CSS Button No Image Css3Menu.com

Baseball Prospectus home
  
  
Click here to log in Click here for forgotten password Click here to subscribe

Happy Thanksgiving! Regularly Scheduled Articles Will Resume Monday, December 1

Articles Tagged Strikeout 

Search BP Articles

All Blogs (including podcasts)

Active Columns

Authors

Article Types

Archives

05-24

comment icon

7

Fantasy Freestyle: The Myths of Minor-League Strikeouts
by
Bret Sayre

04-02

comment icon

8

Fantasy Freestyle: As Good as They Once Were?
by
Jason Collette

01-24

comment icon

8

The Keeper Reaper: Starting Pitching for 1/24/13
by
Paul Sporer

08-22

comment icon

5

BP Unfiltered: When Aaron Cook Struck Out Mike Trout
by
Ben Lindbergh

01-20

comment icon

3

Fantasy Beat: David Ortiz's Strikeout Improvement
by
Jason Collette

12-30

comment icon

16

Fantasy Beat: Closers in Waiting
by
Jason Collette

09-09

comment icon

4

Prospectus Hit and Run: NL Post-Season Rotation Ramble
by
Jay Jaffe

07-07

comment icon

14

The Asian Equation: The Decline of NPB Pitching Imports
by
Michael Street

06-27

comment icon

3

Fantasy Beat: Who Am I?
by
Jason Collette

04-12

comment icon

11

Fantasy Beat: Tout Wars FAAB Update
by
Jason Collette

01-17

comment icon

0

Ahead in the Count: Situational Pitching
by
Matt Swartz

09-24

comment icon

12

Ahead in the Count: Predicting Strikeouts with Whiff and Swing Rates
by
Matt Swartz

06-23

comment icon

9

Prospectus Hit and Run: Consider The K
by
Jay Jaffe

06-16

comment icon

4

Between The Numbers: Diamondhacks
by
Ben Lindbergh

05-25

comment icon

6

Changing Speeds: Bounceback Pitchers
by
Ken Funck

03-29

comment icon

3

Baseball Therapy: Credit Where It's Due, Part 1
by
Russell A. Carleton

11-25

comment icon

9

So You Need: Firemen
by
Jay Jaffe

09-29

comment icon

1

Changing Speeds: Situational Pitching, Part 3
by
Ken Funck

09-18

comment icon

3

Checking the Numbers: Whiffing the Pitcher, Part Two
by
Eric Seidman

09-17

comment icon

7

Changing Speeds: A Situational Pitching Hotfix
by
Ken Funck

08-28

comment icon

5

Checking the Numbers: Whiffing the Pitcher, Part One
by
Eric Seidman

03-16

comment icon

27

Fantasy Beat: Closers
by
Marc Normandin

12-10

comment icon

25

Prospectus Hit and Run: CC... Chooose Me!
by
Jay Jaffe

05-04

comment icon

0

Future Shock: Bearing Down on Neftali Feliz
by
Kevin Goldstein

08-28

comment icon

0

Prospectus Toolbox: Non-Contact Part V
by
Derek Jacques

08-21

comment icon

0

Prospectus Toolbox: Non-Contact Part IV: Take, Jive, and Flail
by
Derek Jacques

08-14

comment icon

0

Prospectus Toolbox: Non-Contact Part III
by
Derek Jacques

08-07

comment icon

0

Prospectus Toolbox: Non-Contact Part II: More on Strikeouts
by
Derek Jacques

07-24

comment icon

0

Prospectus Toolbox: Non-contact, Part One
by
Derek Jacques

06-04

comment icon

0

Watching the Detectives
by
Mike Carminati

04-20

comment icon

0

Lies, Damned Lies: PECOTA Takes On Right-handed Pitching Prospects
by
Nate Silver

10-16

comment icon

0

Future Shock: Monday Morning Ten-Pack
by
Kevin Goldstein

10-16

comment icon

0

Prospectus Today: LCS, Day Six
by
Joe Sheehan

10-14

comment icon

0

Future Shock: Where Did the Tigers and the Athletics Come From?
by
Kevin Goldstein

10-14

comment icon

0

Prospectus Today: LCS, Day Four
by
Joe Sheehan

10-14

comment icon

0

Playoff Prospectus: The Best and Worst of Mets and Cardinals Postseason Pitching
by
Jim Baker

10-13

comment icon

0

Prospectus Today: LCS, Day Three
by
Joe Sheehan

10-12

comment icon

0

Prospectus Today: The Games Go On
by
Joe Sheehan

10-12

comment icon

0

Player Profile
by
Marc Normandin

10-11

comment icon

0

Remembering Buck O'Neil
by
Alex Belth

10-11

comment icon

0

Prospectus Today: LCS, Day One
by
Joe Sheehan

10-09

comment icon

0

Completely Random Statistical Trivia
by
Keith Woolner

10-09

comment icon

0

Prospectus Today: Division Series, Day Six
by
Joe Sheehan

10-07

comment icon

0

Prospectus Today: Division Series, Day Four
by
Joe Sheehan

10-06

comment icon

0

Prospectus Today: Division Series, Day Three
by
Joe Sheehan

10-06

comment icon

0

Prospectus Matchups: October Musings
by
Jim Baker

10-05

comment icon

0

Prospectus Today: Division Series, Day Two
by
Joe Sheehan

02-24

comment icon

0

Lies, Damned Lies: Any Such Thing?
by
Nate Silver

10-21

comment icon

0

Pell Mel
by
Jay Jaffe

06-01

comment icon

0

Lies, Damned Lies: Strikeouts and Hitter Projections
by
Nate Silver

<< Previous Tag Entries No More Tag Entries

This is a BP Fantasy article. To read it, sign up today!

May 24, 2013 5:00 am

Fantasy Freestyle: The Myths of Minor-League Strikeouts

7

Bret Sayre

Bret explains why high minor-league strikeout rates don't always portend low batting averages when a player reaches the majors.

It gets talked about a lot; we are living through a golden age of strikeouts in baseball. And there are plenty of potential reasons for this, which are thrown out during the discussion. Some say that it’s just a talent surge on the pitching side of the equation that will correct itself during the next cycle. Some say it’s an overall lack of a two-strike mentality among hitters in the game today. Some say the sabermetric movement has reduced the fear and shame associated with striking out. Some say it’s sunscreen.

Regardless of what the true reasoning is (though it’s likely a combination of all of the above and more), we are where we are at the major-league level. But what does that mean for minor-league strikeout rates? Are contact rates in the minors decreasing at the same level that we see across the highest level of the game? The answer is that it depends how advanced the league is.

The rest of this article is restricted to Baseball Prospectus Subscribers.

Not a subscriber?

Click here for more information on Baseball Prospectus subscriptions or use the buttons to the right to subscribe and get access to the best baseball content on the web.


Cancel anytime.


That's a 33% savings over the monthly price!


That's a 33% savings over the monthly price!

Already a subscriber? Click here and use the blue login bar to log in.

This is a BP Fantasy article. To read it, sign up today!

April 2, 2013 5:00 am

Fantasy Freestyle: As Good as They Once Were?

8

Jason Collette

Jason uses historical examples to see whether pitchers with declining strikeout rates can reverse that trend.

Borrowing a bit from Toby Keith’s hit a few years back:

I ain't as good as I once was
I got a few years on me now
But there was a time, back in my prime
When I could really mow ‘em down




The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Fantasy article. To read it, sign up today!

January 24, 2013 12:57 pm

The Keeper Reaper: Starting Pitching for 1/24/13

8

Paul Sporer

Paul looks at the chances of Jordan Zimmermann and Mat Latos taking the next step in 2013.

There’s no general theme for today’s Keeper Reaper; instead, I’m going big with a pair of 500-word breakdowns on a pair of intriguing National Leaguers.

Jordan Zimmermann | Washington Nationals
Shallow (30 keepers): No
Medium (60 keepers): Fringe
Deep (90 keepers): Yes
NL-only (60 keepers): Yes
Super Deep (200 keepers): Yes






The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

The pitcher with the lowest strikeout rate in baseball faced the best hitter in the big leagues three times. One of those times, the pitcher won.

You might remember Mike Trout from such accomplishments as "being barely over 21" and "being the best player in baseball." You might remember Aaron Cook from such accomplishments as "having the lowest strikeout rate of any pitcher in decades" and "being below replacement level." The two faced off for the first time Tuesday night in Fenway. Trout, unsurprisingly, went 2-for-3 with two singles. If Trout faced Cook in every at-bat for a whole season, he might actually hit .667. But sometimes he would make outs, and once in a while, one of those outs would be a strikeout. I know this because Trout struck out against Cook in his first at-bat against him, and I have the GIFs to prove it.

Read the full article...

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

January 20, 2012 11:03 am

Fantasy Beat: David Ortiz's Strikeout Improvement

3

Jason Collette

A look at David Ortiz's batting average gains in 2011 and those who have set a similar precedent in the past.

In 2011, David Ortiz did David Ortiz things as he challenged 30 home runs, nearly drove in 100 runs, and surprised fantasy leaguers by hitting .309 last season. This came off a 2009 season in which he hit just .238 and a 2010 season in which he hit .270, so a 39 point spike in his batting average was rather surprising. One of the reasons why Ortiz was able to hit over .300 for the first time in four seasons was his dramatic reduction in strikeouts. That was certainly the easier way to do it because hitting over .300 while striking out 120 or more times is a tough feat to accomplish. Matt Kemp, Alex Gordon, and Mike Morse all did it this past season, but they are just three of 37 players to do so out of the 934 players who have struck out at least 120 times in a single season.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

December 30, 2011 11:53 am

Fantasy Beat: Closers in Waiting

16

Jason Collette

A look at relievers who have the skills needed to close and are just awaiting the opportunity

Today’s closers are mostly one of two things: yesterday’s failed starting pitcher or yesterday’s middle reliever. Rarely is a pitcher drafted and developed purely for the closing role, as many of today’s closers were once starting pitchers in the minors that either failed to stay healthy long enough to develop as a starter or never showed an ability to throw an effective off-speed pitch. The greatest closer in the history of this game, Mariano Rivera, had but one save in his entire minor league career, and it came in his first professional outing in the Gulf Coast League in 1990. Lee Smith had 478 saves in his career but had  just two in his first 58 games in the majors and only 17 in six seasons of minor league baseball before the Cubs promoted him in 1980 (and 15 of those came that same season in Wichita). Brad Lidge never saved a game in his minor league career but was shifted to a relief role in his fifth minor league season because he was only able to pitch in 23 games in his first four years and amass 99 innings of work in those games (all starts).

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

September 9, 2011 9:00 am

Prospectus Hit and Run: NL Post-Season Rotation Ramble

4

Jay Jaffe

While there is a confusing starting rotation picture for the AL playoff contenders, the NL is much clearer.

With the matter of the playoff participants in both leagues largely settled, on Wednesday I examined the unsettled nature of the playoff rotations of the likely AL representatives. As I showed, each has a considerable amount of unfinished business with regards to identifying their front four, with injuries and matchup issues both playing a part, and there's relatively little separation between the four, at least according to a quick and dirty measure I nabbed from Nate Silver's back pages. By comparison, the NL teams have much less uncertainty as to who will be taking the ball, and much more certainty about whom the fairest of them all is, at least when it comes to post-season rotations.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

July 7, 2011 9:00 am

The Asian Equation: The Decline of NPB Pitching Imports

14

Michael Street

In his fourth column in the Asian Equation series, Michael looks at the starting pitchers who have crossed the Pacific, in which many failures are punctuated with a few very notable successes.

In the flood of players coming from Japan, the majority (34 of 43) have been pitchers. Unlike the pursuit of the next Ichiro I described in my previous column, this has less to do with the success of Hideo Nomo than it does with the pitching market–pitching is a difficult commodity to find in any league. What has doomed many NPB starters in MLB, however, has been both talent and adjustment to a different pitching philosophy. To understand and explain the differences between the two, I’ve drawn not only on my own expertise, but relied on Japanese pitching expert Patrick Newman at NPB Tracker for additional insight.

Pitching differences reflect a deeper philosophical difference between Japanese and American baseball. As I discussed in my first Asian Equation column, Japanese culture appreciates baseball’s emphasis on discipline, sacrifice, and the dramatic showdown between pitcher and batter. Instead of putting a batter away quickly, NPB pitchers build tension by indiscriminately filling counts before a perfectly placed strike three resolves the battle. These aren’t seen as “wasted” pitches, instead reflecting the samurai-like virtues of endurance and dramatic battles.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Fantasy article. To read it, sign up today!

June 27, 2011 10:33 am

Fantasy Beat: Who Am I?

3

Jason Collette

Jason returns for another round of "Who Am I?"

Player 1:  In my last 105 plate appearances, I am hitting .316/.362/.531 which has taken my seasonal slash line up to a more respectable .273/.340/.432. In that time, I have 13 extra base hits, have scored 11 times, and have driven in 16 runs, but there are problems. For instance, I have struck out 32 times while walking just five during this run of success which is a stark contrast from my seasonal output. I have a nine percent walk rate and a 27 percent strikeout rate on the season, so the declines in both metrics are concerning.  My home run to fly ball ratio is just 16 percent, which is likely sustainable, but my .435 batting average on balls in play is the second-highest at my position and trails only a strong candidate for league MVP at this time. I have a 30 percent line drive rate over the past month but was at just 20 percent before this hot streak happened. Still, this is quite an impressive run for a guy that still qualifies for the rookie of the year award.  Who am I?

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

Jason gives his first report from Tout Wars, so you can get an idea of who the experts are targeting on waivers (and if it's a good idea)

We are one week into the season and emotions are all over the place. If you were one of the two people in the world who targeted Willie Bloomquist in your draft, you are loving life, as he is stealing bases at a Vince Coleman-like pace. Conversely, if you spent big bucks on Carl Crawford, you are pulling your hair out, as he is well below the Mendoza line and has just two stolen bases on the season. I mentioned in my article last week that I feel trades made in April are not always the wisest moves, but I am all for aggressive behavior on the free agent waiver wire—that typically involves the release of draft day end-game speculations.

Read the full article...

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

January 17, 2011 10:00 am

Ahead in the Count: Situational Pitching

0

Matt Swartz

Are pitchers able to apply certain skills when a game calls for it?

One of the pitchers I enjoyed watching the most while I was growing up was Tom Glavine. Even though I was a Phillies fan and frequently saw him victimize my favorite team, I was impressed by the expertise he demonstrated on the mound, and how he perfected his craft. Glavine remains the premier example of a pitcher who out-pitched his peripheral statistics; he was greater than the sum of his parts. For the amount of strikeouts, walks, and ground balls that Glavine got in his career, he should never have been able to keep runs off the scoreboard as well as he did.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

Pitch data shows that the amount of swinging strikes is not predictive of strikeout rates.

When I wrote about pitchers with major divides between their ERAs and SIERAs two weeks ago, a reader inquired why Clay Buchholz had such a pedestrian strikeout rate while having an above average swinging-strike rate. Buchholz has mustered just 6.2 K/9, nearly a full strikeout below the 7.1 league average, but has induced batters to swing and miss on 9.5 percent of his pitches according to FanGraphs, a full percentage point above the 8.5 percent league average. The question was apparent: Do pitchers who get a lot of whiffs increase their strikeout rates over time?

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

<< Previous Tag Entries No More Tag Entries