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April 15, 2009 12:29 pm

Prospectus Today: The DiSars

7

Joe Sheehan

Hack-tastic good times make for another season-opening exercise in finding the few, the proud, the men who avoid ball four.

The DiSars are a fun thing I came up with about a decade ago, a tongue-in-cheek tribute to former Angels shortstop Gary DiSarcina. The hack-tastic infielder, who drew 154 walks in more than 4,000 plate appearances during his 12-year career, said in early 1998 that he would be perfectly happy if he never drew a walk. At the time, he was more than 60 plate appearances into his campaign without seeing ball four for the first time that season.

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December 12, 2007 12:00 am

The Class of 2008

0

Jay Jaffe

JAWS returns to take on the newest additions to the Hall of Fame ballot. Today, Jay takes a close look at the infielders.

We've already torn the wrapping paper off this year's Hall of Fame ballot class in the form of its brightest new addition, Tim Raines. And well we should have; the contrast between the general perception of Raines' Hall-worthiness and the robust strength of his numbers and overall case merited the heightened level of attention he received upon the ballot's initial release. Now it's time to hunker down and address the rest of this year's crop.

Aside from Raines, it's a less controversial one than last year's slate, when the first wave of performance-enhanced sluggers reached the ballot. Admitted steroid users Jose Canseco and the late Ken Caminiti were easily swept aside by the voters--respectively garnering 1.1 percent and 0.4 percent--while Mark McGwire, the most widely-suspected user this side of Barry Bonds, received just 23.5 percent, enough to keep him on the ballot but less than one-third of the votes he'll need to make it into the Hall. Aside from Raines and the perennial drama surrounding the candidacy of holdovers Goose Gossage and Bert Blyleven, further clues as to Big Mac's fate may be the most interesting aspect of this year's voting.

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May 4, 2007 12:00 am

Prospectus Today: The DiSar Awards

0

Joe Sheehan

Joe's update on the race to not draw a walk in both leagues.

One of these things is not like the others

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May 26, 2006 12:00 am

Prospectus Today: The DiSars

0

Joe Sheehan

The NL DiSar Award looks like it might take up permanent residence in the South, but remember, these things are often won in the summer.

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Steven follows up his most recent column on B.J. Upton with some responses to reader mail.

The day after the YCLIU on a possible position change for B.J. Upton went up here at BP, MLB.com posted two stories relevant to the discussion. The first, on Upton himself, emphasized that--like a latter day Curt Flood less concerned with which team he plays for than with what position he plays--he will not be moved. The second, on Dodgers prospect Joel Guzman, reported that from now on he will play--they don't know where, they just know it isn't shortstop. A follow-up on Guzman highlights his pragmatism, making for a strong contrast with Upton's intransigence:

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August 14, 2003 12:00 am

"This is Our Fault"

0

Steven Goldman

In the July 25 edition of Transaction Analysis, Chris Kahrl critiqued the trade of reliever Mike Williams from the Pirates to the Phillies: There are other cranky topics, particularly the re-failure to acquire talent for Mike Williams in this year's Williams deal. Certainly, if it reflected any new appreciation for the interchangeability of closers beyond the top few personalities in the field, that would be nifty, but instead, it seems that people (appropriately) don't take Williams particularly seriously as a commodity, so the Pirates got things bad both ways, in terms of plugging in a replacement-level talent in the job, enriching him, and then not enriching themselves when the time came to deal him. Kahrl's analysis could be applied to the entire trading history of the Pirates franchise, a three-handed process in which the hometown GM extends a good player with one hand, accepts his return with the another, and pinches his nose shut with the third. The top 10 list of best trades in the history of the franchise remains virgin territory, while the worst-10 list provides for an overstuffed buffet of empty calorie choices. This article is a compendium of self-inflicted wounds suffered since the acquisition of the franchise by Kevin McClatchy. After the institution of the amateur draft in 1965 democratized (at least on paper) talent acquisition, a broken franchise, particularly an impoverished broken franchise, could right itself through a combination of smart trading, free-agent signings, and the rewards offered to losing teams by the draft. Over a long span lasting at least since the waning days of Barry Bonds as a Buc, the Pirates have consistently failed at all three.

Kahrl's analysis could be applied to the entire trading history of the Pirates franchise, a three-handed process in which the hometown GM extends a good player with one hand, accepts his return with the another, and pinches his nose shut with the third (see Part Two for the nearly complete cavalcade of Pittsburgh trading misfires). The top 10 list of best trades in the history of the franchise remains virgin territory, while the worst-10 list provides for an overstuffed buffet of empty calorie choices.

This article is a compendium of self-inflicted wounds suffered since the acquisition of the franchise by Kevin McClatchy. After the institution of the amateur draft in 1965 democratized (at least on paper) talent acquisition, a broken franchise, particularly an impoverished broken franchise, could right itself through a combination of smart trading, free-agent signings, and the rewards offered to losing teams by the draft. Over a long span lasting at least since the waning days of Barry Bonds as a Buc, the Pirates have consistently failed at all three.

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April 7, 2003 12:00 am

Prospectus Today: Small Sample Size Tzuris

0

Joe Sheehan

For the second time in five days, Joe Sheehan explores the options available to a team losing a star to a dislocated shoulder. Plus, the Disar Awards return!

Organizations regularly ignore this basic tenet. A six-game losing streak that makes a team 36-46 will be unpleasant; if it makes a team 0-6, it can get people fired. Hell, sometimes reasonably intelligent columnists will forget this, and write about how the first three games of the season indicate that the Braves' offense could be a real problem, just in time for them to score 26 runs over the weekend.

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July 1, 2002 7:41 pm

The Week in Quotes: June 24-30, 2002

0

Derek Zumsteg

STRIKE! STRIKE! "If you have kids who might [grow up to] be major league baseball players, we're fighting for your kids, possibly. If I work for your newspaper and you're in the union fighting for your equality and rights, sure I would strike, and so would you..." --Barry Bonds, Giants outfielder

STRIKE! STRIKE!

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June 18, 2002 10:41 am

The Daily Prospectus: The Daily Prospectus: DiSars Update

0

Joe Sheehan

It's all about veteran leadership. I thought I might be able to put a cap on the DiSar Awards for this year, but I can't. Not yet. Not with one of the all-time great hackers finding his way into the lineup�despite a 390 OPS�and keeping the heat on the leaders in the clubhouse.

 It's all about veteran leadership.

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I thought I might be able to put a cap on the DiSar Awards for this year, but I can't. Not yet. Not with one of the all-time great hackers finding his way into the lineup-despite a 390 OPS-and keeping the heat on the leaders in the clubhouse.

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ON STADIA

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Some of you may remember a play from the 2000 postseason that generated a lot of discussion. It occurred near the end of Game 3 of the NL Division Series between the Mets and the Giants. With one out in the top of the ninth, the Giants' Armando Rios was on second base representing the tying run. Rich Aurilia hit a ground ball in front of Rios to shortstop Mike Bordick. Rios lit out for third base, and was thrown out by a wide margin.

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