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Articles Tagged Sabermetrics 

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02-05

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24

Life at the Margins: What Comes After Sabermetrics?
by
Rian Watt

05-26

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16

Baseball Therapy: When Was the Sabermetric Revolution?
by
Russell A. Carleton

06-12

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0

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 469: Preserving Sabermetrics for Posterity
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

06-12

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9

Model Behavior
by
Lewie Pollis

05-16

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4

Pebble Hunting: The Meaning of 3-0 Green Lights
by
Sam Miller

05-13

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7

Baseball Therapy: Analytical Master or Leader of Men?
by
Russell A. Carleton

05-08

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10

Overthinking It: The Masters of the Manufactured Run
by
Ben Lindbergh

04-15

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16

Baseball Therapy: Why Sabermetrics Needs Translational Research
by
Russell A. Carleton

04-11

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0

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 426: A Conversation with Cuba's Sabermetric Splinter Group
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

03-03

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19

Overthinking It: Takeaways From Our First Look at the Future
by
Ben Lindbergh

02-26

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5

BP Unfiltered: Sabermetrics Goes MOOC
by
Zachary Levine

12-13

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4

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 348: Robot GMs, Bartolo at Bat, and Other Listener Emails
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

11-25

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38

Baseball Therapy: The Corner-Outfield Inefficiency
by
Russell A. Carleton

11-20

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3

Overthinking It: Baseball's New Kind of Coach
by
Ben Lindbergh

11-20

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1

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 333: How Teams Are Bridging the Gap Between Front Office and Field Staff
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

11-15

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17

Baseball ProGUESTus: Pitch Types and the Times Through the Order Penalty
by
Mitchel Lichtman

11-06

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4

Baseball Therapy: Is There a Pinch-Running Penalty?
by
Russell A. Carleton

11-05

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42

Baseball ProGUESTus: Everything You Always Wanted to Know About the Times Through the Order Penalty
by
Mitchel Lichtman

11-04

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10

Baseball Therapy: What Do Fielders and Homecoming Queens Have in Common?
by
Russell A. Carleton

11-01

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2

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 320: Colin Wyers on Mathematical Modeling for the Astros and the Future of Public-Sector Sabermetrics
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

11-01

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36

Manufactured Runs: Moments of Transition, Moments of Revelation
by
Colin Wyers

10-21

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0

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 311: The Postseason Mythbusters Edition
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

10-10

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8

The Semmelweis Reflex
by
Mike Gianella

10-08

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27

Baseball Therapy: What My Four-Year-Old Taught Me About Bunting
by
Russell A. Carleton

10-07

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5

Overthinking It: Dusty Baker and the Modern Manager's Survival Manual
by
Ben Lindbergh

10-04

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2

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 300: Brian Kenny on Sabermetrics, Broadcasting, and Confrontation
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

09-10

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16

Baseball Therapy: How to Work with Scouting Data
by
Russell A. Carleton

08-22

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3

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 271: Disciplining Puig/Trade Deadline Do-Overs/Mistaken Sabermetric Assumptions
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

08-13

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21

Manufactured Runs: SABR and the Importance of Preserving Sabermetric History
by
Colin Wyers

08-02

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3

Manufactured Runs: SABR Recap: On Motion Trackers, and Exciting Games
by
Colin Wyers

07-23

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4

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 249: Gabe Kapler on Advanced Stats from the Player's Perspective
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

07-16

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13

Baseball ProGUESTus: The Secret History of Sabermetrics
by
Jack Moore

07-03

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0

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 237: Stats That Won't Last/No-Hitters and No-Walkers/The Worst Shortstop Ever/A Pitcher Who Can Hit/The All-Bunting Team/Trading Top Prospects for Trout/Pint-Sized Power Hitters
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

06-24

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9

Baseball Therapy: The Zobrist Effect
by
Russell A. Carleton

06-03

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19

Baseball Therapy: Why Sabermetricians Should Watch Their Language
by
Russell A. Carleton

04-26

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46

Manufactured Runs: The Hawk Trap
by
Colin Wyers

04-25

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19

BP Unfiltered: Pitcher BABIP and Age
by
Ben Lindbergh

03-30

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10

BP Unfiltered: The Phillies and Scouts Without Stats
by
Ben Lindbergh

03-13

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21

Skewed Left: Saberizing the Gold Gloves
by
Zachary Levine

03-12

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15

Overthinking It: The Not-So-Secret Sabermetrics of Marketing
by
Ben Lindbergh

03-12

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1

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 157: SABR Analytics Conference Recap
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

03-12

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8

Baseball ProGUESTus: The Tyranny of Acronyms
by
David Murphy

03-11

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21

Baseball Therapy: Maybe I'm Wrong
by
Russell A. Carleton

01-02

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1

BP Unfiltered: The Twins and Sabermetrics
by
R.J. Anderson

12-23

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23

Overthinking It: Remembering Ryan Freel
by
Ben Lindbergh

12-21

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7

Overthinking It: The Mike Minor Mystery
by
Ben Lindbergh

12-21

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1

BP Unfiltered: The Best Comments About Mike Minor from May
by
Ben Lindbergh

11-27

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8

Baseball ProGUESTus: What Mainstream Baseball Analysis Looked Like in 1984
by
Chad Finn

11-21

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4

Sobsequy: Why We Need Sabermetrics
by
Adam Sobsey

11-19

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BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 85: Manny Acta and the Blue Jays' Managerial Job
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

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Are teams passing up an advantage by not telling their corner outfielders to trade places based on the batter?

On Friday’s episode of Effectively Wild, listener Matt Trueblood emailed the show to ask Ben and Sam a fascinating question. Why is it that teams do not have their left and right fielders switch places more often, particularly if one of them is a better fielder than the other? We know that some players like to pull the ball, while others like to hit to the opposite field. Why not put the better fielder in the place where it’s more likely that the ball will be hit? It’s a fascinating question because there is no rule that prohibits it from happening. In the era of the infield shift, why hasn’t anyone tried this?

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November 20, 2013 8:14 am

Overthinking It: Baseball's New Kind of Coach

3

Ben Lindbergh

On the rise of the defensive coordinator.

A few months ago, in a guest piece for BP, Gabe Kapler made the case for hiring Matt Martin, a coach whose passion and instructional skills had impressed him in the minors. On Monday, the Detroit Tigers took his advice, adding Martin to new manager Brad Ausmus’ staff.

The 44-year-old’s resume looks like that of many major-league coaches: some experience as a professional player, followed by close to two decades of minor-league coaching experience. His title is a lot less typical: “Defensive Coordinator,” a position familiar to football fans (though the NFL's "Quality Control Coach" is a closer equivalent) but almost unknown in baseball.*

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Ben and Sam discuss the new kind of coach being hired by big-league teams this offseason.

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How does a starter's repetoire affect his performance after the first trip through the lineup?

Most of our writers didn't enter the world sporting an @baseballprospectus.com address; with a few exceptions, they started out somewhere else. In an effort to up your reading pleasure while tipping our caps to some of the most illuminating work being done elsewhere on the internet, we'll be yielding the stage once a week to the best and brightest baseball writers, researchers, and thinkers from outside of the BP umbrella. If you'd like to nominate a guest contributor (including yourself), please drop us a line.

Mitchel Lichtman, or MGL, has been doing sabermetric research and writing for almost 25 years. He is one of the authors of The Book: Playing the Percentages in Baseball. He has consulted for several major-league teams over the years and has occasionally made a fool of himself on radio and TV. He holds a B.A. from Cornell University and a J.D. from the University of Nevada. You can check him out on Twitter at @MitchelLichtman or on his blog at www.mglbaseball.org.

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November 6, 2013 6:00 am

Baseball Therapy: Is There a Pinch-Running Penalty?

4

Russell A. Carleton

Do runners perform worse when they're inserted late in games?

With the end of the playoffs last week, we’ve reached the end of designated pinch runner season. Quintin Berry had a good run on the Red Sox postseason roster, appearing three times (once in each of Boston’s three postseason series) as a pinch runner and stealing a base each time. Over the past few years, it seems that teams have been more willing to use that strategy in the playoffs. The nice thing about a playoff roster is that with plenty of off-days, having guys on the bench who can cover for tired regulars isn’t as important. A lot of times it frees up a spot for a designated runner, a guy who is really, really fast, but has very little value in any other part of the game.

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An investigation into how much less effective starting pitchers get with each trip through the order.

Most of our writers didn't enter the world sporting an @baseballprospectus.com address; with a few exceptions, they started out somewhere else. In an effort to up your reading pleasure while tipping our caps to some of the most illuminating work being done elsewhere on the internet, we'll be yielding the stage once a week to the best and brightest baseball writers, researchers, and thinkers from outside of the BP umbrella. If you'd like to nominate a guest contributor (including yourself), please drop us a line.

Mitchel Lichtman, or MGL, has been doing sabermetric research and writing for almost 25 years. He is one of the authors of The Book: Playing the Percentages in Baseball. He has consulted for several major-league teams over the years and has occasionally made a fool of himself on radio and TV. He holds a B.A. from Cornell University and a J.D. from the University of Nevada. You can check him out on Twitter at @MitchelLichtman or on his blog at www.mglbaseball.org.

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An open letter in response to Murray Chass' recent rant about fielding metrics and the Gold Gloves.

Mr. Chass:

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Ben and Sam talk to Colin Wyers about how he got hired by the Astros, working in baseball, and where sabermetrics is headed.

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Colin thanks and bids farewell to the sabermetric community as he joins the Houston Astros.

While working on cleaning out my house recently (more about that later—but long tangents before I get to the point are a tradition around here, and I can’t well abandon that at the end, can I?), I came across a book called Understanding Solid-State Electronics. I don’t think I’ve seen it in years before now. It’s a bit dated. Actually, it was a bit dated even when I was reading it as a kid—its illustration of something that fits the Universal System Organization of sense, decide, and act is a record player.

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Ben and Sam talk to Russell Carleton about whether momentum and previous playoff experience matter, whether bunts are always bad, and the importance of shutdown innings.

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October 10, 2013 6:00 am

The Semmelweis Reflex

8

Mike Gianella

The industry may seem slow to adopt sabermetrics, but it is hardly the only case in which new lines of thought weren't readily accepted.

A data analyst is hired to analyze a problem a baseball team is having. He studies and studies the problem from as many angles as possible but still can’t solve the issue. Finally, he comes upon some data that offers strong, tangible evidence of how to fix the problem and comes back to the team with his findings. The manager institutes the analyst’s recommendations and the team’s on-field performance improves. But then the general manager finds out about the change and orders the manager to go back to the old way of doing things. The analyst’s recommendations fly in the face of conventional wisdom, so despite the proof offered, the team rejects the analyst’s findings. Worse yet, not only is the analyst’s advice rejected in this specific instance, but he is discredited in the industry for presenting such a controversial theory as fact. He never gets a job in baseball again, and dies alone, penniless and forgotten.

This story sounds terrible, and I don’t mean that from the perspective of the unfortunate analyst who is now living on the mean and gritty streets of Hypotheticalville. It comes across as apocryphal nonsense that couldn’t have possibly happened in the real world and was devised by a numbers-oriented writer to pedantically prove a point.

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Why bunting isn't as bad as you think.

My daughter completely schooled me this week. In the 2013 Baseball Prospectus Annual, I talked about how she, at the tender age of three, was a better sabermetrician than I, because she’s much more experimental about life than I am. She turned four a few months ago, so she’s not really young for her level any more, but she’s still better at this than I am. Last week, my wife and I were in the kitchen and my daughter was busily drawing a picture of… something. My wife mentioned that one of her friends had made a bunting (the kind that a baby wears) for her infant daughter. My daughter asked what a bunting was and my wife explained. As an afterthought, I tacked on, “and it’s a bad strategic play in baseball.” My daughter stopped drawing, looked over at me, and asked her favorite question, “Why?”

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