CSS Button No Image Css3Menu.com

Baseball Prospectus home
  
  
Click here to log in Click here for forgotten password Click here to subscribe

Articles Tagged Speed 

Search BP Articles

All Blogs (including podcasts)

Active Columns

Authors

Article Types

Archives

07-10

comment icon

10

Prospectus Feature: Measuring Pitcher Similarity
by
Glenn Healey, Shiyuan Zhao and Dan Brooks

07-10

comment icon

4

The Buyer's Guide: Orlando Arcia
by
Eric Roseberry

07-03

comment icon

2

The Buyer's Guide: Michael A. Taylor
by
Eric Roseberry

06-20

comment icon

0

The Buyer's Guide: Mallex Smith
by
Eric Roseberry

06-19

comment icon

10

Fantasy Freestyle: The Evolution and Decline of Francisco Lindor
by
George Bissell

05-17

comment icon

0

The Call-Up: Bradley Zimmer
by
Erich Rothmann and George Bissell

04-19

comment icon

0

Cold Takes: How to Attack Baseball's Weakest Hitters
by
Patrick Dubuque

03-10

comment icon

4

Flu-Like Symptoms: Power and Speed
by
Rob Mains

07-08

comment icon

7

Baseball Therapy: What is a Fast Runner Worth?
by
Russell A. Carleton

04-16

comment icon

25

Overthinking It: Does Baseball Have a Pace Problem?
by
Ben Lindbergh

03-07

comment icon

23

Pebble Hunting: Billy Hamilton, Usain Bolt, and Whether 90 Feet is Still Enough
by
Sam Miller

02-20

comment icon

63

Top Tools: Best Speed/Makeup
by
Mark Anderson and BP Prospect Staff

04-08

comment icon

10

Minor League Update: Games of April 5-April 7
by
Zach Mortimer

03-08

comment icon

22

Raising Aces: Under the Gun
by
Doug Thorburn

02-06

comment icon

13

Pebble Hunting: How Bad Can Clogging the Bases Be?
by
Sam Miller

08-07

comment icon

19

BP Unfiltered: Billy Hamilton is Not Impressed by Usain Bolt
by
Hudson Belinsky

05-11

comment icon

1

The Stats Go Marching In: All About Velocity
by
Max Marchi

11-22

comment icon

30

Spinning Yarn: How Does Quality of Contact Relate to BABIP?
by
Mike Fast

11-16

comment icon

41

Spinning Yarn: Who Controls How Hard the Ball is Hit?
by
Mike Fast

08-26

comment icon

4

Baseball ProGUESTus: Do Pitchers Really Trade Speed for Command?
by
Graham Goldbeck

08-11

comment icon

45

Prospects Will Break Your Heart: Positional Primacy: Center Field
by
Jason Parks

07-19

comment icon

29

Prospects Will Break Your Heart: Caught Up in the Complex League
by
Jason Parks

06-02

comment icon

28

Prospects Will Break Your Heart: U Got the Look: Speed, Makeup, and the Power of Words
by
Jason Parks

05-11

comment icon

15

Spinning Yarn: Speed Traps
by
Mike Fast

04-27

comment icon

9

Spinning Yarn: A Soria Subject
by
Mike Fast

03-30

comment icon

15

Spinning Yarn: Do Spring Speeds Matter?
by
Mike Fast

02-16

comment icon

38

Future Shock: Minnesota Twins Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

02-07

comment icon

21

Future Shock: Cincinnati Reds Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

01-04

comment icon

43

Future Shock: Los Angeles Dodgers Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

12-22

comment icon

57

Future Shock: New York Mets Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

12-21

comment icon

33

Future Shock: Milwaukee Brewers Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

12-14

comment icon

26

Future Shock: Houston Astros Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

10-26

comment icon

8

Spinning Yarn: Interpreting Pitch Classifications
by
Mike Fast

11-22

comment icon

23

Prospectus Today: Infield Free Agents Review
by
Joe Sheehan

09-22

comment icon

35

Checking the Numbers: Perceived Velocity
by
Eric Seidman

06-06

comment icon

31

Future Shock: Draft Class '09 Top 50
by
Kevin Goldstein

03-25

comment icon

15

Speed and Power
by
Christina Kahrl

10-26

comment icon

23

Prospectus Today: Speedy Endings?
by
Joe Sheehan

03-03

comment icon

0

Prospectus Today: Lineupology
by
Joe Sheehan

10-28

comment icon

0

Prospectus Q&A: Curt Young
by
David Laurila

08-29

comment icon

0

Future Shock: Positional Rankings--Center Field
by
Kevin Goldstein

08-15

comment icon

0

Future Shock: Teaching Tools
by
Kevin Goldstein

04-10

comment icon

0

Who Will Rid Me of This Pestilent McCovey?
by
Brandon Isleib

10-14

comment icon

0

Future Shock: Where Did the Tigers and the Athletics Come From?
by
Kevin Goldstein

01-04

comment icon

0

Blocking the Uppercut
by
Seth Samuels

06-17

comment icon

0

Another Look at OBP
by
James Click

08-27

comment icon

0

Lies, Damned Lies: The Value of Speed
by
Nate Silver

08-25

comment icon

0

The Week in Quotes: August 18-24
by
Ryan Wilkins

<< Previous Tag Entries No More Tag Entries

Creating a tool that considers the speed and movement of every pitch, the similarity measure allows the direct comparison of pitchers across various contexts.

The PITCHf/x optical video and TrackMan Doppler radar sensors estimate parameters of pitches, including the speed, horizontal movement and vertical movement. The data recorded by these systems can be used to develop pitcher similarity measures. These measures are valuable not only for comparing major-league pitchers to each other, but also for allowing the direct comparison of pitchers in other leagues (minor, amateur and foreign) to their MLB counterparts.

A pitcher similarity measure can be employed for multiple purposes by analysts. The identification of groups of similar pitchers can be used to generate optimized projection models [18], or to generate larger samples for predicting the outcome of batter/pitcher matchups [3], [20]. In addition, a similarity measure allows for individual pitchers to be monitored over time in order to detect possible changes in pitch characteristics, health and throwing mechanics.

Previous methods for quantifying pitcher similarity have been limited to the comparison of pitches of the same type, which makes these methods highly dependent on the outcome of pitch-classification algorithms. Kalk [8], [9] developed a similarity measure that compared pitches of the same type using variables that included pitch frequency, speed and movement. Loftus [11], [12], [13] improved on Kalk's approach by separating pitchers by handedness while using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov distance to compare distributions. Like Kalk's method, however, this approach only considers comparisons between pitches of the same type.

A difficulty for these methods is that different pitch types for a single pitcher or across multiple pitchers can have similar properties. This causes the pitch-frequency statistics used by similarity algorithms to depend heavily on the classification process; it also prevents the comparison of similar pitches that are classified as different pitch types.

In 2016, for example, Ubaldo Jimenez's sinker averaged 91.12 mph, -7.35 inches of horizontal movement and 8.53 inches of vertical movement, while Jeremy Hellickson's four-seam fastball had nearly identical averages of 90.81 mph, -7.63 inches of horizontal movement and 8.44 inches of vertical movement. Due to this issue, Loftus [13] conceded that his own method is best suited for comparing individual pitches as opposed to comparing pitchers based on their entire arsenal. Gennaro [3] has proposed a more qualitative approach to measuring pitcher similarity by using a hand-selected set of features and weightings. The features used by this method include a pitcher's two most-common pitch types and his most-common two-pitch sequence.

In this work, we develop a pitcher similarity measure that considers the speed and movement of every pitch. We note that other factors that are less indicative of a pitcher's raw stuff such as pitch location [4], sequencing [5], and deception [14] also play a role in determining performance.

Read the full article...

This is a BP Fantasy article. To read it, sign up today!

July 10, 2017 6:00 am

The Buyer's Guide: Orlando Arcia

4

Eric Roseberry

Does a recently high batting average bode well for Arcia's immediate fantasy future?

Orlando Arcia made his major-league debut in 2016. Initially, his fantasy value was thought to be limited because his defense was his most valuable asset. Over the course of those 55 games, Arcia hit .219/.273/.358 with four home runs, 21 runs scored, 17 RBIs and eight stolen bases. His fantasy stock wasn’t high coming into 2017. Arcia did rate as a two-star player in Mike Gianella’s initial shortstop rankings, but Mike admitted this was “a speculative pick based on stats from a year ago.”

The rest of this article is restricted to Baseball Prospectus Subscribers.

Not a subscriber?

Click here for more information on Baseball Prospectus subscriptions or use the buttons to the right to subscribe and get access to the best baseball content on the web.


Cancel anytime.


That's a 33% savings over the monthly price!


That's a 33% savings over the monthly price!

Already a subscriber? Click here and use the blue login bar to log in.

This is a BP Fantasy article. To read it, sign up today!

July 3, 2017 6:00 am

The Buyer's Guide: Michael A. Taylor

2

Eric Roseberry

He's running with an opportunity to play—but how long can Taylor keep up this kind of production?

Michael Taylor entered the season with limited fantasy value. The addition of Adam Eaton made Taylor the odd-man out in Washington’s outfield. However, injuries to several players (Eaton and Jayson Werth) have made playing time available. The 26-year-old is running with the opportunity, and he started to draw serious interest from fantasy owners.

Taylor saw the biggest change in ownership rate at CBS (19 percent to 48 percent) over the past week. Similarly, he saw the largest increase at ESPN (4.5 percent to 39.3 percent). In Yahoo’s latest “Transaction Trends,” Taylor was a top-10 addition in the outfield. He’s currently a top-50 outfielder by ESPN’s player rater, and he’s been providing owners with positive values in every standard fantasy category.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Fantasy article. To read it, sign up today!

June 20, 2017 4:42 pm

The Buyer's Guide: Mallex Smith

0

Eric Roseberry

With malace toward none but stolen bases toward many, here's Mallex Smith.

“It is a mistake to think that moving fast is the same as actually going somewhere.”

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Fantasy article. To read it, sign up today!

June 19, 2017 6:00 am

Fantasy Freestyle: The Evolution and Decline of Francisco Lindor

10

George Bissell

His home runs are up, but what about his batting average and stolen bases? Lindor hasn't been nearly as valuable as in recent seasons, and it seems to stem from an early season power surge.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

May 17, 2017 6:00 am

The Call-Up: Bradley Zimmer

0

Erich Rothmann and George Bissell

A top prospect, Zimmer has a power-speed combo that has become increasingly rare in fantasy, and because of Cleveland's injury troubles in the outfield, is getting a chance to contribute now. What can we expect?

The Situation: The Indians outfield is in dire need of help due to the injuries to Abraham Almonte, Brandon Guyer and Austin Jackson. Also, while Michael Brantley has hit fairly well so far, his playing time is being managed cautiously given his recent injury history. They have addressed this situation by calling up Zimmer, one of their top prospects (No. 3 in our 2017 Indians organizational ranking).

Background: Cleveland selected Zimmer 21st overall in the 2014 amateur draft, and the start of his first full pro season could not have gone much better. After he slashed .308/.403/.493, hit 10 homers, and stole 32 bases in 335 plate appearances for High-A Lynchburg, he was named to the Carolina League All-Star team and participated in the Futures Game. However, he struggled with Double-A Akron in the second half of the season, in large part because he tried to play with a hairline fracture in his right foot. The 24-year-old’s stock fell in 2016 after striking out 115 times in just 407 plate appearances with Akron, and 56 times in 150 plate appearances for Triple-A Columbus. Zimmer got off to a better start with Columbus before his promotion, as he slashed .294/.371/.532, along with five homers, nine stolen bases, and “only” 43 strikeouts through 144 plate appearances.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

Should pitchers be going up the ladder on low-power hitters or is that a danger zone?

The game of baseball moves like ivy, spreading upwards and outwards toward opportunity, consistent and chaotic. There are times in this growth where it tangles with itself, spins into contradictions. For years it drove managers to madness when their pitchers walked batters, and yet the batters themselves were encouraged by the same coaches to put the ball in play, show enough courage to take the bat off the shoulder. That seeming inequality grew as a consequence of a different priority, the valor of the productive out, available to the hitter and not his opponent.

As the culture of the game slowly grew to accept the walk and its benefits, another bias lingered: the idea that ground balls were beneficial to pitchers, while opposing hitters were often taught to swing downward on the ball and achieve that exact same result. The same cultural preference, of the ball in play (especially that vaunted achievement, the grounder to the right side with the runner on second), also promoted this strangely inconsistent set of philosophies. But batted-ball data and research has proven the benefits of not only swinging for line drives, but even putting the ball in the air compared to the grounder so long thought superior.

Read the full article...

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

March 10, 2017 6:00 am

Flu-Like Symptoms: Power and Speed

4

Rob Mains

Using a Bill James metric on a broader scale.

Bill James popularized sabermetrics. Hell, he coined the term. Several of his measures, like runs created, are still in popular use today, and his work has formed the basis for many sabermetric advances. But James created other measures that combine whimsy with measurement.

One is the power/speed number. It attempts to identify players who excel at both. It’s a simple formula: 2 x (HR x SB) / (SB +HR). That’s not #gorymath; it’s not even #goryalgebra, even if you add that it represents the harmonic mean of home runs and stolen bases.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

July 8, 2014 6:00 am

Baseball Therapy: What is a Fast Runner Worth?

7

Russell A. Carleton

Where should a manager bat his burners? And how much does it matter?

“He brings us that athletic dimension that we’ve been missing.”

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

April 16, 2014 11:08 am

Overthinking It: Does Baseball Have a Pace Problem?

25

Ben Lindbergh

Time of game and time between pitches.

On June 13, 2012, in a close but otherwise unmemorable game at Great American Ball Park between the Reds and Indians, Joey Votto and Derek Lowe reminded us what baseball is missing:

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

Is it time to bring back the Herb Washington-style dedicated pinch-sprinter?

We all have radical ideas that we’d like to see implemented: the all-reliever pitching staff, the perfectly optimized lineup, the corner outfielders swapping based on batter handedness, etc. Until somebody puts them into play, they’re just ideas. What Charlie Finley did, then, was a favor to us all: He took one of those ideas and put it in play. And when it failed, we got to move on. We never had to talk about it again. For once, a crazy idea tried, tested, and settled.

Read the full article...

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

February 20, 2014 6:00 am

Top Tools: Best Speed/Makeup

63

Mark Anderson and BP Prospect Staff

Part two of a several-part series on the top tools in the minors.

Scouts spend countless hours watching and evaluating players, carefully considering the appropriate grade for each tool or each pitch a player offers. Throughout the course of the season and particularly throughout the course of ranking season, grades are tossed around with near reckless abandon. This player has plus power, and that player has a below-average fastball. This player offers above-average hit projection while that player buries hitters with a potential plus-plus curveball. It's easy to talk about the quality of an individual tool, but what does it all mean in the context of other players?

In the second edition of the annual Top Tools Series, the Baseball Prospectus Prospect Staff debated long and hard over how individual players’ tools stack up against those of their counterparts. Drawing upon our own eyewitness accounts and opinions from scouts across the league, the team debated and compiled the following ratings. The end result is a product that captures the oft-missing context of how individual player tools compare and who has the best of each tool in baseball.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

<< Previous Tag Entries No More Tag Entries