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Articles Tagged Sample Size 

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05-09

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5

Baseball Therapy: Should I Worry About My Favorite Pitcher?
by
Russell A. Carleton

07-24

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6

Baseball Therapy: It Happens Every May
by
Russell A. Carleton

07-16

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16

Baseball Therapy: It's a Small Sample Size After All
by
Russell A. Carleton

12-02

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19

Prospectus Hit and Run: Resetting the Standard
by
Jay Jaffe

11-08

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14

Baseball ProGUESTus: Getting Explicit with Sample Sizes
by
Matt Lentzner

10-26

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16

Spinning Yarn: Can We Predict Hot and Cold Zones for Hitters?
by
Mike Fast

09-24

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71

Spinning Yarn: Removing the Mask Encore Presentation
by
Mike Fast

06-01

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6

Spinning Yarn: The Real Strike Zone, Part 2
by
Mike Fast

04-21

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5

Collateral Damage: The Concussion Discussion, Part II
by
Corey Dawkins and Marc Normandin

02-16

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59

Spinning Yarn: The Real Strike Zone
by
Mike Fast

08-29

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2

Between The Numbers: The PITCHf/x Summit Quasi-Liveblog
by
Ben Lindbergh

05-28

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1

Ahead in the Count: Hometown Discounts
by
Matt Swartz

04-26

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4

Baseball Therapy: The Difference Between Night and Day
by
Russell A. Carleton

04-21

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6

Fantasy Beat: When Sample Size Matters
by
Marc Normandin

04-08

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2

Manufactured Runs: April is the Cruelest Month
by
Colin Wyers

01-22

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43

Under The Knife: Frickin' Laser Beams, Part 1
by
Will Carroll

08-05

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17

Changing Speeds: PECOTAs Wild Pitches
by
Ken Funck

07-23

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55

Changing Speeds: PECOTA's Strikeouts
by
Ken Funck

07-05

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14

Prospectus Idol Entry: Cartwright Interview Transcript
by
Brian Cartwright

02-12

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24

Future Shock: Royals Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

03-18

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0

Prospectus Today: It Doesn't Count
by
Joe Sheehan

03-13

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0

Prospectus Hit and Run: Running Afoul
by
Jay Jaffe

04-09

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0

Prospectus Today: Playing Games
by
Joe Sheehan

10-06

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0

Prospectus Matchups: October Musings
by
Jim Baker

04-18

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0

Prospectus Today: Confirmation Bias
by
Joe Sheehan

03-03

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0

Lies, Damned Lies: PECOTA Takes on Prospects, Part Four
by
Nate Silver

12-01

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0

Crooked Numbers: Plop Plop Fizz Fizz
by
James Click

09-13

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0

Doctoring The Numbers: The Draft, Part Seven
by
Rany Jazayerli

08-04

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0

Crooked Numbers: Objects at Rest
by
James Click

06-24

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0

Prospectus Notebook: Friday Edition
by
Baseball Prospectus

05-10

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0

Prospectus Triple Play: Florida Marlins, New York Yankees, Pittsburgh Pirates
by
Derek Jacques

04-27

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0

Lies, Damned Lies: Does Size Matter?
by
Nate Silver

04-21

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0

Crooked Numbers: April Fools
by
James Click

04-13

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0

Prospectus Triple Play: Florida Marlins, New York Yankees, Pittsburgh Pirates
by
Derek Jacques

03-07

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0

Fantasy Focus: Fantasy Feng-Shui
by
Erik Siegrist

03-03

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0

Crooked Numbers: The Morning After
by
James Click

02-24

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0

Crooked Numbers: More on the Lineup
by
James Click

02-21

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0

Prospectus Roundtable: Top 50 Prospects, Part I
by
Baseball Prospectus

02-20

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0

Baseball Prospectus Basics: Statistical Consistency
by
James Click

02-19

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0

Baseball Prospectus Basics: Measuring Offense
by
Dayn Perry

05-29

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0

Aim For The Head: Simulating Catcher's ERA
by
Keith Woolner

05-22

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0

Prospectus Feature: Analyzing PAP (Part Two)
by
Keith Woolner

05-22

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0

Analyzing PAP (Part Two)
by
Keith Woolner

05-21

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0

Prospectus Feature: Analyzing PAP (Part One)
by
Keith Woolner

05-21

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0

Analyzing PAP (Part One)
by
Keith Woolner

04-18

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0

Sensible Revenue Sharing
by
Keith Woolner

07-18

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0

Doctoring The Numbers: The Burroughs Hypothesis
by
Rany Jazayerli

09-22

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0

From The Mailbag: Umpire Stolen Base Rates and Scott Sheldon
by
Baseball Prospectus

01-10

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0

Field General or Backstop?
by
Keith Woolner

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When pitching stats stabilize.

Of course. He's a pitcher.

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July 24, 2012 5:00 am

Baseball Therapy: It Happens Every May

6

Russell A. Carleton

When we say that certain stats "stabilize" after a certain point, we don't mean that they'll stay stable.

It happens every May. Someone on your favorite team is having an uncharacteristically good (or bad) year. This year, David Wright got his groove back, while his former teammate Jose Reyes lost his way. Edwin Encarnacion and Carlos Ruiz started hitting home runs for no apparent reason. For a while, Albert Pujols (!) was stuck in a very public home run drought. Early in the season, analysts and fans have learned to (properly) dismiss these runs as small sample size flukes. They’re something to keep an eye on, but... he'll be back to normal soon.

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Russell reruns the numbers to determine when hitter stats stabilize.

Who said sabermetrics hasn't gone mainstream? We've now reached the point where even mainstream analysts are yelling "small sample size!" at one another. There's always been some understanding that a player who goes 4-for-5 in a game is not really an .800 hitter, but now, people are being more explicit in talking about sample size. I consider that a victory. Hooray for sabermetrics!

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December 2, 2011 9:00 am

Prospectus Hit and Run: Resetting the Standard

19

Jay Jaffe

Redefining the JAWS equation sets a new standard for Hall of Fame induction.

This time of year is a busy stretch if you're a Hall of Fame buff, or at least this particular Hall of Fame buff. The 2012 BBWAA ballot was released on Wednesday, adding 13 new candidates to the 14 holdovers from last year's ballot. I'll start digging into the details of those candidacies starting at some point late next week. Meanwhile, the vote on the Golden Era candidates will take place at the Winter Meetings in Dallas this coming Monday, December 5; alas, I think I’m actually going to be in the air when the results are announced, but I’ll weigh in upon arrival. Earlier this week, I had the opportunity to discuss some of the Golden Era candidates on television as part of my debut appearance on MLB Network's new show, “Clubhouse Confidential.” It wasn't my first time on TV, but I believe it was my first time discussing JAWS in that medium. Explaining the system concisely AND discussing the merits of a handful of candidates in a four-minute span was certainly a challenge, but host Brian Kenny and his producers seemed quite pleased with the segment, and there’s reason to believe that it won't be the last time I appear on the show.

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A's prospect Michael Choice is having quite the AFL season, but what can his success tell us about how stats should be presented?

Believe it or not, most of our writers didn't enter the world sporting an @baseballprospectus.com address; with a few exceptions, they started out somewhere else. In an effort to up your reading pleasure while tipping our caps to some of the most illuminating work being done elsewhere on the internet, we'll be yielding the stage once a week to the best and brightest baseball writers, researchers and thinkers from outside of the BP umbrella. If you'd like to nominate a guest contributor (including yourself), please drop us a line.

Matt Lentzner has carved out a (very) small niche in the baseball analysis world by examining the intersection of physics and biomechanics. He has presented at the PITCHf/x conference in each of the last two years and has written articles for The Hardball Times, as well as a previous articles for Baseball Prospectus. When he’s not writing, Matt works on his physics-based baseball simulator, which is so awesome and all-encompassing that it will likely never actually be finished, though it does provide the inspiration for most of his articles and presentations. In real life, he’s an IT Director at a small financial consulting company in the Silicon Valley and also runs a physical training gym in his backyard on the weekends.

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When is hot truly hot, and when is it not?

A few weeks ago, during the division series, Brandon McCarthy remarked on Twitter that it would be more interesting for TBS to show a diagram of the batter hot and cold zones for every batter than to show the PitchTrax strike zone and pitch location graphic. He argued that knowledge of the hot and cold zones would give viewers additional insight into the battle between the pitcher and the batter.

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In case you missed Mike Fast's extraordinary research into quantifying the heretofore hidden contributions of catchers, we're moving it back to the top of the list for the weekend.

I Was Framed
Catchers play a central role in the game of baseball through their involvement with every pitch that their pitchers throw. One of their key tasks is receiving borderline pitches without discouraging the umpire from calling strikes.


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When it comes to determining the actual upper and lower boundaries of the zone, pitchers may have more to tell us than the players at the plate.

Three months ago, I investigated the nature of the major-league strike zone, focusing on its inside and outside boundaries. I concluded that the location of a pitch relative to the catcher’s target had a significant impact on the umpire’s likelihood of calling a strike. This article will examine the top and bottom boundaries of the strike zone.

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April 21, 2011 9:00 am

Collateral Damage: The Concussion Discussion, Part II

5

Corey Dawkins and Marc Normandin

Running the numbers with the aid of the injury database to determine how players who suffer concussions perform after returning to the field.

On Tuesday we discussed the addition of a 7-day disabled list for concussions to the MLB rules, as well as the progress being made on that front in terms of diagnoses and treatment. We mentioned that in the past, concussions had been believed to be something that happened only in the more violent NFL and NHL, due to the size, power, speed, and concussive force of the athletes involved. That is not true, though, as baseball players have suffered their fair share of head trauma in the last decade alone. Baseball players may not be able to catch a puck on the other side of the rink before icing is called or chase a halfback downfield prior to delivering the killing blow, but their knees still hurt when taken upside the head, and a fastball or liner to the cranium can do plenty of damage, too.

Our database goes back to 2003; in that stretch, there were 100 incidents diagnosed as concussions (including Yunel Escobar's from this year). Recovery from these concussions varied in length, with the shortest amount of time missed coming in at just one game (in fact, 19 of the concussions in the database caused just one game to be missed. On the high end, 108 games were lost. There are far fewer extended DL stays than short ones—after 108 comes 106, and after that the time frame drops to Justin Morneau's 78 games—but there are enough lengthy ones in there to bump up the average time lost.

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Examining umpire calling and catcher framing leads to thought-provoking questions about the amorphous nature of the strike zone.

Ever since the PITCHf/x system debuted in the 2006 playoffs, people have been interested in what it says about the strike zone that the umpires call.

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A comprehensive recap of a big day for FIELDf/x.

I have seen the future, and its name is FIELDf/x. OK, so we kind of knew that. But today, FIELDf/x started to seem a lot more real, and even more exciting than I’d imagined. You may have noticed that BP had a man on the scene at Sportvision’s PITCHf/x summit whose liveblog was actually live. So why am I doing this, when Colin already did? Well, for one thing, Colin arrived fashionably late, and I was all over those first 14 minutes that he missed. For another, his computer died before a lot of the fun started. And for still another (this is a third reason, now), I thought it might be fun to do a Simmons-style quasi-liveblog (written live, published later) that would free me from worries about frequent updates, and allow me to write at length. Most likely that length turned out to be a good deal longer than anyone has any interest in reading, but if you’re determined to catch up on the day’s intriguing events without sitting through eight hours of archived video, you’re welcome to peruse what lies below. If you’d like to follow along, here’s an agenda, and here’s where you should be able to find downloadable presentations in the near future.

Here we are in sunny California, home of the cutest girls in the world, if the Beach Boys are to be believed (I gather there’s also a more recent chart-topper that expresses a similar view). Okay, so by “we,” I mean the attendees at the 3rd (annual?) Sportvision PITCHf/x summit, held at the Westin San Francisco in—you guessed it—San Francisco. I, on the other hand, am watching from the other end of the continent, via a webcast that dubiously claims to be “hi-res,” despite being blurry enough to make deciphering text an adventure (I guess “hi-res” is relative, in the sense that there are even lower resolutions at which it could’ve been streamed). And sure, maybe the Beach Boys weren’t thinking of this particular gathering when they extolled the virtues of California’s beach bunnies. But never mind that—it’s a beautiful Saturday afternoon here in New York, and how better to spend it than to watch a video of some fellow nerds talk about baseball in a dark room some 3,000 miles away? Well, to describe the experience at the same time, of course. Let’s get this quasi-liveblog started.

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May 28, 2010 9:19 am

Ahead in the Count: Hometown Discounts

1

Matt Swartz

The best way to build a winning organization is to draft and develop talent then know which players to keep for the long haul.

While last week’s article contrasting the cost of re-signees vs. the cost of other people’s players, or “OPP,” made a strong point that there is a difference between these two groups of players, many readers had questions about various issues, including hometown discounts, the performance of the two groups of players before the deals, and whether the decline was a matter of a decrease in playing time or production.  In this article, I break down each of these factors and use them to learn more about the cost of other people’s players.

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