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Articles Tagged Second Basemen 

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January 24, 2008 12:00 am

Schrodinger's Bat: Simple Fielding Runs Version 1.0

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Dan Fox

With a few minor tweaks, Simple Fielding Runs version 1.0 is ready for release.

"Let him hit it, you've got fielders behind you."
--Alexander Cartwright, attributed by Bob Chieger in Voices of Baseball


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December 13, 2007 12:00 am

Schrodinger's Bat: Inching Along

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Dan Fox

Fueled by reader feedback, Dan makes some adjustments to his new defensive metric.

"The subject may appear an insignificant one, but we shall see that it possesses some interest, and the maxim 'de minimis lex non curat'--the law is not concerned with trifles--does not apply to science."
--Charles Darwin, from the preface of his book The Formation of Vegetable Mould, Through the Action of Worms, With Observations on Their Habits (1881)


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July 11, 2007 12:00 am

Looking Ahead

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John Perrotto

A quick overview of what to expect from all 30 ballclubs.

It has already been the year of the milestone in baseball. Trevor Hoffman became the first reliever ever to reach 500 saves. Sammy Sosa hit his 600th home run and Frank Thomas belted his 500th. Craig Biggio got to 3,000 hits, and Roger Clemens reached 350 wins. The biggest milestone of all is just around the corner-Barry Bonds has 751 home runs, four away from Hank Aaron's all-time record.

Aside from personal achievements, a number of interesting races are developing in the two leagues and six divisions. Now that the All-Star Game is behind us, here is a division-by-division look at what to expect in the second half of the season:

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February 13, 2007 12:00 am

Lies, Damned Lies: PECOTA Takes on Second Base Prospects

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Nate Silver

Nate examines the curious discrepancy between conventional prospect rankings and PECOTA with regards to second basemen, and defends one of his projection system's favorite young players.

PECOTA sings a far more optimistic tune when it comes to second basemen. Kendrick was its #1 overall prospect last year, Dustin Pedroia was #4, and Barfield and Ian Kinsler ranked 13th and 14th, respectively. Second basemen don't do quite as well this year, but Pedroia is back, and joined by several other players who are sure to be ranked higher by PECOTA than by most other systems.

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March 22, 2006 12:00 am

Lies, Damned Lies: Rethinking Replacement Level

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Nate Silver

Nate wonders if there's still more to be learned when it comes to considering replacement level talent.

To answer this simple question, I performed a search for players for all players since 1985 that met the following criteria:

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March 7, 2006 12:00 am

Doctoring The Numbers: The Draft, Part Eight

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Rany Jazayerli

The Good Doctor returns with Part Eight of his draft study, focusing on college hitters.

Last time, we looked at the relative merits of high school players by position, ending with this chart:

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September 22, 2005 12:00 am

Lies, Damned Lies: A New Look at Aging

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Nate Silver

Nate uses Joe Crede and poker as points of departure to investigate when position players peak.

This week’s column was originally supposed to be a break from the usual LDL routine, inspired by Tuesday night’s fantastic white Sox/Indians game, which I got to take in with New York Sun buddy Tim Marchman. Tim and I have some mysterious, voodoo-like power when we go to Sox games together. Earlier this year,

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September 13, 2005 12:00 am

Doctoring The Numbers: The Draft, Part Seven

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Rany Jazayerli

Rany returns with a look at the value of high-school hitters drafted between 1984 and 1999.

Using the technique described in the last part of this draft series, here's a breakdown of draft pick value for college and high school players, separated into pitchers and regulars, from 1984 through 1999:

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December 16, 2004 12:00 am

The Class of 2005

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Jay Jaffe

There are 16 position players on the Hall of Fame ballot. Jay Jaffe thinks three of them belong in Cooperstown.

These new metrics enable us to identify candidates who are as good or better than the average Hall of Famer at their position. By promoting those players for election, we can avoid further diluting the quality of the Hall's membership. Clay Davenport's Translations make an ideal tool for this endeavor because they normalize all performance records in major-league history to the same scoring environment, adjusting for park effects, quality of competition and length of schedule. All pitchers, hitters and fielders are thus rated above or below one consistent replacement level, making cross-era comparisons a breeze. Though non-statistical considerations--awards, championships, postseason performance--shouldn't be left by the wayside in weighing a player's Hall of Fame case, they're not the focus here.

Since election to the Hall of Fame requires a player to perform both at a very high level and for a long time, it's inappropriate to rely simply on career Wins Above Replacement (WARP, which for this exercise refers exclusively to the adjusted-for-all-time version. WARP3). For this process I also identified each player's peak value as determined by the player's WARP in his best five consecutive seasons (with allowances made for seasons lost to war or injury). That choice is an admittedly arbitrary one; I simply selected a peak vaue that was relatively easy to calculate and that, at five years, represented a minimum of half the career of a Hall of Famer.

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January 6, 2004 12:00 am

The Class of 2004

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Jay Jaffe

With the 2004 STATLG-L Hall of Fame balloting now in the books, and the results of the BBWAA voting slated to be released this afternoon, there are few topics more prominent in baseball fans' minds than "Which players will make it to Cooperstown in 2004?" And rightfully so. Enshrinement in the Baseball Hall of Fame is the highest honor a former-player can receive, and most fans are protective of that: a fact that has spurned countless heated debates over the years--rational, objective, and otherwise. With that being said, I thought it would interesting to see what some of Baseball Prospectus' newly updated measures of player evaluation had to say on the topic. For the uninitiated, BP's Davenport Translated Player Cards measure a player's value above replacement level for offense, defense, and pitching while adjusting for context--park effects, level of offense, era, length of season, and in Clay's own words, "the distortions caused by not having to face your own team's defense." The Davenport Cards offer the most sophisticated statistical summaries available; if you can adjust for it, it's in there. The basic currencies of the Davenport system, whether it's offense, defense, or pitching, are runs and wins, more specifically, runs above replacement level and wins above replacement level.

With the 2004 STATLG-L Hall of Fame balloting now in the books, and the results of the BBWAA voting slated to be released this afternoon, few topics are more prominent in baseball fans' minds than "Which players will make it to Cooperstown in 2004?"

And rightfully so. Enshrinement in the Baseball Hall of Fame is the highest honor a former-player can receive, and most fans are protective of that: a fact that has spurned countless heated debates over the years--rational, objective, and otherwise.

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