CSS Button No Image Css3Menu.com

Baseball Prospectus home
  
  
Click here to log in Click here for forgotten password Click here to subscribe

Futures Guide 2014 is Now Available in Paperback and Three E-book Formats.

Premium and Super Premium Subscribers Get a 20% Discount at MLB.tv!

Articles Tagged Rebuilding 

Search BP Articles

All Blogs (including podcasts)

Active Columns

Authors

Article Types

Archives

09-17

comment icon

1

The BP Wayback Machine: The Tiger Plan
by
Nate Silver

07-09

comment icon

0

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 239: Carlos Gomez and the NL MVP Race/The Cubs and Trading Recently Signed Free Agents
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

06-04

comment icon

0

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 216: Whither the White Sox?/Dissecting Yasiel Puig's Debut
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

05-13

comment icon

2

Fantasy Freestyle: Dumping Targets, a Look Back
by
Mike Gianella

07-03

comment icon

8

Baseball ProGUESTus: Is Starlin Castro the Key to the Cubs' Rebuilding?
by
Sahadev Sharma

12-30

comment icon

1

On the Beat: Speak Softly and Carry a Lineup Card
by
John Perrotto

12-22

comment icon

9

The BP First Take: Thursday, December 22
by
Daniel Rathman

11-08

comment icon

8

The BP Wayback Machine: When Good GMs Go Bad
by
Jonah Keri

05-11

comment icon

10

Divide and Conquer, AL East: The Perpetual Rebuilders
by
Ben Kabak

03-14

comment icon

36

Ahead in the Count: Battle for the Beltway
by
Matt Swartz

01-18

comment icon

4

On the Beat: Warming up on the North Side
by
John Perrotto

09-17

comment icon

11

Kiss'Em Goodbye: Houston Astros
by
Steven Goldman, Kevin Goldstein and ESPN Insider

08-16

comment icon

10

Similar Yet Different
by
Jesse Behr

07-30

comment icon

34

You Could Look It Up: The Futility of Selling
by
Steven Goldman

07-15

comment icon

5

Mid-season Prescriptions: NL Central
by
Marc Normandin

03-08

comment icon

8

BP Unfiltered: AL East musings
by
John Perrotto

01-04

comment icon

27

Ahead in the Count: Service-Time Contracts and Wins, Part 1
by
Matt Swartz

09-06

comment icon

4

On the Beat: Weekend Update
by
John Perrotto

08-02

comment icon

5

On the Beat: Rust Belt Teams Rusted Out?
by
John Perrotto

07-27

comment icon

24

Prospectus Today: Going For It
by
Joe Sheehan

04-02

comment icon

31

Prospectus Today: The Bottom Ten
by
Joe Sheehan

11-17

comment icon

7

Hot Stove Preview
by
Jay Jaffe

10-05

comment icon

3

Every Given Sunday: Management Teams in the News
by
John Perrotto

06-18

comment icon

0

The Next Ten
by
Will Carroll

05-30

comment icon

0

Fantasy Focus: Keeper League Trade Issues
by
Jeff Erickson

02-11

comment icon

0

Spring Training Preview
by
Joe Sheehan

02-03

comment icon

0

Every Given Sunday: Gearing Up For Pitchers and Catchers
by
John Perrotto

01-28

comment icon

0

The Week in Quotes: January 20-27
by
Alex Carnevale

01-08

comment icon

0

Transaction Analysis: Breaking in the New Year
by
Christina Kahrl

10-30

comment icon

0

Lies, Damned Lies: Offseason Plans, AL East
by
Nate Silver

03-04

comment icon

0

Hope and Faith: How the Washington Nationals Can Win the World Series
by
Maury Brown

06-13

comment icon

0

Prospectus Q&A: Dave Dombrowski
by
Jonah Keri

01-07

comment icon

0

Can Of Corn: Rebuilding Redefined
by
Dayn Perry

08-14

comment icon

0

"This is Our Fault"
by
Steven Goldman

02-25

comment icon

0

Prospectus Q&A
by
Jonah Keri

07-02

comment icon

0

The Colon Trade
by
Deric McKamey

04-25

comment icon

0

Avoiding Dissonance
by
Jonah Keri

04-11

comment icon

0

The Daily Prospectus: The Daily Prospectus: The Future
by
Derek Zumsteg

04-11

comment icon

0

The Daily Prospectus: The Future
by
Derek Zumsteg

03-05

comment icon

0

Prospectus Feature: The Salary Cap: Another Viewpoint
by
Ted Frank

03-05

comment icon

0

The Salary Cap
by
Ted Frank

02-28

comment icon

0

Prospectus Feature: The Success Cycle
by
Jonah Keri

02-28

comment icon

0

The Success Cycle
by
Jonah Keri

04-01

comment icon

0

National League Predictions
by
Baseball Prospectus

No Previous Tag Entries Next Tag Entries >>

April 25, 2002 12:00 am

Avoiding Dissonance

0

Jonah Keri

Oh, it's not that bad, is it? Does your team really need a 22-year-old masher with power, patience and a good glove? Shouldn't you be focusing on that last spot in the team's eight-man bullpen instead?

If this horror show sounds familiar, take heart: you're not alone. GMs give away the farm all the time. It's the reason for their behavior that might scare you:

Read the full article...

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

April 11, 2002 3:49 pm

The Daily Prospectus: The Daily Prospectus: The Future

0

Derek Zumsteg

There's a new meta-argument I've been seeing a lot in my e-mail lately: if all franchises were run by Billy Beane, or those of his ilk, wouldn't market inequities resurface and make success solely about revenue? The case is made with a resigned air, almost to suggest that maybe it's best if we give up pushing the idea that smart, low-revenue franchises can hold their cards close and still compete with mega-funded teams like the Dodgers. If you look at what the future of enlightened baseball might hold, though, you'll see it's a pretty cool place.

 There's a new meta-argument I've been seeing a lot in my e-mail lately: if all franchises were run by Billy Beane, or those of his ilk, wouldn't market inequities resurface and make success solely about revenue? The case is made with a resigned air, almost to suggest that maybe it's best if we give up pushing the idea that smart, low-revenue franchises can hold their cards close and still compete with mega-funded teams like the Dodgers. If you look at what the future of enlightened baseball might hold, though, you'll see it's a pretty cool place.

The rest of this article is restricted to Baseball Prospectus Subscribers.

Not a subscriber?

Click here for more information on Baseball Prospectus subscriptions or use the buttons to the right to subscribe and get access to the best baseball content on the web.


Cancel anytime.


That's a 33% savings over the monthly price!


That's a 33% savings over the monthly price!

Already a subscriber? Click here and use the blue login bar to log in.

Today, there are organizations that are run incompetently from top to bottom, and others that do okay while openly scoffing at using performance analysis as an evaluation tool. Even if MLB decided tomorrow to clean up its own act--forcing franchise sales, allowing some franchise relocation, helping teams with terrible leases finance or renegotiate, and so on--and we further assume that all teams would be stocked with EnlightenedGM™ clones and front-office staff, it would take five years to turn these organizations into productive, well-oiled machines on the rise. In reality, it's going to take much, much longer, and until those franchises get smarter, they're going to operate at a severe disadvantage in all facets of competition.

Read the full article...

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

March 5, 2002 11:35 am

Prospectus Feature: The Salary Cap: Another Viewpoint

0

Ted Frank

The type of salary cap that is likely to be proposed by management in upcoming labor negotiations is probably a bad idea. But two recent articles at the Baseball Prospectus Web site overstate the case against salary caps in general.

The type of salary cap that is likely to be proposed by management in upcoming labor negotiations is probably a bad idea. But two recent articles at the Baseball Prospectus Web site overstate the case against salary caps in general.

One can immediately dismiss some arguments as irrelevant. Derek Zumsteg complains that salary-cap rules can be complex and boring. Certainly this is true in the NFL, where each team hires a professional full-time "capologist" to review a team's salary-cap compliance. This came about because the 1980s San Francisco 49ers were innovative and discovered that one could use the rules to structure contracts in a manner that, in effect, transferred future cap space to the present. Other teams weren't as clever right away, and the 49ers were dominant for years because they could effectively outspend other teams.

Eventually other teams caught on, and then the Niners' borrowing all came due at once, forcing the team to rebuild overnight. Now every team adopts the 49ers' methodology, and aims for building projects that give a team a two- to four-year window at the championship before the salary-cap borrowing forces them to rebuild from scratch.

The NFL salary-cap rules are close to inscrutable. Sportswriters don't understand them: Jay Fiedler's recent contract was reported as being for $24.5 million over five years, when it was really a two-year, $6.525-million contract with a team option for the last three years that will almost certainly be renegotiated in 2004. The "five-year" duration was purely a fiction to defer salary cap expense. If the teams need experts, and the media doesn't get the distinctions, it's pretty likely that most fans don't understand the NFL salary cap, either.

But so what?

How many baseball fans not named Doug Pappas can explain the options rule, or the system for awarding supplemental draft picks, or the Rule 5 draft, or the methodology of determining which third-year players are arbitration-eligible? Heck, the Dodgers were famously unaware in 1998 of the five-year-service/multi-year-contract rule that permitted Jeff Shaw to demand a trade, and had to renegotiate his contract to keep him. The opaqueness of a league's roster rules is hardly determinative of its soundness or of the ability of the fans to enjoy the sport.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

March 5, 2002 12:00 am

The Salary Cap

0

Ted Frank

One can immediately dismiss some arguments as irrelevant. Derek Zumsteg complains that salary-cap rules can be complex and boring. Certainly this is true in the NFL, where each team hires a professional full-time "capologist" to review a team's salary-cap compliance. This came about because the 1980s San Francisco 49ers were innovative and discovered that one could use the rules to structure contracts in a manner that, in effect, transferred future cap space to the present. Other teams weren't as clever right away, and the 49ers were dominant for years because they could effectively outspend other teams.

Eventually other teams caught on, and then the Niners' borrowing all came due at once, forcing the team to rebuild overnight. Now every team adopts the 49ers' methodology, and aims for building projects that give a team a two- to four-year window at the championship before the salary-cap borrowing forces them to rebuild from scratch.

Read the full article...

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

February 28, 2002 11:22 am

Prospectus Feature: The Success Cycle

0

Jonah Keri

Dave Littlefield had an opportunity to make an immediate impact after being hired as the Pirates' general manager last June. He could have traded Jason Kendall and Brian Giles to contending teams for a bushel of top prospects and started a new era in Pittsburgh baseball.

Dave Littlefield had an opportunity to make an immediate impact after being hired as the Pirates' general manager last June. He could have traded Jason Kendall and Brian Giles to contending teams for a bushel of top prospects and started a new era in Pittsburgh baseball.

He didn't do that, of course, and now the Bucs enter spring training with the same problems they faced a year ago. The major-league roster lacks talent. The farm system lacks top prospects, thanks largely to the Pirates' jones for toolsy players and their inability to teach plate discipline. The team has posted exactly zero winning seasons since Barry Bonds left town nine years ago. Rebuilding efforts have failed miserably.

For Littlefield to make a positive impact in his first full season as GM, he'll have to ask himself a question that should guide most of his decisions. Namely, "where in the success cycle does my team stand?"

The cycle is a baseball continuum on which every team resides. To measure a team's place in the cycle, assess its talent in the majors and minors. Can the players in the organization, mixed with a few trade acquisitions and free agents the team could reasonably sign, yield a competitive team? More precisely, can the team expect to compete while its current core of major-league players remain productive and under contract?

Apply this test to the Pirates. Can they reasonably expect to build a strong enough supporting cast around Kendall, Giles and Aramis Ramirez to compete this year? What about in 2003 or 2004? A weak major-league roster, a barren farm system and a pile of lousy long-term contracts say the odds are against them.

While asking where your team stands may seem like a simple proposition, how many teams truly take stock of their entire organization on a regular basis? How many devise a coherent plan for success? How many see that plan through by making consistent, intelligent decisions?

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

February 28, 2002 12:00 am

The Success Cycle

0

Jonah Keri

He didn't do that, of course, and now the Bucs enter spring training with the same problems they faced a year ago. The major-league roster lacks talent. The farm system lacks top prospects, thanks largely to the Pirates' jones for toolsy players and their inability to teach plate discipline. The team has posted exactly zero winning seasons since Barry Bonds left town nine years ago. Rebuilding efforts have failed miserably.

For Littlefield to make a positive impact in his first full season as GM, he'll have to ask himself a question that should guide most of his decisions. Namely, "where in the success cycle does my team stand?"

Read the full article...

National League East

Read the full article...

No Previous Tag Entries Next Tag Entries >>