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Articles Tagged Reggie Jackson 

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February 2, 2012 9:00 am

Overthinking It: The Overlooked Overlooked Hall of Famers

28

Ben Lindbergh

Why have two of the top 30 position players since 1950 been ignored by BBWAA voters and bloggers alike?

The last thing I want to do is create another Bert Blyleven.

I don’t mean Blyleven the pitcher or Blyleven the person. The world could probably use more of those. I’m talking about Blyleven the Overlooked Hall of Fame Candidate. Don’t get me wrong—I’m glad Blyleven is in the Hall of Fame. He deserves to be. His induction was a triumph of critical thinking over snap judgments, of evidence over empty arguments, of the hard work and research of writers like Jay Jaffe and Rich Lederer over the bluster and baseless self-assurance of others in the mainstream—an infinitesimal triumph, in the grand scheme of things, but a triumph nonetheless.

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How do you argue for Reggie Jackson over Adam Dunn without citing any stats?

A conversation between the author and his imaginary friend, Jay Whitman. Jay is not a fan of sabermetrics or advanced stats of any kind. We enter as the author, in a spirit of contrarianism, challenges Jay to explain why Reggie Jackson was a better player than Adam Dunn.

LG: Come on, this should be easy. Reggie's a Hall of Famer. Mr. October. Reggie Bars! Adam Dunn's just some guy who couldn't get a decent contract two years ago who (supposedly) hates baseball.

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September 8, 2011 10:35 am

Clubhouse Confidential: The Strikeouts That Stirred the Drink

7

Marc Carig

Reggie Jackson rues his strikeout-prone play, but were his whiffs really a problem?

“I was reminded that when we lose and I strike out, a billion people in China don't care.” -- Reggie Jackson

NEW YORK—There was a time when he viewed strikeouts as the cost of doing business, part of the price he had to pay for being who he was, an unapologetic slugger. After all, the drinks don't stir themselves. So if a few strikeouts found their way onto the back of his baseball card, it wasn't going to bother Reggie Jackson.

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January 4, 2011 9:00 am

Prospectus Q&A: Bob Kipper

2

David Laurila

Red Sox minor-league pitching coach Bob Kipper recalls his major-league playing experiences.

Before he became a highly-regarded minor-league pitching coach, Bob Kipper lived the dream that he now helps others pursue. The 46-year-old erstwhile left-hander spent eight seasons in the big leagues, and while his record was humble—27-37 with a 4.34 ERA and 11 saves—he considers himself privileged to have simply earned the opportunity. Taken eighth overall in the 1982 draft by the California Angels, Kipper was traded to Pittsburgh three years later and logged the bulk of his 247 career appearances with the Pirates. He has been a pitching coach in the Red Sox organization since 1999, and he spent the 2010 season mentoring hurlers in Double-A Portland.

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December 3, 2010 9:00 am

Future Shock: Chicago Cubs Top 11 Prospects

38

Kevin Goldstein

There's depth on the North Side, but is there enough impact talent to return the team to contention?

Previous Rankings: 2010 | 2009 | 2008

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The Toy Cannon discusses baseball in the 1960s, hitting home runs in a big ballpark and some Hall of Fame teammates.

Jimmy Wynn is a humble man, and he is also one of the most underrated players in baseball history. Known throughout his big-league career (1963-77) as “The Toy Cannon,” the 5-foot-9, 170 pound outfielder was not only a prodigious power hitter in one of baseball’s worst hitting environments, he was an on-base machine who could run. Originally drafted by Cincinnati, he spent most of his career playing in the Houston Astrodome and finished with 291 home runs, 225 stolen bases, a .366 OBP, and a 128 OPS+.

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October 21, 2007 12:00 am

Prospectus Q&A: Dave LaRoche

0

David Laurila

Former big leaguer Dave LaRoche is currently serving as pitching coach in the Toronto system. He talks with David about his successes with both his fastball and eephus pitch.

While he had a mid-90s fastball when he was an All-Star closer for the Indians and Angels, a much slower pitch comes to mind when many people think of Dave LaRoche. A flame-throwing left-hander for most of his 14 years in the big leagues (1970-1983), LaRoche reinvented himself when he joined the Yankees late in his career, often throwing a pitch that arced 20 feet in the air. The father of two big leaguers--Adam and Andy--LaRoche is now a pitching coach for the Blue Jays' Double-A affiliate, the New Hampshire Fisher Cats.

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Homo sapiens emerged from Neanderthal man about 38,000 BCE. It took another 31,500 years or so for the Sumerians to invent the wheel. There were 315 centuries of watching stones rolling downhill, fallen trees being pushed aside, dates falling off the table, before experience and observation could be transformed into principles (Hey! Round stuff rolls! Round stuff that rolls might be useful to have!) and those principles then put into practice (We should try to make round stuff that rolls!). Of course, as with all good ideas, some people never bought in. The Western Hemisphere did without the wheel until the Europeans showed up. Either the locals were too busy eating the corn to roll the cobs or they just didn't think much of wheels. As with the wheel, so too with the amateur draft, which kicked off in 1965 as a way to finally bring down those annoyingly persistent Yankees. Many of the lessons that have been taken away the draft--high school pitchers are riskier bets as college pitchers, don't draft high school catchers, etc.--were there to be found after the first few drafts, but it took several more years before experience hardened into a set of principles.

As with the wheel, so too with the amateur draft, which kicked off in 1965 as a way to finally bring down those annoyingly persistent Yankees. Many of the lessons that have been taken away the draft--high school pitchers are riskier bets as college pitchers, don't draft high school catchers, etc.--were there to be found after the first few drafts, but it took several more years before experience hardened into a set of principles.

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The new Hall of Fame Veterans Committee didn't elect anyone this year, despite having a number of excellent candidates in Ron Santo, Minnie Minoso, and the always-controversial Dick Allen. Because of this, it's likely that the rules will be tweaked in the future, lowering the threshold for induction. Never mind the fact that the Hall of Fame has much bigger problems on its hands, small induction classes mean small revenue for the folks in Cooperstown, New York. The more serious issues will have to wait. And the serious issues I'm referring to? How about the fact that the Hall of Fame needs to tweak its electorate as well as its rules in the future? Comments by some of the voters have made it clear that the Hall of Fame would be better served by new voters.

And the serious issues I'm referring to? How about the fact that Hall of Fame needs to tweak its electorate as well as its rules in the future? Comments by some of the voters has made it clear that the Hall of Fame would be better served by new voters.

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