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Articles Tagged Sammy Sosa 

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Jason goes looking for Hall of Famers and finds none.

The first thing I'd like to do is thank the BBWAA for admitting me to its ranks even though I'm merely a part-time blogger and weekly contributor to a website that has, in the past, had as an implicit mission statement the Association's destruction.

The second thing I'd like to do is thank the BBWAA for waiving its usual 10-year rule whereby one does not acquire a Hall of Fame vote until one has been a member of the Association for a decade. Really, you're too kind.

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August 24, 2012 5:00 am

Pebble Hunting: The Rockies and Real Home Run Hitters

5

Sam Miller

Giancarlo Stanton's recent rampage against the Rockies inspires two questions: Have the Rockies ever had a "real" power hitter? And if not, why the heck haven't they?

We'll start as soon as Giancarlo Stanton's home run in Coors Field from last Friday night lands.

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Who are some of baseball's best cheats in the non-chemically-enhanced division?

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September 2, 2007 12:00 am

Future Shock: Mailbag

0

Kevin Goldstein

Keeping his head above water, Kevin responds to some readers' questions about his most recent articles.

The last two weeks have been pretty busy over here at KG central, with lots of external distractions, and my county being declared a disaster area. Because of this, I'm fallen behind on my mail, so let's do some catch-up and share with the class along the way.

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April 14, 2006 12:00 am

Transaction Analysis: April 11-13

0

Christina Kahrl

The Cubs re-up their star slugger, the Red Sox buy out some arb years of their injured center fielder, the Brewers have their eye on Blue Jays, and the fifth starters start to emerge from the minors.

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March 30, 2006 12:00 am

2006--Setting the Stage

0

Jay Jaffe

With Jeff Bagwell's career potentially coming to an end, Jay looks at his Hall of Fame chances, plus the chances of some other players who may call 2005 their last year.

For all of the drama and closure that late-season cameo may have provided to Bagwell's career, its price tag may prove astronomical. Earlier this week, Connecticut General Life Insurance denied a total disability claim which would have allowed the Astros to recoup $15.6 million of Bagwell's $17 million salary for the year. Despite Bagwell's unsuccessful attempt to prove himself healthy enough to start the season as the team's first baseman and his subsequent placement on the disabled list, "The company determined that there had been no adverse change in Mr. Bagwell's condition or ability to play baseball between the end of last season, when he was an active member of the roster, and Jan. 31, 2006, the date the policy expired." [emphasis added]

Upon being placed on the DL, Bagwell conceded, "I may never play again," but the denial of the claim--which the Astros will contest--paradoxically opens the door for the 37-year-old's career to continue. Had the claim been accepted, no amount of progress in rehabilitation would have justified Bagwell's return to the team later in the year. If owner Drayton McLane and his legal hounds are unable to gain some relief, AND if Bagwell undergoes surgery for bone spurs AND still has the desire to play AND makes progress in the training room, he may yet step up to the plate in Minute Maid Park once again. Still, as MLB.com's Alyson Footer noted the other day, Bagwell's day of reckoning makes it appropriate to reflect on on Number 5's stellar 15-year career.

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September 5, 2005 12:00 am

Swinging for the Fences

0

Will Carroll and Mike Carminati

Will Carroll and Mike Carminati wonder if swinging and missing is that big of a deal, and their findings may surprise you.

Just as an out-of-the-blue bolt of plate discipline presaged Sosa's assent, his decline might have been predicted by his tendency to swing and miss that haunted him even in his stellar 1999 season. Sosa swung at and missed 475 pitches in his record-setting 1999 campaign. This is the highest total for any major-league batter over the last five seasons and isn't the "swing and a miss!" call of the announcer the cruelest fate in baseball? But what does it mean in the greater scheme?

Does having a tendency to swing and miss more than most impair a batter's productivity as we have been told since Little League? Do batters with better batting eyes tend to be more productive than the average batter? Is it better to be patient at the plate or go for the first pitch you can hit? Does this data tell us anything new and could that be used to help build a better team or find successful players?

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February 2, 2005 12:00 am

Prospectus Today: Sammy!

0

Joe Sheehan

The Cubs have gone to great lengths to trade their Hall of Fame right fielder. What does this deal mean for them and the Orioles?

This is a personality dump. The Cubs, frustrated by the disappointing end to their 2004 season, laid the blame at the feet of Sosa, whose outsized personality became less tolerable to them as his production dwindled. Sosa's bailing on the season's last game--an inexcusable act for which he was properly fined--was blown out of proportion as Cubs' management reached for a scapegoat for the team's collapse. Sosa shares the blame for the team's 2-7 finish with the rest of his lineup mates, but can't be singled out: he hit .250/.382/.536 in the season's last ten days.

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The Angels overspent for Garret Anderson. The Cubs hope Matt Clement can shake his early-season struggles. The Brewers will use Junior Spivey as trade bait. These and other news and notes out of Anaheim, Chicago and Milwaukee in this edition of Prospectus Triple Play.

  • Irrational Exuberance: The Angels' Arte Moreno opened up his wallet for Garret Anderson and found 48 brand new million dollar bills to be doled out over four years. To be fair, at times we've been overly critical of Anderson--that was mostly in the early days of his career when his superficial counting stats (BA, RBI) ruled the day. He's become a very useful ballplayer, even if he lacks the gaudy on-base percentage or spectacular defense that might raise him to star status.
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    June 12, 2003 12:00 am

    Prospectus Today: Something New

    0

    Joe Sheehan

    It's a clich to say that the great thing about baseball is that you can always see something you've never seen before. Of course, comments like that reach the point of cliche because they're true. Last night, the Houston Astros lost their ace starter, Roy Oswalt, in the second inning to a groin injury. This messed them up so much that they went on to use five relievers in completing the first no-hitter against the Yankees in almost 45 years. Peter Munro, Kirk Saarloos, Brad Lidge, Octavio Dotel, and Billy Wagner combined to strike out 11 batters in tossing the first six-pitcher no-no in MLB history. I'm a Yankee fan, and while I'm frustrated by this team's lack of depth and its terrible problems scoring runs, this was just cool. There's not a ton of analysis to be done here. No-hitters happen, and while the Astros' bullpen is probably more likely to do it than your average starting pitcher--getting lots of strikeouts helps, and the five relievers who threw average 10.1 Ks per nine innings--it's not like you can predict something like this. It was just one of those great baseball events, the kind of game that makes memories for the faithful and turns the uninitiated into fans.

    Of course, comments like that reach the point of clich because they're true.

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    Barry Bonds continued his domination of Internet NL Player of the Year voting by winning the IBA NL Player of the Year for the third straight year and the sixth time overall. Bonds has finished at least third in Internet NL Player of the Year voting after every season except 1999, when he was limited to less than 450 plate appearances by an injury.

    Barry Bonds continued his domination of Internet NL Player of the Year voting by winning the IBA NL Player of the Year for the third straight year and the sixth time overall. Bonds has finished at least third in Internet NL Player of the Year voting after every season except 1999, when he was limited to less than 450 plate appearances by an injury. Vlad Guerrero, who had finished in the top 20 each of the last four years, finished second despite playing for the seemingly doomed Expos. Randy Johnson, who finished in third place, was the highest ranking pitcher in Internet NL Player of the Year voting since Greg Maddux won the award in 1995. Albert Pujols, who finished fourth after his 2001 rookie campaign, moved up a notch to third in 2002 and was the only everyday player from a division winner to finish in the top ten.

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    November 7, 2001 12:00 am

    Staff Ballots

    0

    Baseball Prospectus

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