CSS Button No Image Css3Menu.com

Baseball Prospectus home
  
  
Click here to log in Click here for forgotten password Click here to subscribe

There will be a very short planned maintenance outage of the site tonight (7/22) at 11 PM ET

Articles Tagged Strikeout Rate 

Search BP Articles

All Blogs (including podcasts)

Active Columns

Authors

Article Types

Archives

06-11

comment icon

10

Overthinking It: The OTHER Way We Could Move the Mound
by
Ben Lindbergh

04-18

comment icon

2

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 431: The Rising Strikeout Rate Symposium
by
Ben Lindbergh

09-04

comment icon

2

BP Unfiltered: Gerrit Cole, New Owner of an Adequate Strikeout Rate
by
Ben Lindbergh

07-01

comment icon

1

Pebble Hunting: Felix Hernandez, Lance Lynn, and a Peripherals Paradox
by
Sam Miller

05-24

comment icon

7

Fantasy Freestyle: The Myths of Minor-League Strikeouts
by
Bret Sayre

01-24

comment icon

8

The Keeper Reaper: Starting Pitching for 1/24/13
by
Paul Sporer

09-28

comment icon

0

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 52: Oakland's All-Rookie Rotation/Baseball's Ever-Rising Strikeout Rate
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

08-22

comment icon

5

BP Unfiltered: When Aaron Cook Struck Out Mike Trout
by
Ben Lindbergh

08-03

comment icon

10

Out of Left Field: The Four Strikeouts of Aaron Cook
by
Matthew Kory

07-14

comment icon

5

BP Unfiltered: Francisco Liriano's Unconvincing Impression of a Minnesota Twin
by
Ben Lindbergh

06-05

comment icon

0

Overthinking It: Derek Lowe's Deadball Era
by
Ben Lindbergh

05-23

comment icon

10

Overthinking It: Gio Gonzalez and Max Scherzer are Striking Out Everyone
by
Ben Lindbergh

01-20

comment icon

3

Fantasy Beat: David Ortiz's Strikeout Improvement
by
Jason Collette

12-30

comment icon

16

Fantasy Beat: Closers in Waiting
by
Jason Collette

09-09

comment icon

4

Prospectus Hit and Run: NL Post-Season Rotation Ramble
by
Jay Jaffe

06-27

comment icon

3

Fantasy Beat: Who Am I?
by
Jason Collette

06-17

comment icon

1

Fantasy Beat: The Movie Title Game
by
Jason Collette

06-03

comment icon

2

Fantasy Beat: The Holy Trinity
by
Jason Collette

05-31

comment icon

5

Fantasy Beat: Who Am I?
by
Jason Collette

05-17

comment icon

5

Fantasy Beat: I Stay Away
by
Jason Collette

04-12

comment icon

11

Fantasy Beat: Tout Wars FAAB Update
by
Jason Collette

01-17

comment icon

0

Ahead in the Count: Situational Pitching
by
Matt Swartz

10-01

comment icon

4

Ahead in the Count: Pitch Data and Walks
by
Matt Swartz

09-24

comment icon

12

Ahead in the Count: Predicting Strikeouts with Whiff and Swing Rates
by
Matt Swartz

09-10

comment icon

19

Ahead in the Count: The Biggest ERA-SIERA Divides of 2010
by
Matt Swartz

07-07

comment icon

9

Checking the Numbers: Weaver's Soaring Strikeout Rate
by
Eric Seidman

06-16

comment icon

4

Between The Numbers: Diamondhacks
by
Ben Lindbergh

06-09

comment icon

1

Changing Speeds: No Contact Allowed Redux
by
Ken Funck

05-25

comment icon

6

Changing Speeds: Bounceback Pitchers
by
Ken Funck

03-29

comment icon

3

Baseball Therapy: Credit Where It's Due, Part 1
by
Russell A. Carleton

11-25

comment icon

9

So You Need: Firemen
by
Jay Jaffe

09-18

comment icon

3

Checking the Numbers: Whiffing the Pitcher, Part Two
by
Eric Seidman

08-28

comment icon

5

Checking the Numbers: Whiffing the Pitcher, Part One
by
Eric Seidman

07-13

comment icon

46

Prospectus Idol Entry: Balls and Strikes, Walks and Strikeouts
by
Brian Cartwright

03-16

comment icon

27

Fantasy Beat: Closers
by
Marc Normandin

09-11

comment icon

7

Player Profile: Cliff Lee
by
Marc Normandin, Eric Seidman and Kevin Goldstein

04-27

comment icon

0

Prospectus Preview: Sunday's Games to Watch
by
Marc Normandin

11-26

comment icon

0

Player Profile: Carlos Silva
by
Marc Normandin

08-28

comment icon

0

Prospectus Toolbox: Non-Contact Part V
by
Derek Jacques

08-21

comment icon

0

Prospectus Toolbox: Non-Contact Part IV: Take, Jive, and Flail
by
Derek Jacques

08-07

comment icon

0

Prospectus Toolbox: Non-Contact Part II: More on Strikeouts
by
Derek Jacques

07-24

comment icon

0

Prospectus Toolbox: Non-contact, Part One
by
Derek Jacques

03-14

comment icon

0

Player Profile: Tim Hudson
by
Marc Normandin

10-16

comment icon

0

Future Shock: Monday Morning Ten-Pack
by
Kevin Goldstein

10-16

comment icon

0

Prospectus Today: LCS, Day Six
by
Joe Sheehan

10-14

comment icon

0

Future Shock: Where Did the Tigers and the Athletics Come From?
by
Kevin Goldstein

10-14

comment icon

0

Prospectus Today: LCS, Day Four
by
Joe Sheehan

10-14

comment icon

0

Playoff Prospectus: The Best and Worst of Mets and Cardinals Postseason Pitching
by
Jim Baker

10-13

comment icon

0

Prospectus Today: LCS, Day Three
by
Joe Sheehan

10-12

comment icon

0

Prospectus Today: The Games Go On
by
Joe Sheehan

<< Previous Tag Entries No More Tag Entries

Why bringing an end to the strikeout scourge might require some three-dimensional thinking.

Even if you’ve missed Rob Neyer’s midnight ride to warn the world about the Strikeout Scourge—one if by land, two if by sea, three strikes you’re out—you can’t help but have noticed how many plate appearances are ending in punchouts. Baseball’s strikeout rate is up this season (from an old-record 19.9 percent last year to a new-record 20.4 percent in 2014), and batting average is at its lowest ebb in the DH era. As a result, action seems scarce, unless you prefer seeing swings-and-misses to watching balls in play.

Everyone has a pet fix for this state of affairs, or at least a way to prevent it from growing worse. Although recent research by Russell Carleton revealed that educating hitters might help turn the tide, most proposed solutions suggest hamstringing hurlers. Tighten the strike zone. Limit the number of permissible pitching changes. Politely ask Stephen Strasburg to retire for the good of the game.

Read the full article...

Ben discusses the origins and implications of baseball's skyrocketing strikeout rate with a panel of experts including Harry Pavlidis, Rob Neyer, Brian Bannister, and Alan Nathan.

Read the full article...

It didn't take long for Pirates starter Gerrit Cole to start to miss more bats.

Before we saw Gerrit Cole pitch in the big leagues, the scouting reports all told a similar story. “Has yet to dominate despite three well above-average offerings,” Jason Parks wrote when ranking him as the Pirates’ top preseason prospect. “Still needs refinement to reach extreme ceiling.”

Read the full article...

How pitchers can throw more pitches inside the strike zone and walk more batters (and vice versa).

I remember once that there was an article (not written by me, but it might as well have been; I’ve certainly written a version of this article before) that looked at a batter’s increased walk rate and concluded that it was due to... not swinging at as many pitches outside the strike zone. Colin Wyers tweeted something in response that went something like, but not exactly like, this: “uh no doy.” I try to keep that tweet (or at least something like that tweet) in mind, because it’s easy to find explanations that are already embedded in that which you seek to explain. Baseball generally obeys its own physics. Player is struggling because his heat map looks awful. Fielder’s numbers are down because fielder isn’t making plays in front/in back/whatever of him. Pitcher is walking more batters because pitcher is throwing fewer pitches in the zone.

But what about when that last one isn’t true? There are 179 pitchers who threw at least 1,000 pitches last year, and have thrown at least 500 pitches this year. The correlation between year-to-year changes in zone rate and changes in unintentional-BB rate is fairly modest: about .4. That means there must be a lot to not walking batters other than throwing pitches in the strike zone.

The rest of this article is restricted to Baseball Prospectus Subscribers.

Not a subscriber?

Click here for more information on Baseball Prospectus subscriptions or use the buttons to the right to subscribe and get access to the best baseball content on the web.


Cancel anytime.


That's a 33% savings over the monthly price!


That's a 33% savings over the monthly price!

Already a subscriber? Click here and use the blue login bar to log in.

This is a BP Fantasy article. To read it, sign up today!

May 24, 2013 5:00 am

Fantasy Freestyle: The Myths of Minor-League Strikeouts

7

Bret Sayre

Bret explains why high minor-league strikeout rates don't always portend low batting averages when a player reaches the majors.

It gets talked about a lot; we are living through a golden age of strikeouts in baseball. And there are plenty of potential reasons for this, which are thrown out during the discussion. Some say that it’s just a talent surge on the pitching side of the equation that will correct itself during the next cycle. Some say it’s an overall lack of a two-strike mentality among hitters in the game today. Some say the sabermetric movement has reduced the fear and shame associated with striking out. Some say it’s sunscreen.

Regardless of what the true reasoning is (though it’s likely a combination of all of the above and more), we are where we are at the major-league level. But what does that mean for minor-league strikeout rates? Are contact rates in the minors decreasing at the same level that we see across the highest level of the game? The answer is that it depends how advanced the league is.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Fantasy article. To read it, sign up today!

January 24, 2013 12:57 pm

The Keeper Reaper: Starting Pitching for 1/24/13

8

Paul Sporer

Paul looks at the chances of Jordan Zimmermann and Mat Latos taking the next step in 2013.

There’s no general theme for today’s Keeper Reaper; instead, I’m going big with a pair of 500-word breakdowns on a pair of intriguing National Leaguers.

Jordan Zimmermann | Washington Nationals
Shallow (30 keepers): No
Medium (60 keepers): Fringe
Deep (90 keepers): Yes
NL-only (60 keepers): Yes
Super Deep (200 keepers): Yes






The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

Ben and Sam discuss whether the A's all-rookie rotation bodes well for their future, then talk about whether the average strikeout rate has risen too high.

Ben and Sam discuss whether the A's all-rookie rotation bodes well for their future, then talk about whether the average strikeout rate has risen too high.

Episode 52: "Oakland's All-Rookie Rotation/Baseball's Ever-Rising Strikeout Rate"

Read the full article...

The pitcher with the lowest strikeout rate in baseball faced the best hitter in the big leagues three times. One of those times, the pitcher won.

You might remember Mike Trout from such accomplishments as "being barely over 21" and "being the best player in baseball." You might remember Aaron Cook from such accomplishments as "having the lowest strikeout rate of any pitcher in decades" and "being below replacement level." The two faced off for the first time Tuesday night in Fenway. Trout, unsurprisingly, went 2-for-3 with two singles. If Trout faced Cook in every at-bat for a whole season, he might actually hit .667. But sometimes he would make outs, and once in a while, one of those outs would be a strikeout. I know this because Trout struck out against Cook in his first at-bat against him, and I have the GIFs to prove it.

Read the full article...

You love reading about baseball players pushing the boundaries of baseball play, which is what Aaron Cook is doing right now.

If you go to the stats page on MLB.com and look up individual pitcher stats, you will find 101 different pitchers. If you sort by K/9 the last pitcher on the list is Derek Lowe. Lowe struck out just over three hitters per nine innings pitched. Possibly not coincidentally, Cleveland cut Lowe two days ago.

There are few absolutes in baseball, but one we know for certain is this: strikeouts are very good for pitchers. Fooling hitters, missing bats, whatever you want to call it, that’s one of the foundations of a successful pitcher. Conversely, a pitcher who doesn’t generate strikeouts is at the mercy of the baseball gods and, less nebulously, his fielders. The upshot of this is things can get ugly without strikeouts.

Read the full article...

If it doesn't look like a Twin, soft-toss like a Twin, or pitch to contact like a Twin, it's probably not a Twin.

Francisco Liriano throws hard. He misses bats. He also misses the strike zone. In other words, he's never seemed much like a Minnesota Twin. Still, we went along with his act, as long as he wore the uniform and from time to time let Ron Gardenhire tell him to pitch to contact. But on Friday night, he completely blew his cover, striking out 15 batters in a loss to the A's. Fifteen batters! That's more than Nick Blackburn strikes out in most months​. 

Read the full article...

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

June 5, 2012 10:00 am

Overthinking It: Derek Lowe's Deadball Era

0

Ben Lindbergh

Cleveland Indians starter Derek Lowe is turning back the clock on his career by pitching like Grover Cleveland is President.

Paste post text here

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

Two starting pitchers are putting up elite strikeout rates this year, without adding new pitches or heaps of velocity. This is how.

Strikeouts are up this season. That, in itself is nothing new: strikeouts have been up in many seasons—most seasons, even—since the dead ball disappeared. The explanations have multiplied almost as quickly as the Ks. The mound is higher. The strike zone is bigger. Hitters are swinging for the fences. Pitchers are increasingly specialized, and they throw pitches they didn’t use to throw, and they throw the ones that they used to throw harder than they used to throw them. Also, Jose Molina keeps tricking umpires into seeing strikes that aren’t there.

Those are all valid theories, and more than one of them, if not all of them, probably contain some truth. But to that long list of culprits behind baseball’s increasing lack of contact, I’d like to add two more: Gio Gonzalez and Max Scherzer.

Read the full article...

<< Previous Tag Entries No More Tag Entries