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Articles Tagged Running Game 

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01-30

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5

Wezen-Ball: The 1948 World Series, Game1: A Radio Diary
by
Larry Granillo

10-02

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16

Head Games: The Other Thing R.A. Dickey Does Well
by
Will Woods

06-22

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15

Raising Aces: A Slide Step in the Wrong Direction
by
Doug Thorburn

02-15

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5

Collateral Damage: The DL Kings: Alex Escobar
by
Corey Dawkins

02-10

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14

The Stats Go Marching In: What Are the Rays Expecting from Jose Molina?
by
Max Marchi

01-13

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61

Heartburn Hardball: Jack Morris in Motion
by
Jonathan Bernhardt

10-31

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11

Baseball ProGUESTus: Silly Goose: Mariano Rivera and the Myth of the Seven-Out Save
by
Kevin Baker

10-23

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8

World Series Prospectus: Once, Twice, Three Times a Long Ball
by
Jay Jaffe

09-28

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11

Prospectus Hit and Run: A Night in the Life of Team Entropy
by
Jay Jaffe

05-30

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10

Prospects Will Break Your Heart: U Got the Look: Fielding, Part II
by
Jason Parks

03-30

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5

The BP Wayback Machine: Baseball's Hilbert Problems
by
Keith Woolner

03-04

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5

Baseball ProGUESTus: The Impact of World Series Starts (or How Much Was Jack Morris Really Worth?)
by
Sean Smith

12-31

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2

Prospectus Q&A: Best of Q&A 2010
by
David Laurila

11-02

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2

Prospectus Q&A: Jerry Howarth, Part I
by
David Laurila

10-27

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16

World Series Prospectus: Fall Classic Memories
by
Baseball Prospectus

10-26

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19

World Series Prospectus: World Series Preview
by
Christina Kahrl

10-24

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11

Playoff Prospectus: NLCS Game Six Recap
by
Christina Kahrl

10-14

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17

Playoff Prospectus: ALCS Preview: Rangers vs. Yankees
by
Jay Jaffe

10-05

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19

Playoff Prospectus: ALDS Preview: Twins vs. Yankees
by
Jay Jaffe

10-05

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6

Playoff Prospectus: NLDS Preview : Phillies vs. Reds
by
Christina Kahrl

08-29

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2

Between The Numbers: The PITCHf/x Summit Quasi-Liveblog
by
Ben Lindbergh

07-14

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23

All-Star Game: Observations from Anaheim
by
Christina Kahrl

06-18

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2

Prospectus Q&A: Davey Lopes
by
David Laurila

06-11

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3

Campus Notes: Super Regionals Preview, Part 2
by
Charles Dahan

05-05

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15

Checking the Numbers: Catchers on Catching
by
Eric Seidman

04-04

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3

Prospectus Q&A: Buck Showalter
by
David Laurila

03-17

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0

Prospectus Q&A: Tom Goodwin
by
David Laurila

03-07

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3

Prospectus Q&A: Chaz Scoggins
by
David Laurila

01-25

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63

Prospectus Roundtable: Analyzing RoboPitcher
by
Baseball Prospectus

01-11

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16

Checking the Numbers: Side Effects on Pitchers' Hitting
by
Russell A. Carleton and Eric Seidman

10-28

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25

World Series Prospectus: Yankees versus Phillies Preview
by
Jay Jaffe

10-23

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44

Prospectus Today: Speed Up for a Showdown
by
Joe Sheehan

10-20

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67

Prospectus Today: Putting the Drama in Drama Season
by
Joe Sheehan

10-18

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0

Prospectus Q&A: Ron Roenicke
by
David Laurila

10-15

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33

Playoff Prospectus: Dodgers vs. Phillies LCS
by
Jay Jaffe

10-14

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42

Prospectus Today: A Triple Play of Division Series Post Mortems
by
Joe Sheehan

10-08

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7

Playoff Prospectus: Angels versus Red Sox LDS
by
Christina Kahrl

10-07

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46

Prospectus Today: Who Can Say No to Twins?
by
Joe Sheehan

07-10

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11

Prospectus Hit List: Back in the Saddle Again
by
Jay Jaffe

07-07

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60

Prospectus Today: A Modest All-Star Proposal
by
Joe Sheehan

05-20

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4

Prospectus Q&A: Toby Harrah, Part 2
by
David Laurila

05-18

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34

Prospectus Today: The Play
by
Joe Sheehan

05-01

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12

Prospectus Hit List: Back to Earth
by
Jay Jaffe

02-22

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11

Prospectus Q&A: George Thorogood
by
David Laurila

10-28

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10

Prospectus Hit and Run: (Near) Hitless Wonders
by
Jay Jaffe

10-28

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2

You Could Look It Up: Called for Anticipation?
by
Steven Goldman

10-10

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5

Playoff Prospectus: Red Sox versus Rays
by
Christina Kahrl

10-08

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12

Playoff Prospectus: Dodgers versus Phillies
by
Jay Jaffe

10-01

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21

Playoff Prospectus: Dodgers versus Cubs
by
Christina Kahrl

10-01

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20

Playoff Prospectus: Phillies versus Brewers
by
Jay Jaffe

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A running diary of the two-hour radio broadcast of game 1 of the 1948 World Series, featuring Bob Feller and Johnny Sain.

Last week, Ben Lindbergh let us all in on the secret treasure trove of 50- and 60-year old radio broadcasts that Craig Robinson at Flip Flop Fly Ballin' recently uncovered. It's a pretty fantastic find, with games ranging from the 1948 World Series to a late summer game between the White Sox and Red Sox in the Impossible Dream season.

While Ben had a few things to say about Game 5 of the 1948 World Series, I recently listened to the full two-hour broadcast of Game 1 of the same series, a tight pitcher's duel between Bob Feller and Johnny Sain. Even for a game played when Jackie Robinson was the reigning Rookie of the Year, the game, at one-hour and forty-two minutes long, was a speedy affair. By contrast, Game 1 of the 2012 World Series between Justin Verlander and Barry Zito lasted three-hours and 26-minutes.

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R.A. Dickey will make his final start of the season tonight. You know how good he's been at retiring batters, but you might not know about something else he excels at.

R.A. Dickey, who makes his final start of the season this evening in Miami, doesn't lack for résumé bullet points to sway Cy Young voters. Unsatisfied to elevate his career at an age when most pitchers are heading out to pasture, Dickey has also elevated the standard to which knuckleballers can aspire. He leads the National League in strikeouts, innings pitched, complete games and shutouts. He has an ungodly 4.1 K/BB ratio. He’s been one of the few bright spots on a Mets team that might be in last place without him. And fine, I’ll say it: Dickey is the first Met to win 20 games since Frank Viola in 1990. He even offers enough charming human interest angles to fill several episodes of This American Life.

Allow me, then, to toss a molehill on top of that mountain of accomplishment: R.A. Dickey is doing a historically great job of holding runners on base. With agility, poise, and a deep understanding of the fundamentals—as well as some out-and-out flaunting of the rulebook, which we’ll examine later—Dickey has overcome the highest possible degree of difficulty to not only hold his own against the running game, but become one of the very best in baseball at shutting it down. In 2012, only three qualified starters in all of baseball have allowed fewer stolen base attempts per stolen base opportunity than Dickey (defining “stolen base opportunity” as a man on first or second with the next base open). The average qualified starter has allowed 5.81 stolen base attempts per 100 opportunities this season. Dickey has allowed 1.85.

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June 22, 2012 5:00 am

Raising Aces: A Slide Step in the Wrong Direction

15

Doug Thorburn

The slide step is intended to help pitchers, but would they be better off without it?

The classic Greek sabermetrician Plato said that necessity is the mother of invention.True to form, the slide step was borne from the need to suppress stolen bases at a time when the game was experiencing a record surge of thievery, but I submit that the strategy carries heavy costs that fail to outweigh the perceived benefits. The slide step invention is in dire need of an intervention.

The slide step is an artifact of the 1980s, a time when players such as Rickey Henderson and Vince Coleman were surpassing 100 stolen bases with regularity, terrorizing pitchers with constant distractions on the base paths. Since the Dead Ball Era, there have been 18 player-seasons that surpassed the 80-steal threshold, and 15 of those performances occurred in the 10-year stretch from 1979—1988. Henderson and Coleman were the last players to accomplish the feat, having tallied 174 steals between them in the '88 season, and were responsible for 10 of the 80-steal seasons between them, but the base-swiping explosion was hardly a two-man show (see accompanying chart). Today's top rogues of the base paths typically top out around 60 to 70 steals, with Jose Reyes' 78-steal tally of 2007 sticking out like a hitchhiker's thumb on the decade's SB leaderboard. For example, Michael Bourn has led the National League in stolen bases for three straight seasons, though his career-high is “just” 61 steals (accomplished twice). As Henderson told Harold Reynolds after the Mariner second baseman stole 60 bags in the 1987 season, “Rickey stole 60 at the break!”

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February 15, 2012 3:00 am

Collateral Damage: The DL Kings: Alex Escobar

5

Corey Dawkins

For this former prospect, a career like the game "Operation"

With only weeks to go until spring training gets into high gear, Collateral Damage takes a look at the baseball players (three pitchers, three position players) who have spent more time on the disabled list over the past decade than anyone else. Up next: Alex Escobar.

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A comprehensive look at catcher defense by BP's latest addition reveals that the Rays may be getting plenty of bang for their buck from their new backstop.

For more about Max, see his introductory post here.


At the end of the 2011 season, the Tampa Bay Rays declined catcher Kelly Shoppach’s $3.2 million option for 2012, setting him free to explore the market for his services. On November 28th, they signed Jose Molina as his replacement for one year and $1.8 million.


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A writer who never saw Jack Morris pitch watches him in action for the first time and comes away even less convinced that the traditionalist case for his candidacy should earn him a call to Cooperstown.

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Is Goose Gossage right to say that Mariano Rivera has it "easy?"

Believe it or not, most of our writers didn't enter the world sporting an @baseballprospectus.com address; with a few exceptions, they started out somewhere else. In an effort to up your reading pleasure while tipping our caps to some of the most illuminating work being done elsewhere on the internet, we'll be yielding the stage once a week to the best and brightest baseball writers, researchers and thinkers from outside of the BP umbrella. If you'd like to nominate a guest contributor (including yourself), please drop us a line.

Kevin Baker is a novelist and historian who is currently at work on a social history of New York City baseball, to be published by Pantheon.


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October 23, 2011 1:15 pm

World Series Prospectus: Once, Twice, Three Times a Long Ball

8

Jay Jaffe

Albert Pujols makes history in the process of putting the Cardinals up 2-1.

"When you have the bat in your hand, you can always change the story," said Reggie Jackson years ago. Mired in the controversy regarding a post-Game Two no-show following his ninth-inning relay flub, Albert Pujols changed the story on Saturday night, becoming just the third player ever to hit three home runs in a World Series game and collecting five hits en route to a Series-record 14 total bases. Before hitting his first home run, Pujols had already collected two hits while helping the Cardinals build an 8-6 lead; his three-run, sixth-inning homer off Alexi Ogando broke the game open en route to a 16-7 rout and a 2-1 Series lead. The Cardinals' 16 runs tied the 2002 Giants and 1960 Yankees for the second-highest single-game total in Series history.

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September 28, 2011 5:00 am

Prospectus Hit and Run: A Night in the Life of Team Entropy

11

Jay Jaffe

The playoff races have been de-zombified, and Team Entropy was on the prowl, looking for meaningful baseball going into the final game.

Welcome to Team Entropy! Grab a seat on the couch, and here, have a beer. You've been invited to this party because after almost exactly six months and 160 games of regular-season baseball, you've suspended the need to root for a specific team and are working for the greater good, more interested in maximizing the amount of end-of-season chaos the remaining schedule can produce. The amount of season, even, if it comes to a 163rd game—or two.

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Those who don the tools of ignorance don't just need physical prowess.

When it comes to evaluating low-level talent behind the plate backbone of the process is formed from observing the body and the natural movement(s) of the body—just like all other position evaluation. Baseball isn’t black and white, and players don’t always arrive wrapped in prototypical packages. This is especially true for catchers. When you think of a catcher’s build, what body type comes to mind? Let me guess: Shortish, with bulbous aspects of the frame (stocky); thick wrists; fullback body. Sound about right? You might think this represents the ideal, but ultimately it comes down to how the body works rather than how it measures out.

When evaluating a catcher, I care more about the athleticism, coordination, and strength involved than the inherent physical characteristics [read: height/weight]. Not every player carries weight well, or projects to carry weight well, while others inhabit bad bodies that somehow allow the requisite quickness and agility for the position to shine through. You can’t judge the body in isolation; you need to see the body walk the runway to see how it moves. Basic point: Just because the body doesn’t look the part doesn’t mean the body can’t perform the role. Basic Point #2 (which is really Basic Point #1 repackaged): Catchers can be fat.

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How many of the last millenium's burning baseball questions remain unanswered over a decade down the road?

While looking toward the future with our comprehensive slate of current content, we'd also like to recognize our rich past by drawing upon our extensive online archive of work dating back to 1997. In an effort to highlight the best of what's gone before, we'll be bringing you a weekly blast from BP's past, introducing or re-introducing you to some of the most informative and entertaining authors who have passed through our virtual halls. If you have fond recollections of a BP piece that you'd like to nominate for re-exposure to a wider audience, send us your suggestion.

Over 11 years after their publication in Baseball Prospectus 2000, how many of Keith's questions for a new millenium have we already set to rest?


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When is a World Series start worth as much as a Hall of Famer's whole career?

Believe it or not, most of our writers didn't enter the world sporting an @baseballprospectus.com address; with a few exceptions, they started out somewhere else. In an effort to up your reading pleasure while tipping our caps to some of the most illuminating work being done elsewhere on the internet, we'll be yielding the stage once a week to the best and brightest baseball writers, researchers and thinkers from outside of the BP umbrella. If you'd like to nominate a guest contributor (including yourself), please drop us a line.

Sean Smith is the owner of Baseballprojection.com and currently consults for a major-league ballclub.

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