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Articles Tagged Rob Neyer 

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Because what you really wanted was more bitter debate about the Hall of Fame.

Rob Neyer wrote an article about keeping an open mind during Hall of Fame voting season, about putting process ahead of results, about how being thoughtful is more important than coming up with the right answer. I should be supportive of these sentiments, I know. But these sentiments are being deployed alongside a rather poor example of being thoughtful. Neyer writes in the comments, in response to a reader saying there's no more evidence Jeff Bagwell used PEDs than Barry Larkin:

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February 2, 2011 10:00 am

Fantasy Beat: Value Picks at First Base, Third Base, DH, and Outfield

7

Rob McQuown

Questions about a young Brave, a towering Friar, a slumping Athletic, and more answered in today's by-request offering.

Free associating today, I realized that Jason Heyward wasn't even in grade school when I was a colleague of Rob Neyer's, back in the early days of STATS, Inc.  Ah, how time flies.  I am not the first, nor certainly will I be the last, to wish Rob well.  It's been a long time since those days sitting in the next cube over, and playing together on the company softball team, yet in some ways, Rob's still the same: still a fan of the game and still a "fan" of good writing—and still a great guy.  As the most visible “evangelist” for sabermetric writing over the past 15 years, all of us in this field owe Rob Neyer our professional thanks.

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It's playoff time, so Jason and I discuss when going with your ace on three days rest is a good thing, Saturday night's pitching match-up, and a change in the way we watch baseball. Then special guest Rob Neyer of ESPN stops by to chime on the playoffs with some interesting tangents here and there on how teams have gotten smarter. For Pop Culture Moment, writer Joel Stein (Time Magazine) comes on to talk about the book he's working on and how part of the research involved getting a baseball lesson from former All-Star Shawn Green. Then it's the usual goofiness as Jason pilfers a beverage.

It's playoff time, so Jason and I discuss when going with your ace on three days rest is a good thing, Saturday night's pitching match-up, and a change in the way we watch baseball. Then special guest Rob Neyer of ESPN stops by to chime on the playoffs with some interesting tangents here and there on how teams have gotten smarter. For Pop Culture Moment, writer Joel Stein (Time Magazine) comes on to talk about the book he's working on and how part of the research involved getting a baseball lesson from former All-Star Shawn Green. Then it's the usual goofiness as Jason pilfers a beverage.. As always, we hope you enjoy.

Note: We do alert you to the presence of the occasional adult language. Don't say we didn't warn you.

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The arguments for the second-place finisher on this year's BBWAA ballot have a few holes in them.

To no one's surprise, it was announced yesterday that Rich Gossage had been elected to baseball's Hall of Fame. One of the five best relief pitchers in history by any standard, Gossage picked up 85.8 percent of the vote (with "only" 75 percent required for election) in his ninth year on the ballot. Goose's omission from the Hall has stuck in his craw for some time, and he had been perhaps the player most vocal about his own status. With Bruce Sutter's induction in '06, however, Gossage's eventual ascension to immortality was assured. There's no better way to become a Hall of Famer than to have an inferior peer let into the room ahead of you.

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April 11, 2007 12:00 am

BP Kings Update

0

Ben Murphy

Everything you wanted to know about the BP Kings Charity Scoresheet Draft.

Peter Gammons' unfortunate incident focused the spotlight on cerebral aneurysms, but my connection is more personal. My mother had a cerebral aneurysm rupture way back in 1977 and was fortunate to survive.

Draft Strategy: Be strong at scarce positions offensively, avoided the dreaded Pitcher-AAA as always, and work on building a better bullpen to compensate for the lack of early starting pitchers. I sort of strayed from that strategy by taking John Lackey relatively early, and I might have a problem at second base if Jose Lopez doesn't pan out. I wanted to build a good core under the age of 30, and I did a fairly decent job of that. One of my harder decisions was my first one--Grady Sizemore vs. Joe Mauer. The consensus seems to be that I went the wrong with Sizemore--the consensus could be right, but I get the idea that three years from now Mauer won't be catching as often, to preserve his knees. Maybe that's too far forward to look, but at the same token, I see Sizemore as basically being risk-free.

I participated in the Mock Draft in the Scoresheet newsgroup, and because of that I expected the draft to be a little more prospect-heavy early-on. With the notable exception of Nate Silver, it wasn't, which suits me fine. I'm happy to have Brignac and Adam Miller among my top prospects.


King Kaufman & Rob Granickback to top
Charity: Physicians for Reproductive Choice and Health
Draft Strategy: Our only real strategy was to get big bats with the first few picks, then turn to pitching. Other than that, we basically reacted to the draft. We had the third pick, and in a league with an obvious top three, that made things easy. The one who's left is your guy, and that was Joe Mauer, whom we were happy to have. When Vernon Wells fell, we felt, to us at No. 22, we had our theme for the early part of the draft: Young, studly up-the-middle guys.


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July 20, 2006 12:00 am

Schrodinger's Bat: A Plethora of Blunders

0

Dan Fox

Dan dissects Rob Neyer's latest book--about the greatest mistakes in baseball history--and nominates a few recent moves for inclusion.

"Except it wasn't."

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May 13, 2003 12:00 am

Prospectus Today: Raffy Roundtable

0

Joe Sheehan

For the second time in a week, Joe dips into the ol' e-mailbag, this time answering questions about Rafael Palmeiro's candidacy for the Hall of Fame.

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Jonah Keri has ably analyzed the Colon trade and its ridiculousness for the Expos. I want to focus on the deal as an indicator of the shadiness and shame implied by the league's ownership of the Expos.

Jonah Keri has ably analyzed the Colon trade and its ridiculousness for the Expos. I want to focus on the deal as an indicator of the shadiness and shame implied by the league's ownership of the Expos.

First, some background. For better and for worse, Major League Baseball is a legal cartel. As such, it may be thought of as a sort of open, friendly conspiracy (it conspires to keep any competing league from offering top-level baseball in North America). Nothing wrong with that in itself -- we happily put up with cartels in most of our major sports, and in other areas of life as well. And as long as I the consumer understand the arrangement, benefit from it, and have some kind of recourse to get out from under it, what's the problem? No one makes me spend money on MLB or the NFL. If I have a beef with one of these cartels, I can always boycott their sponsors, or push for new laws to rein them in, or just go to Longhorn games instead. So far, so good.

But for their own long-term health, sports leagues must convince their consumers that they field a fair product, or else the entire attraction of honest competition is ruined. By this token, baseball's fans must be able to believe that MLB holds itself in check by various means, whether in the structure of the amateur draft, or in a player's arbitration calendar, or in the rules of the waiver wire. These rules (and many others) allow for open explanations of events: The Red Sox signed Johnny Damon fair and square under the free agency rules; the Yankees got stuck with Jose Canseco's contract because the Rays really were looking to unload him via waivers; there's only so long the Expos can hold onto Vlad Guerrero thanks to his free-agency calendar. And so on.

Whether we like an individual piece of news or not, we have reason to believe that matters were handled out in the open. The league's internal rules are made even more potent in this regard since they're monitored by a powerful player's union and, at least in theory, by an independent press.

Onto the problem at hand. The very nature of the league's ownership of the Expos raises the specter of misconduct - of a violation of consumers' trust - because it subverts this system of checks. Because the league now controls the Expos' players, this specter extends not just to Expos fans, but to fans of other teams (like the Red Sox), and to followers of the league as a whole.

Protestations of innocence from Selig & Co. are irrelevant. Maybe the Commissioner does have firewalls in place such that he holds no sway on the Expos' day-to-day operations. It doesn't matter. Again, it is the very nature of the arrangement that opens the way for back-channel, conspiratorial explanations for events. Indeed, given the current arrangement, it actually becomes logical to entertain such notions.

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I've gotten a lot of e-mail this week asking if I'm going to weigh in on the possibility of a Pete Rose reinstatement to baseball. This is in the wind because Rose met with Bud Selig to discuss how this might happen, and Selig, lacking both a backbone and any sense of integrity, didn't say "You're not getting back in, thanks for swinging by, I'll have my assistant call you a cab."

I've gotten a lot of e-mail this week asking if I'm going to weigh in on the possibility of a Pete Rose reinstatement to baseball. This is in the wind because Rose met with Bud Selig to discuss how this might happen, and Selig, lacking both a backbone and any sense of integrity, didn't say "You're not getting back in, thanks for swinging by, I'll have my assistant call you a cab."

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This could be fun. As of Tuesday morning, eight National League teams are separated by 6 1/2 games, and fighting for two playoff spots.

This could be fun.

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July 2, 2002 8:09 pm

The Daily Prospectus: July 2, 2002: SABR 32

0

Joe Sheehan

Over the weekend, I attended my first Society for American Baseball Research convention. It was the 32nd get-together for the organization, of which I've been a member for about three hours.

Over the weekend, I attended my first Society for American Baseball Research convention. It was the 32nd get-together for the organization, of which I've been a member for about three hours. Prodded by BP's Jeff Bower, I joined and made the trek to Boston for this year's gathering, which kicked off this summer's "Sheehan Across America" tour. (And to clear up the rumor, no, Papa Roach isn't opening for me.)

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Barring unforeseen circumstances, this will be the last edition of "Rany on the Royals" for a while. It's not that I no longer enjoy writing about the Royals, because I do. It's not even that I'm fed up with the futility of covering a team that seems utterly hopeless, because as cynical as some of my recent columns have been, I'm actually more optimistic today than I have been in some time.

Barring unforeseen circumstances, this will be the last edition of "Rany on the Royals" for a while. It's not that I no longer enjoy writing about the Royals, because I do. It's not even that I'm fed up with the futility of covering a team that seems utterly hopeless, because as cynical as some of my recent columns have been, I'm actually more optimistic today than I have been in some time. The White Sox look to me like a paper tiger, and I fully expect a .500 team to contend for the division title well into September.

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