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Articles Tagged San Diego Padres 

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02-11

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1

Rubbing Mud: Three Evolving Hitters
by
Matthew Trueblood

01-20

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4

Outta Left Field: This Is the Padre Way
by
Dustin Palmateer

01-15

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0

Transaction Analysis: San Diego's Short-Term Shortstop Solution
by
Matthew Trueblood

01-05

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6

Rumor Roundup: The Slow Burn Of Ian Desmond's Free Agency
by
Daniel Rathman

12-31

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3

Best of BP 2015: The Season's Craziest Second-Half Split
by
Dustin Palmateer

12-11

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0

Transaction Analysis: The Ex-Prospects Challenge Trade
by
R.J. Anderson

12-09

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14

Outta Left Field: The Season's Craziest Second-Half Split
by
Dustin Palmateer

10-29

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2

Outta Left Field: Preller's Problems
by
Dustin Palmateer

05-22

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6

West Coast By Us: Day 1: In The Land Where Everybody Is Immediately Put On TV
by
Jake Mintz and Jordan Shusterman

05-04

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1

The Call-Up: Austin Hedges
by
Christopher Crawford and J.P. Breen

04-20

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4

Tools of Ignorance: The San Diego Hedgehogs?
by
Jeff Quinton

04-10

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28

Rubbing Mud: Carlos Quentin's DFA is This Godforsaken Era in a Nutshell
by
Matthew Trueblood

04-06

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33

Transaction Analysis: The Last Blockbuster of the Offseason
by
Matthew Trueblood, Mark Anderson, Bret Sayre and Wilson Karaman

04-01

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1

Transaction Analysis: Spring Shuffling
by
R.J. Anderson

03-25

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4

Painting the Black: Getting Personal
by
R.J. Anderson

03-18

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4

Every Team's Moneyball: San Diego Padres: Payroll Tetris
by
Doug Thorburn

03-12

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3

Rumor Roundup: The Only Thing Left That Matters Is Cuban
by
Daniel Rathman

03-11

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4

Rumor Roundup: Olivera, Why Not Take Olivera?
by
Chris Mosch

03-02

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4

Rumor Roundup: You Can't Predict Padres
by
Daniel Rathman

02-27

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9

Prospectus Feature: A.J. Preller's Offseason and the Toronto Precedent
by
Steven Jacobson

02-25

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2

Rumor Roundup: Closer Closer to Closing Deal
by
Daniel Rathman

02-10

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19

Tools of Ignorance: How the Padres Won the Offseason
by
Jeff Quinton

02-10

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0

Rumor Roundup: Mysterious Blob Will Attempt To Eat Yoan Moncada Next
by
Daniel Rathman

02-10

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13

Transaction Analysis: Padres Have Big Aims, James
by
Russell A. Carleton and Wilson Karaman

02-05

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2

Transaction Analysis: An Ax To Sign
by
R.J. Anderson

02-02

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1

Rumor Roundup: The Right-Handed Reliever You Covet For The Seventh Inning Might Still Be Available!
by
Daniel Rathman

01-13

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6

Rumor Roundup: Three Stories About NL West Teams Pursuing Pitching
by
Daniel Rathman

12-31

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0

Transaction Analysis: Rays Take A Cab
by
R.J. Anderson, Wilson Karaman and Nick Shlain

12-24

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34

2015 Prospects: San Diego Padres Top 10 Prospects
by
Nick J. Faleris and BP Prospect Staff

12-22

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8

Ninety Percent Mental: The Predictable Aggressiveness of a First-Year GM
by
Lewie Pollis

12-20

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10

Transaction Analysis: Padres Wish Upton a Star
by
R.J. Anderson, Wilson Karaman, Bret Sayre, Jordan Gorosh, Jeff Moore and Ethan Purser

12-19

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5

Transaction Analysis: Catchin' Relief
by
Matthew Trueblood, R.J. Anderson, Wilson Karaman, Mike Gianella, Jordan Gorosh and Chris Rodriguez

12-18

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4

Transaction Analysis: What the Rays and Nationals Got
by
Tucker Blair, Jordan Gorosh, Chris Rodriguez and J.P. Breen

12-18

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0

Rumor Roundup: Pitching at a Premium
by
Chris Mosch

12-18

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10

Skewed Left: Padres Can't Play It Safe
by
Zachary Levine

12-18

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9

Transaction Analysis: Padres Add Myers
by
R.J. Anderson, Wilson Karaman and Tucker Blair

12-17

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4

Transaction Analysis: Royals Bank on a Rios Rebound
by
R.J. Anderson, Ben Carsley and Nick Shlain

12-12

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8

Transaction Analysis: The Dodgers' First Dump
by
Craig Goldstein

12-10

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4

Fantasy Team Preview: San Diego Padres
by
Wilson Karaman

12-04

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7

Transaction Analysis: The First Zaidi-Friedman Eyebrow-Raiser
by
R.J. Anderson

11-18

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4

Rumor Roundup: Are the Jays Preparing to Splurge?
by
Daniel Rathman

11-06

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2

Fantasy Freestyle: What to Make of Odrisamer Despaigne
by
Keith Cromer

09-29

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8

Pebble Hunting: The Padres' Sad Team Leaders
by
Sam Miller

08-13

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3

The Call-Up: Rymer Liriano
by
Craig Goldstein

08-07

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4

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 509: How to Hire a GM
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

07-31

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0

Transaction Analysis: Chris Denorfia is in the News!
by
Mike Gianella and Jeff Quinton

07-23

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20

Transaction Analysis: Headley Chased
by
Sam Miller, Mike Gianella and Jeff Moore

07-21

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1

BP Unfiltered: Very Important Player We Missed: Odrisamer Despaigne
by
Sam Miller

07-19

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1

Transaction Analysis: Angels are in for a Street
by
R.J. Anderson, Chris Rodriguez and Mauricio Rubio

06-24

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BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 477: When Does a GM Deserve to Be Fired?
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

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What the past says about the futures of three once-bright stars.

About 13 months ago, I wrote a piece for Banished to the Pen examining the brutal 2014 seasons of three previously promising young hitters (Arismendy Alcantara, Jackie Bradley, Jr., and Wil Myers) and the implications of those campaigns on those players’ futures. The concept was a rough, statistical sketch of the players’ likely career arcs, without relying either on scouting information or the general narrative.

The piece seems to have mostly pegged Alcantara and Myers correctly. You can read the piece itself to see exactly what I found, but the gist for Alcantara was that the odds were stacked against long-term success for him because of his excessive strikeout rate, and indeed, that shortcoming crippled him in 2015, even after his demotion to Triple-A Iowa. Myers, meanwhile, managed a .288 TAv and 114 OPS+ when he was healthy—numbers that hew eerily closely to those of the people I found who compared closely to him through 2014.

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The plan of lost season has given way to something San Diego fans are used to: Mixed messages and a lack of direction.

As fans and analysts, we like it when a team has an easily identifiable plan we can follow along with, whether it's rebuilding for a better future or pressing the proverbial all-in button. There's a certain level of solidarity between team and fan (or team and analyst) when both sides are on the same page, allowing us to scroll through the transaction log and nod our collective heads—even if we disagree with a specific move or, in more extreme cases, the entire plan, we at least give the team a certain benefit of the doubt for formulating a course of action and sticking with it.

So when Chris Long tweeted this

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The Padres get at least something for their shortstop woes, while the Pirates reup Chris Stewart.

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The Padres and Ian Desmond fit nicely together, while Bronson Arroyo has unfinished business in Cincinnati.

Padres at least keeping tabs on Ian Desmond
Ian Desmond played shortstop last year. The Padres’ projected starting shortstop is Alexi Amarista, producer of a .205 TAv in 357 plate appearances last season. Ian Desmond is available. Which also means that, despite the obviousness of the match, he’s not yet donning San Diego’s new (old) colors.


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How Derek Norris suddenly got good at defense.

With the year winding to a close, Baseball Prospectus is revisiting some of our favorite articles of the year. This was originally published on December 9, 2015.

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December 11, 2015 6:00 am

Transaction Analysis: The Ex-Prospects Challenge Trade

0

R.J. Anderson

San Diego and Atlanta swap disappointing still-young ex-studs.

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How Derek Norris suddenly got good at defense.

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October 29, 2015 6:00 am

Outta Left Field: Preller's Problems

2

Dustin Palmateer

After pushing the proverbial all-in last winter, what do the Padres actually have now?

Rarely has a new GM treated his roster so much like a blank canvas as A.J. Preller did last winter. He traded liberally from his own farm system, committed to uncharacteristically large payrolls well into the future, and signed or traded for every famous name he could—acquiring the first five names on his Opening Day lineup card, along with his Opening Day starter and the back of his Opening Day bullpen. He covered the middle of that canvas but, in the absence of more time or resources, left the corners unfinished. The masterpiece was a counterfeit, and the Padres lost 88 games and their long-time manager. No rebuild in the 21st century looks more like a fantasy-baseball roster flurry than this one did.

What went wrong? It's not so simple as to say Preller's acquisitions disappointed. It's also not so simple as to say that the few holdovers that remained weren't good enough to support a playoff push. It's simple enough to say it was both.

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First step off the plane and the boys get a tv pilot, learn about the limitations of a big screen, see Kris Bryant do a thing and eat no In-N-Out.

Prologue

Planes are amazing things. Modern technology has enabled human beings to move at speeds faster than our ancestors ever thought possible. The jet engine has given rise to today’s sophisticated global economy, expedited world travel, and modernized military technology. But yesterday morning on our flight from Baltimore to San Diego, it allowed for something even more important: it allowed our seat neighbor Cindy to get absolutely hammered at 500 mph.

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May 4, 2015 6:00 am

The Call-Up: Austin Hedges

1

Christopher Crawford and J.P. Breen

The Padres call up a .257/.317/.392 career hitter, and it's must-see TV.

The situation: The second-place Padres have gotten big offensive numbers from Derek Norris (.880 OPS, 11 doubles going into Sunday) but have called up Hedges to replace the struggling Wil Nieves as the backup.

Background: Hedges was a highly-touted backstop coming out of JSerra High School in Orange County, CA, but a strong commitment to UCLA saw him slip into the second round, where many viewed him unsignable. San Diego convinced him with a $3 million dollar signing bonus and he quickly established himself as one of the best catching prospects in baseball. He was the no. 1 prospect on the BP Prospect Team’s Padres rankings this winter, and was the second-highest ranked catcher on the BP 101, trailing only recent Boston call-up Blake Swihart.

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Rethinking one man's assessment of the Padres' offseason brilliance.

In the offseason, I wrote an article titled How the Padres Won the Offseason. That article was written shortly after the James Shields signing and, therefore, less shortly after the acquisitions of Matt Kemp, Justin Upton, Wil Myers, Derek Norris and others. I praised the Padres because they seemed to be acquiring discounted talent wherever they could, regardless of fit, and were thus doing so relatively cheaply. The end product of these moves was the construction of a team that seemed potentially competitive, and at the very least improved, for a price below what anyone would have guessed it would cost to do so. As to what the Padres would do going forward, I wrote the following:

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Reexamining the loss of offense, through the lens of one DFA.

Carlos Quentin is the victim of the modern MLB roster, and he helps explain the offensive famine that has so starved us all for runs over the past five years. The Padres and Braves traded some bad contracts in order to balance out the Craig Kimbrel-for-prospects deal they struck on Sunday night, and Quentin was one of the spare parts rather casually tossed into the bed of the truck heading from San Diego to Atlanta. On Monday, Atlanta designated Quentin for assignment, an expected move that amounts to an admission: Quentin has negative value to both of the teams involved in this deal. His contract is simply a sunk cost, and the Padres got the Braves to pay what’s left of it. Quentin will, in all likelihood, hit the waiver wire during the next few days, and someone might claim him—though truthfully, I see only one promising fit, in Toronto, where Quentin could take Justin Smoak’s place as a bench bat, occasional first baseman and DH.

That’s actually a really good fit, though, and you know what? Five or 10 years ago, there would have been five other teams in a similarly good position to snatch up Quentin. He might even have had some asset value for Atlanta, instead of being waiver-wire fodder. That’s because, back then, teams were teetering between 11 and 12 pitchers on their rosters, instead of between 12 and 13. Go back 15 or 20 years, to the dimmest of my firsthand baseball memories, and you could find teams carrying as few as 10 pitchers on more days than not. In that era, Quentin—whose injury problems have derailed his career, but who remains a very good hitter, and whom PECOTA projects to post a .296 True Average this season—would have fit gorgeously onto any team’s bench. Every team could find room for a hitter of his abilities, even if he couldn’t be counted on to start.

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