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Articles Tagged Strike Zone 

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05-19

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2

Working the Count: Don't Take Two Close Ones, Part Two
by
Noah Woodward

05-13

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6

Working the Count: Don't Take Two Close Ones, Part One
by
Noah Woodward

12-06

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2

Raising Aces: Diff'rent Strikes
by
Doug Thorburn

09-20

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2

BP Unfiltered: Found Footage: Kyle Lohse's Grumpy Face
by
Ben Lindbergh

07-24

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11

Baseball ProGUESTus: The Living Strike Zone
by
Jon Roegele

05-29

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1

The BP Wayback Machine: In the Slot
by
Gary Huckabay

05-13

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16

Pebble Hunting: The Strike Zone Solution
by
Sam Miller

04-24

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7

Pebble Hunting: The Most Pablo Sandoval Plate Appearances
by
Sam Miller

10-26

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16

Spinning Yarn: Can We Predict Hot and Cold Zones for Hitters?
by
Mike Fast

09-30

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21

Baseball ProGUESTus: A New Take on Plate Discipline--Redefining the Zone
by
Matt Lentzner

09-24

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71

Spinning Yarn: Removing the Mask Encore Presentation
by
Mike Fast

07-20

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14

Spinning Yarn: A Zone of Their Own
by
Mike Fast

06-01

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6

Spinning Yarn: The Real Strike Zone, Part 2
by
Mike Fast

02-16

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59

Spinning Yarn: The Real Strike Zone
by
Mike Fast

10-01

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4

Ahead in the Count: Pitch Data and Walks
by
Matt Swartz

09-24

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12

Ahead in the Count: Predicting Strikeouts with Whiff and Swing Rates
by
Matt Swartz

10-25

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0

Schrodinger's Bat: Free Stuff and the Men in Blue
by
Dan Fox

08-05

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0

Prospectus Q&A: Brian Bannister
by
David Laurila

07-27

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0

Lies, Damned Lies: Fixing It
by
Nate Silver

06-28

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0

Schrodinger's Bat: Playing Favorites
by
Dan Fox

05-24

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0

Schrodinger's Bat: Batter Versus Pitcher, Gameday Style
by
Dan Fox

03-15

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0

6-4-3: In the Slot
by
Gary Huckabay

07-27

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0

Aim For The Head: Feedback
by
Keith Woolner

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Does pitch sequencing affect the size of the called strike zone?

Link to Part One

From time to time, we’ll hear that a hitter was called out on strikes on a pitch that was “too close to take.” This statement implies that the pitch wasn’t a strike, but that it had a shot at being called one.

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Searching for evidence of the existence of the make-up call.

On June 5th, 2013, Mike Aviles came up to bat in the top of the ninth with his Indians trailing the Yankees by two runs. With Joe Girardi watching anxiously and Mariano Rivera warming in the bullpen, CC Sabathia was working hard to go the distance. Sabathia had been roughed up a bit, but he was commanding his fastball well. He had managed to keep the complete game in reach by allowing only one walk and striking out eight hitters through as many innings.

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December 6, 2013 6:00 am

Raising Aces: Diff'rent Strikes

2

Doug Thorburn

Breaking down the zone profiles of some of baseball's best pitchers.

The Minnesota Twins have earned a reputation over the years for their general preference toward “strike-throwing” pitchers who are adept at avoiding free passes, and the recent signings of Ricky Nolasco and Phil Hughes only reinforce that idea. Nolasco has maintained a walk rate between 4.8 and 5.7 percent in each of the past six seasons, and Hughes has kept his at six percent over the past two seasons combined. Both pitchers have been vulnerable to hard contact, manifested in higher-than-average rates of hits and homers allowed, and the combination of box-score stats paints the picture that they spend a lot of time within the strike zone. But does the PITCHf/x data support that notion?

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Incontroveritable evidence that the Brewers starter did get his grump on yesterday afternoon.

Yesterday afternoon, Kyle Lohse lost to the Cubs, giving up three runs on seven hits over five innings. All of the runs were scored on homers, the more damaging and game-winning of which was a two-run shot by Nate Schierholtz in the third. That homer, which was hit on 3-1, followed three straight pitches that Lohse probably felt he deserved to get. Home plate umpire Chad Fairchild felt otherwise.

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Which factors affect the size and shape of the called strike zone?

Most of our writers didn't enter the world sporting an @baseballprospectus.com address; with a few exceptions, they started out somewhere else. In an effort to up your reading pleasure while tipping our caps to some of the most illuminating work being done elsewhere on the internet, we'll be yielding the stage once a week to the best and brightest baseball writers, researchers, and thinkers from outside of the BP umbrella. If you'd like to nominate a guest contributor (including yourself), please drop us a line.

Jon Roegele is a columnist at Beyond the Box Score. He currently lives in Vancouver, British Columbia. You can follow him on Twitter at @MLBPlayerAnalys.

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An early argument for robot umpires.

While looking toward the future with our comprehensive slate of current content, we'd also like to recognize our rich past by drawing upon our extensive (and mostly free) online archive of work dating back to 1997. In an effort to highlight the best of what's gone before, we'll be bringing you a weekly blast from BP's past, introducing or re-introducing you to some of the most informative and entertaining authors who have passed through our virtual halls. If you have fond recollections of a BP piece that you'd like to nominate for re-exposure to a wider audience, send us your suggestion.

Gary penned an early, pre-PITCHf/x plea for robot umpires in the piece reprinted below, which was originally published as a "6-4-3" column on March 15, 2002.
 


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May 13, 2013 5:00 am

Pebble Hunting: The Strike Zone Solution

16

Sam Miller

Maybe it's not the umpires that need to change.

Now, whenever I go to the ballpark just to watch a game and the maniac next to me in the upper deck is screaming bloody murder at the home plate ump, I think: This is someone who has never umpired; this is someone who has never come upon the sudden understanding that the strike zone is malleable by the mind, that every pitch is a puzzle, that just about every ball has strikelike qualities and almost every strike is ballish. —Bruce Weber, As They See ’Em: A Fan’s Travels In The Land Of Umpires
 

Over the years, I’ve read a lot of proofs Rob Neyer has written that I could never find again, that were tucked into longer pieces or chapters, that elude search engines or scans of his online archives, but that I have gone back to so many times in conversation and thought that they stay with me. One of these proofs was about the flimsiness of the Human Element argument, the case against instant replay that praises umpire error as a loveable quirk of the game, like Tal’s Hill or pitchers batting. Fine, Neyer said, it’s a quirk. But who’s to say that we have exactly the right amount of human element? Why not more? Why not hire only umpires with bad vision, and refuse them glasses, if the human element is so good?

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The times when Pablo Sandoval swung, and never stopped swinging.

On Sunday, Eric Stults faced Pablo Sandoval with two outs and a runner on third base. These are the pitches he threw:

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When is hot truly hot, and when is it not?

A few weeks ago, during the division series, Brandon McCarthy remarked on Twitter that it would be more interesting for TBS to show a diagram of the batter hot and cold zones for every batter than to show the PitchTrax strike zone and pitch location graphic. He argued that knowledge of the hot and cold zones would give viewers additional insight into the battle between the pitcher and the batter.

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Is the traditional strike-ball dichotomy too simplistic?

Believe it or not, most of our writers didn't enter the world sporting an @baseballprospectus.com address; with a few exceptions, they started out somewhere else. In an effort to up your reading pleasure while tipping our caps to some of the most illuminating work being done elsewhere on the internet, we'll be yielding the stage once a week to the best and brightest baseball writers, researchers and thinkers from outside of the BP umbrella. If you'd like to nominate a guest contributor (including yourself), please drop us a line.

Matt Lentzner has carved out a (very) small niche in the baseball analysis world by examining the intersection of physics and biomechanics. He has presented at the PITCHf/x conference in each of the last two years and has written articles for The Hardball Times, as well as a previous article for Baseball Prospectus. When he’s not writing, Matt works on his physics-based baseball simulator, which is so awesome and all-encompassing that it will likely never actually be finished, though it does provide the inspiration for most of his articles and presentations. In real life, he’s an IT Director at a small financial consulting company in the Silicon Valley and also runs a physical training gym in his backyard on the weekends.

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In case you missed Mike Fast's extraordinary research into quantifying the heretofore hidden contributions of catchers, we're moving it back to the top of the list for the weekend.

I Was Framed
Catchers play a central role in the game of baseball through their involvement with every pitch that their pitchers throw. One of their key tasks is receiving borderline pitches without discouraging the umpire from calling strikes.


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As Jose Bautista can attest, the percentage of pitches a batter sees in the strike zone tells us a good deal about his capabilities.

The pitcher begins each confrontation with a batter with the initiative. He alone controls when the baseball is thrown, how it moves, and where it is located. Thus, the batter is by nature placed in a reactive position. However, the batter, too, has a measure of control over how the plate appearance proceeds. He stands at the plate with a club, and it is within his discretion to swing his weapon or not.

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