Won/Lost percentage is the best in baseball. He's also been the most consistent pitcher in the game, racking up 14 consecutive quality starts. He's third in the NL in ERA, second in baserunners allowed per nine innings, and ninth in K/9 and K/BB. Not bad for any rookie, much less a former eighth-round pick who was completely ignored by prospect analysts before the season, largely based on a mediocre campaign for Double-A El Paso in 2002.
  • Read the full article...

    NL East | NL Central | NL West

    Welcome to Baseball Prospectus' predictions for 1999. We'll go division by division and each of our staff members will tell you what they think about the races. Remember, there's a reason we don't print this stuff in the book; there is no good way we know of to predict what a team will do before the season begins. Consider these teamwide WFGs, take them with a grain of salt, and enjoy.

    Read the full article...

    NL East | NL Central | NL West

    Welcome to Baseball Prospectus' predictions for 1998. We'll go division by division and each of our staff members will tell you what they think about the races. Remember, there's a reason we don't print this stuff in the book; there is no good way we know of to predict what a team will do before the season begins. Consider these teamwide WFGs, take them with a grain of salt, and enjoy.

    Read the full article...

    Edgardo Alfonzo
    Surprise: Forced the Mets into giving him a regular job
    Outlook: Continued improvement



    Read the full article...

    No Previous Tag Entries No More Tag Entries