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Articles Tagged Ryan Hanigan 

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A three-way trade unites Jose Molina and Ryan Hanigan as a dreamy defensive duo.



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June 1, 2013 7:00 am

Prospectus Q&A: Russell Martin and Ryan Hanigan

0

Ben Lindbergh

A video walkthrough of framing technique with two talented receivers.

A few weeks ago, I wrote a feature on framing for Grantland. I also spoke to Pirates catcher Russell Martin and Reds catcher Ryan Hanigan for a pair of Q&A companion pieces in which I showed the two catchers GIFs of borderline pitches that they'd caught over the past few years, and they explained their strategy for getting extra strikes. Martin's is here, and Hanigan's is here. The conversations ran so long that much of the text was left on the editing room floor. Rather than let it remain unread, I've collected the best previously unpublished excerpts below, omitting any material that appeared at Grantland.

Russell Martin

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October 12, 2012 5:00 am

Playoff Prospectus: NLDS Recap: Giants Defeat the Reds

18

Sam Miller

The Giants didn't play their best five games, but it was good enough to beat a very good Cincinnati team to advance to the NLCS.

If you put enough gas in your spaceship and just keep flying, you’ll eventually get to a planet that looks just like this one. There’s a guy just like you and one just like me, and every letter the guy like you is reading was written exactly like the letters that I am actually writing. The only difference is that, on the other planet, Hideki Matsui was looking for a changeup, but Pedro Martinez threw him a fastball, and Matsui took it for a called strike three. The Red Sox kept their three-run lead. And it took eight years before Grady Little was ultimately scapegoated for a Boston loss and pushed out.

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October 10, 2012 5:00 am

Playoff Prospectus: NLDS Game Three Recap: Giants 2, Reds 1

6

Sam Miller

Despite playing excellent defense all year, the Reds drop Game Three to the Giants on a pair of defensive misplays.

Ryan Hanigan was behind the plate for 3,623 batters this year. On average, Reds pitchers threw 3.82 pitches per plate appearance, so Hanigan called 13,840 pitches. Of those, about 36 percent were either fouled away or put into play, so Hanigan actually caught roughly 8,854 pitches. Of those, about 59.5 percent came with bases empty. With runners on base this year, however, pitchers threw 3,588 pitches in Ryan Hanigan’s direction.

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Buster Posey, Alex Avila, and Ryan Hanigan are showing off different techniques in the postseason.

One of the side benefits of the postseason is its place as a sample. You get to see all kinds of different players with varying skill sets, talent levels, and techniques, and all the different ways they achieve success. The downside, if you want to call it that, is when you start noticing minute differences and it becomes a focus. Take catchers and their mitt positioning between setting the target and receiving the pitch. It’s the most-seen, least-noticed part of a catcher’s job. You focus on the mitt to see where the pitch is probably heading and then you shift your attention back to the pitcher once he begins his motion. But not every catcher passes the time in the same way:

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