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Articles Tagged Salary Arbitration 

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The Padres' third baseman had a breakout 2012. If he hadn't settled with San Diego, how might his arbitration hearing have gone?

It's salary arbitration season in Major League Baseball, and here at Baseball Prospectus we're holding mock hearings, arguing for or against the actual team/player filing figures before a three-person panel of certified arbitrators. We've selected 10 of this winter's most intriguing, highest-dollar cases to cover in depth over the first two weeks of February (regardless of whether the players' real-life cases remain unsettled). After each side's opening argument and rebuttal/summation below, we'll give you a chance to vote on what you think the result should be before seeing the panel's decision. For more on the arbitration process, read the series intro by Atlanta Braves Assistant GM John Coppolella, listen to his appearance on Episode 35 of Up and In, or check out the BP Basics introduction to arbitration.

In Part One of this 10-part series, we'll tackle San Diego Padres third baseman Chase Headley, who (unbeknownst to our arbitrators) settled with San Diego for $8.575 million last week.

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February 20, 2012 3:00 am

Bizball: Inside the 2012 Salary Arbitration Class

5

Maury Brown

Taking a deeper look at the players who went through (or threatened to go through) the arbitration process this winter

Salary arbitration is a funny thing. In an era when club owners and COOs are more honed in on cost certainty with contracts than ever, few clubs fully know what player payroll for the upcoming season will be until approximately a month and a half before the season begins. Until each player has reached a contract or gone to hearing in the salary arbitration process, you don’t know what each player will ultimately be paid.

This year, I went diving deeper than ever before in salary arbitration, and for the time, I am making all my data for the 2012 salary arbitration season available for download. Here’s the details, plus an explanation as to why the increases, while large, shouldn’t be too surprising on a certain level.

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February 7, 2012 3:00 am

Bizball: Salary Arbitration Picture Postcards

16

Maury Brown

A look at why salary arbitration is an important and overlooked part of the off-season and which players and teams are involved this year

I’ve been informed (more than once, mind you), that “readers are not interested in salary arbitration.” Which I find stupefying; I can’t believe those watching the game closely aren’t paying (close) attention. Saying that there is no interest in salary arbitration in MLB is kind of like saying there is no interest in free agency. After all, Marvin Miller has said that salary arbitration, not free agency, has likely had a larger impact on the game.

Maybe it’s because the majority of the players involved are rank-and-file. Or, unlike free agency, salaries are (mostly) constrained within certain confines of “comping” to other players and their salaries. Maybe, it’s just that salary arbitration isn’t “sexy.” Whatever. That seems bogus. Readers should care for the same reason that owners, GMs, and MLB organizations care: it influences roster outcomes.

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Talking arbitration with long-time baseball arbitrator, professor, and author Roger Abrams.

While looking toward the future with our comprehensive slate of current content, we'd also like to recognize our rich past by drawing upon our extensive (and mostly free) online archive of work dating back to 1997. In an effort to highlight the best of what's gone before, we'll be bringing you a weekly blast from BP's past, introducing or re-introducing you to some of the most informative and entertaining authors who have passed through our virtual halls. If you have fond recollections of a BP piece that you'd like to nominate for re-exposure to a wider audiencesend us your suggestion.

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As teams and players settle in arbitration or avoid it entirely, refresh your memory on how the process works.

While looking toward the future with our comprehensive slate of current content, we'd also like to recognize our rich past by drawing upon our extensive (and mostly free) online archive of work dating back to 1997. In an effort to highlight the best of what's gone before, we'll be bringing you a weekly blast from BP's past, introducing or re-introducing you to some of the most informative and entertaining authors who have passed through our virtual halls. If you have fond recollections of a BP piece that you'd like to nominate for re-exposure to a wider audiencesend us your suggestion.

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Ellsbury, Kershaw, Lincecum, and Price are a few players out of 142 to watch in salary arbitration between now and mid-Feb.

It’s the start of the New Year, and with it, here comes MLB salary arbitration. The MLBPA has released the list of 142 players, and with it, between now and mid-Feb. every one of them will have their contracts in hand before or shortly after Spring Training starts.

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November 29, 2010 9:00 am

Contractual Matters: AL East Arbitration Forecast

1

Jeff Euston

The last of a six-part series looking at who might wind up before an arbitration panel in February.

The flurry of activity that is the Winter Meetings won’t begin for another week, but this week has a noteworthy event as well. Thursday is the deadline for clubs to offer 2011 contracts to unsigned players on their rosters. Last offseason, nearly 40 players joined the free-agent market at the non-tender deadline, and a few proved to be cost-effective contributors in 2010. Among those non-tenders who rebounded with solid performances were John Buck, Jack Cust, Matt Capps, and Kelly Johnson. So let’s check the arbitration outlook for 2011 for clubs in the American League East, the final installment in a six-part series spotlighting each of the divisions in the major leagues.

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August 2, 2010 8:00 am

Contractual Matters: August and Everything After

12

Jeff Euston

The non-waiver trade deadline has passed, but the dealing is not necessarily done

As Jose Guillen approached the plate for his first at-bat Saturday night, the Kauffman Stadium crowd greeted him with the sort of enthusiasm usually reserved for an unwanted house guest who has announced he is staying for another week. The non-waiver trade deadline had passed just a few hours earlier, and Kansas City general manager Dayton Moore had not found a taker for his cleanup hitter. As Guillen popped out to right, Royals fans unleashed another round of boos.

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February 25, 2009 2:01 pm

The Ledger Domain: Salary Arbitration Beats Free Agency

4

Maury Brown

Big scores were struck for the players through the arbitration process this winter.

"Honestly? What's to like about it?"
-Anonymous MLB executive, on the subject of salary arbitration


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April 13, 2008 12:00 am

Prospectus Q&A: Roger Abrams

0

David Laurila

Talking arbitration with long-time baseball arbitrator, professor, and author, Roger Abrams.

The Richardson Professor of Law at Northeastern University School of Law, Roger Abrams has been a baseball salary arbitrator since 1986. A former scholar-in-residence at the Baseball Hall of Fame, Abrams is the author of four books, including Legal Bases: Baseball and the Law, and Money Pitch: Baseball Free Agency and Salary Arbitration. David talked to Abrams about the baseball arbitration process, including who is eligible, what can and cannot be argued at a hearing, and why arbitration works.

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February 26, 2007 12:00 am

The Ledger Domain: The 2007 Salary Arbitration Results

0

Maury Brown

Summing up the totals on the more than 100 players who filed for arbitration this offseason.

It was the foresight of Marvin Miller, just after Curt Flood lost his challenge of MLB's antitrust exemption in the Supreme Court, that set the stage for the creation of salary arbitration. Miller understood that trying to achieve free agency for players immediately after the Flood ruling was not going to be fruitful, so salary arbitration was offered as an alternative. With the exception of Gussie Busch and Charlie Finley, the owners accepted the process as part of the new deal. Miller saw this as one of the greatest achievements of his early career as executive director of the MLBPA. He correctly anticipated that even though some players would lose their arbitration cases, they would still see a boost to their salaries as compared to not having the process.

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January 31, 2005 12:00 am

The Arbitration Process

0

Thomas Gorman

Over the next three weeks, hearings will be held to determine salaries for dozens of ballplayers. These hearings are the culmination of a process that begins in December, but has its roots in the early 1970s.

Salary arbitration had humble beginnings. The owners were exhausted by holdouts who refused to show up for spring training. The players were sick of having that refusal to play as their sole leverage in contract negotiations. With Flood v. Baseball failing to force a change in the reserve clause, arbitration seemed a reasonable solution.

Ed Fitzgerald, the Milwaukee Brewers Chairman and head of the owners' Player Relations Committee (PRC) in the early 1970s, embraced the idea as a way to neutralize the MLBPA's push for free agency. The Association's arguments against the owners would be weakened if the Lords showed a willingness to submit to binding and independent salary arbitration. Other owners, in particular the A's Charlie Finley and the Cardinals' Dick Meyer (who had experience with binding arbitration when he was labor chief of Anheuser-Busch), were suspicious, claiming that arbitration would drive salaries up. Which it would, compared to the status quo.

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