CSS Button No Image Css3Menu.com

Baseball Prospectus home
  
  
Click here to log in Click here for forgotten password Click here to subscribe

Futures Guide 2014 is Now Available in Paperback and Three E-book Formats.

Premium and Super Premium Subscribers Get a 20% Discount at MLB.tv!

Articles Tagged Spring Training 

Search BP Articles

All Blogs (including podcasts)

Active Columns

Authors

Article Types

Archives

04-02

comment icon

8

Testing the Dewan Rule
by
Ben Lindbergh and Jon Shepherd

03-29

comment icon

4

BP Unfiltered: Spring Stats Without the Small Samples
by
Ben Lindbergh

03-28

comment icon

0

Notes from the Field: Four Prospects with Work to Do
by
Chris Mellen

03-27

comment icon

39

Notes from the Field: Spring Training Scouting Reports
by
Zach Mortimer

03-26

comment icon

6

Out of Left Field: Wrongs of Spring
by
Matthew Kory

03-18

comment icon

5

Skewed Left: Spring Stats You Can (or Can't) Believe In
by
Zachary Levine

03-13

comment icon

3

Sobsequy: Notable AL Minor-League Free Agent Signees
by
Adam Sobsey

03-04

comment icon

7

Pebble Hunting: Team Previews Based on Cactus League Stadium Advertisements
by
Sam Miller

03-01

comment icon

1

BP Unfiltered: Spring Training Stats Don't Count (But Here They Are Anyway)
by
Rob McQuown

02-27

comment icon

3

Sobsequy: Notable NL Minor-League Free Agent Signees
by
Adam Sobsey

02-27

comment icon

20

Punk Hits: A Love (Hate) Letter From Arizona
by
Ian Miller

02-26

comment icon

4

The Stats Go Marching In: Who's Ahead of Whom?
by
Max Marchi

02-26

comment icon

2

BP Unfiltered: Grapefruit League Journal: Tampa Bay Rays
by
Mike Ferrin

02-21

comment icon

2

The BP Wayback Machine: Your Guide to Spring Training
by
Jim Baker

02-12

comment icon

8

Overthinking It: Spring Position Battles, National League
by
Ben Lindbergh

04-04

comment icon

0

Collateral Damage: How Much Pain Could the Doctor (Up)Chuck?
by
Corey Dawkins and Stephani Bee

04-02

comment icon

3

Collateral Damage: Spring Tune-Ups
by
Corey Dawkins and Stephani Bee

03-29

comment icon

10

Prospects Will Break Your Heart: Spring Training Diary, Day 30
by
Jason Parks

03-28

comment icon

9

Heartburn Hardball: The Mysterious Brian Matusz
by
Jonathan Bernhardt

03-28

comment icon

4

Collateral Damage: Clearing the Air
by
Corey Dawkins and Stephani Bee

03-27

comment icon

7

Out of Left Field: Spring Training With No Sleep
by
Matthew Kory

03-26

comment icon

3

The BP First Take: Monday, March 26
by
Daniel Rathman

03-26

comment icon

10

Prospectus Hit and Run: Rattling SABRs in the Desert, Part II
by
Jay Jaffe

03-26

comment icon

2

Collateral Damage: The Tommy John Brotherhood
by
Corey Dawkins and Stephani Bee

03-23

comment icon

7

Prospectus Hit and Run: Rattling SABRs in the Desert, Part I
by
Jay Jaffe

03-21

comment icon

4

Collateral Damage: Fillet o' Philly
by
Corey Dawkins and Stephani Bee

03-19

comment icon

6

Collateral Damage: Bullpen Blowout
by
Corey Dawkins and Stephani Bee

03-16

comment icon

5

Collateral Damage: Mets Misery
by
Corey Dawkins and Stephani Bee

03-15

comment icon

0

The BP First Take: Thursday, March 15
by
Daniel Rathman

03-14

comment icon

7

Collateral Damage: Spring Uprising
by
Corey Dawkins and Stephani Bee

03-12

comment icon

6

Collateral Damage: Battle of the Bulge
by
Corey Dawkins and Ben Lindbergh

03-08

comment icon

13

Prospects Will Break Your Heart: Spring Training Diary, Days 8 and 9
by
Jason Parks

03-05

comment icon

18

Out of Left Field: The Art of Enjoying Spring Training
by
Matthew Kory

03-02

comment icon

4

Collateral Damage: Socket to Him
by
Corey Dawkins and Rebecca Glass

02-24

comment icon

4

The BP Wayback Machine: Spring Training, What's it Good For?
by
Steven Goldman

02-16

comment icon

8

Overthinking It: The All-NRI Team
by
Ben Lindbergh

03-30

comment icon

15

Spinning Yarn: Do Spring Speeds Matter?
by
Mike Fast

02-04

comment icon

7

Transaction Analysis: Weekly Roundup, January 28-February 3
by
Christina Kahrl

04-09

comment icon

0

Checking the Numbers: Spring Forward
by
Eric Seidman

02-17

comment icon

0

Transaction Analysis: Camp-Opening Roundup
by
Christina Kahrl

02-10

comment icon

0

Transaction Analysis: NL West and NL Catchup
by
Christina Kahrl

02-07

comment icon

0

Transaction Analysis: AL West Catchup and Recent AL Moves
by
Christina Kahrl

02-06

comment icon

0

Transaction Analysis: NL Central Catchup
by
Christina Kahrl

01-30

comment icon

0

Transaction Analysis: AL East Catchup
by
Christina Kahrl

02-15

comment icon

0

Transaction Analysis: National League, December 15, 2005-February 11, 2006
by
Christina Kahrl

02-14

comment icon

0

Transaction Analysis: American League, December 15, 2005-February 13, 2006
by
Christina Kahrl

03-25

comment icon

0

Transaction Analysis: The Wests, etc.
by
Christina Kahrl

03-11

comment icon

0

Transaction Analysis: Offseason - The Centrals
by
Christina Kahrl

02-14

comment icon

0

Transaction Analysis: Offseason - The Easts
by
Christina Kahrl

03-06

comment icon

0

You Could Look It Up: Spring Training, What's It Good For?
by
Steven Goldman

<< Previous Tag Entries Next Tag Entries >>

The 2013 Rays must overcome the loss of their top home-run hitter and innings-pitched leader from the 2012 season.

After trading James Shields and losing B.J. Upton to free agency, the Rays find themselves in a nearly unique situation. Only 30 other teams, since the league's 1961 expansion, have lost both their home-run and innings-pitched leaders from the previous season. Of those 30, 17 saw their win total decrease the following year, but a few actually benefited from the purge. That list includes teams like the 2007 Marlins, who traded Dontrelle Willis and Miguel Cabrera from a 71-win team and then won 84 games in 2008, as well as the 2010 Diamondbacks and 2011 Athletics, who unloaded key contributors to poor rosters before righting their ships and capturing division titles.

Read the full article...

Whether it's your first trip to spring training or you're an old hand, Jim's travel tips are sure to point out things you'll need to know.

While looking toward the future with our comprehensive slate of current content, we'd also like to recognize our rich past by drawing upon our extensive (and mostly free) online archive of work dating back to 1997. In an effort to highlight the best of what's gone before, we'll be bringing you a weekly blast from BP's past, introducing or re-introducing you to some of the most informative and entertaining authors who have passed through our virtual halls. If you have fond recollections of a BP piece that you'd like to nominate for re-exposure to a wider audience, send us your suggestion.

Jim Baker offered an offbeat spring training tutorial in the piece reprinted below, which was originally published as a "Prospectus Matchups" column on March 1, 2005.
 


Read the full article...

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

February 12, 2013 11:50 am

Overthinking It: Spring Position Battles, National League

8

Ben Lindbergh

Five positions on NL contending teams where playing time is still up for grabs this spring.

General managers put most of their roster pieces in place by the time pitchers and catchers report, but the majority of major-league teams still show up at spring training with a position or two where their plans aren’t set in stone. What their depth charts will look like on Opening Day depends in part on what transpires over the next two months. Who’ll show up in better shape? Who’ll convince the manager that he wants it more? And yes, who’ll have a couple weeks of hot hitting, even if history has shown that spring training performance isn’t predictive of regular-season success?

The following five National League contenders have questions about the division of labor at one or more positions that need to be answered by the time they break camp. Here’s how those positions should shake out. (We covered the American League on Monday.)

The rest of this article is restricted to Baseball Prospectus Subscribers.

Not a subscriber?

Click here for more information on Baseball Prospectus subscriptions or use the buttons to the right to subscribe and get access to the best baseball content on the web.


Cancel anytime.


That's a 33% savings over the monthly price!


That's a 33% savings over the monthly price!

Already a subscriber? Click here and use the blue login bar to log in.

Andrew Bailey will be hitting the surgical table soon, a pitcher finds extra discomfort while vomiting, and the AL East bullpens suddenly look much thinner.

Andrew Bailey, Boston Red Sox (Right Thumb Surgery)
The Red Sox were not giving many details about Bailey’s thumb injury largely because they could not pinpoint when Bailey was injured. The pitcher’s visit with Dr. Graham confirmed he’ll need surgery on the ulnar collateral ligament in his thumb and will be out for several months at least.

Major acute ligament injuries in the thumb can almost always be attributed to a specific incident. The player may not remember the exact play, but in the following days there will be bruising, swelling, and/or pain. True acute injuries do not just hide and then pop back up 10 days later without something new to aggravate the injury. Bailey was apparently able to pitch a few more times before he felt pain while showering.


The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

April 2, 2012 3:00 am

Collateral Damage: Spring Tune-Ups

3

Corey Dawkins and Stephani Bee

Soreness and tendinitis plague several ballplayers just before the regular season begins.

Michael Pineda, New York Yankees (Right Shoulder Tendinitis)
Pineda complained about shoulder soreness only a few days ago, and a subsequent MRI revealed right shoulder tendinitis. Pineda’s has thrown with slightly less velocity this spring, but he did not complain of any soreness until after his start last Friday. He averaged roughly 94 mph last year and sat consistently in the low 90s this spring, but had been playing it off as nothing. The good news is that there is no major structural damage, so Pineda should be able to resume throwing in about two weeks.

Josh Hamilton, Texas Rangers (Left Groin Tightness)
Hamilton’s latest injury is tightness in his left groin. He underwent sports hernia surgery in November on his left side, so any soreness or tightness this far away from the surgical date is expected, but it’s also a little concerning. It’s common to have soreness when returning to full activities following surgery, and normal soreness keeps players out for a few days. Right now, this is a day-to-day issue.



The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

Between the surprises of urban planning and the surprises of backfield performances, Jason still has plenty to share as his time in Arizona winds down.

Day 30, 8:00 AM
Patricia, before arriving at the Spring Training facility each morning, Roommate Jason and I cruise the main drag in Surprise, Arizona looking for hot coffee from below-average gas stations. You might wonder why going out for coffee is a necessity when we have a coffee maker at the house, and why gas station coffee is the preference when a Starbucks is only a half of a mile farther down the road from the complex, but I’d suggest just letting it go. We all make mistakes, and some of us make a habit of making mistakes. This is a prime example of the latter. The thoroughfare in question is called Bell Road, and it’s probably the most dangerous stretch of road in the modern world. Traversing Bell Road multiple times a day shows the devolution of society, with each near automotive accident and each ten-minute trip that inevitably turns into a twenty-minute trip; however, the road itself is merely a victim of the incompetence of design, as the city expanded from a one-horse-town to a growing sprawl of chain restaurants, ubiquitous examples of chain retail consumerism, and all things cookie-cutter America. The sprawl was allowed to sprawl directly off of this main road, which is ill-equipped to support it.

Bell Road was the spine of this dusty little town, which worked fine when the town was dusty and little. But when the Rangers and Royals decided to build a beautiful baseball facility and make the town attractive for at least one month a year, the city reacted to this economic boom with the efficiency of a dial-up connection. This ghost-town that is now all grown up has yet to adjust to the resulting sprawl by allowing drivers to actually reach that sprawl from the main road. U-turns and complicated maneuvering through parking lots are almost always required to reach your consumer sprawl destination of choice, and even when you are lucky enough to locate a consumer sprawl off a stoplight, the consumer sprawl in question is almost always designed so that you can’t enter the parking lot without first negotiating the parking lots of another sprawl, in which you might have to halt your vehicle at one of the numerous stop signs contained within the larger parent sprawl, which are de facto duck crossings for the elderly, and trust me, there are a lot of really slow, elderly people that like to walk across the parking lots of the consumer sprawls, and their pace is somewhere between ice melting on a cold day and Calvin Pickering’s metabolism. 


The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

March 28, 2012 3:00 am

Heartburn Hardball: The Mysterious Brian Matusz

9

Jonathan Bernhardt

Orioles starter Brian Matusz followed his disastrous 2011 season with a successful 2012 spring training, but do we really know anything more about him than we did a month ago?

The day I begin to believe Brian Matusz's major-league career is over is a hot, slick, late August afternoon in Brooklyn. A friend and I have just finished moving a refrigerator into my apartment and are now returning the Zipcar he rented in Park Slope, and as he drives, I have my phone tuned to the audio feed of the last game the Baltimore Orioles would play that season in the state of California—a Sunday matinee pitting the Orioles' Brian Matusz against Jerome Williams of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim.

In late August, the Angels still have something to play for: they're only four games behind the Texas Rangers in the AL West and only three games behind the Tampa Bay Rays in the Wild Card hunt. They don't know it yet, but their fortunes won’t improve; they'll play slightly better than .500 ball through the first few weeks of September, but slightly better than .500 ball doesn't catch the hottest team in the league—Texas would go 19-6 in September 2011—or the Rays, who have taken to hunting the Boston Red Sox like 25 light-hitting Ahabs. This Sunday afternoon, though, the Angels' season still has a glimmer of hope, even if it is just a trick of the light.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

March 28, 2012 3:00 am

Collateral Damage: Clearing the Air

4

Corey Dawkins and Stephani Bee

Joba clears up the confusion about his injury, while Logan Morrison continues to be plagued by knee troubles.

It’s mostly Flesh Wounds today, but there are a few important things to discuss.

Sam Fuld, Tampa Bay Rays (Right Wrist Inflammation)
Fuld’s wrists have not had a good spring. First, Fuld missed about a week near the start of spring training games with right wrist inflammation, but his current wrist soreness appears to be much worse. One of the tendon sheaths in his right wrist is irritated because it’s popping in and out of place. When there is tendon instability, it loses the mechanical efficiency and strength. It’s quite painful when it subluxes.


The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

March 27, 2012 3:00 am

Out of Left Field: Spring Training With No Sleep

7

Matthew Kory

There's no time to rest during a weekend in Clearwater.

This bar was a dive bar before dive bars became cool. In fact, this bar skipped the whole "being cool" thing entirely, jumping from "pre-cool dive" straight to "dump." Pat orders a plate of nachos and when it arrives I notice more than a passing resemblance to dog food. A man, the bar’s owner, hands Pat the nachos and says, and I swear I’m not making this up, “Sorry if that looks too much like dog food.” It was that kind of bar. That kind of night.

***

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

Losing Joakim Soria isn't a death blow to the Royals' ninth-inning hopes.

When is losing your closer—not long ago considered one of the best closers in the league—not a big deal? What if you have a possible replacement on your roster whose rookie season was historically good?

Bob Dutton, the Royals beat writer for The Kansas City Star, reported on Friday that Joakim Soria had decided to undergo Tommy John surgery and would miss the entire 2012 season. Soria previously needed a UCL replacement procedure in 2003 while in the low minors with the Dodgers, three years before the Royals plucked him out of the Padres’ farm system in the Rule 5 draft. 

Read the full article...

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

March 26, 2012 3:00 am

Prospectus Hit and Run: Rattling SABRs in the Desert, Part II

10

Jay Jaffe

Detailing some of the major panels at the first SABR Analytics Conference and soaking in some spring training action.

Continued from Part I

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

Tommy John surgery claims several more pitchers, and Joba Chamberlain suffers an extremely gruesome ankle dislocation.

Ryan Madson, Cincinnati Reds (Tommy John Surgery)
On Friday, one of the most surprising bits of news with the greatest impact was that Madson needs Tommy John surgery. Madson had battled elbow trouble throughout the spring, but it looked like he was turning a corner as recently as last week. Unfortunately, in the few days prior to his scheduled debut, he suffered a setback and was sent to Dr. Tim Kremchek for further evaluation. Dr. Kremchek found that the ulnar collateral ligament was torn (some of it off the bone), and that the tear appeared to be recent because of the amount of bleeding present.

Madson signed a one-year deal with the Reds over the winter after his four-year deal with Philadelphia fell through. Madson’s injury throws everything in flux for the Reds’ pitching corps, but for now, Sean Marshall is the heir apparent as closer. General manager Walt Jocketty has not ruled moving Aroldis Chapman back into a bullpen role this year but insists nothing is set in stone. The only sure thing is that Madson will miss 2012 and will have a hard time convincing teams to sign him next winter as he completes his rehabilitation.


Read the full article...

<< Previous Tag Entries Next Tag Entries >>