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Articles Tagged Rebuilding 

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09-17

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1

The BP Wayback Machine: The Tiger Plan
by
Nate Silver

07-09

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BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 239: Carlos Gomez and the NL MVP Race/The Cubs and Trading Recently Signed Free Agents
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

06-04

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BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 216: Whither the White Sox?/Dissecting Yasiel Puig's Debut
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

05-13

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2

Fantasy Freestyle: Dumping Targets, a Look Back
by
Mike Gianella

07-03

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8

Baseball ProGUESTus: Is Starlin Castro the Key to the Cubs' Rebuilding?
by
Sahadev Sharma

12-30

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1

On the Beat: Speak Softly and Carry a Lineup Card
by
John Perrotto

12-22

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9

The BP First Take: Thursday, December 22
by
Daniel Rathman

11-08

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8

The BP Wayback Machine: When Good GMs Go Bad
by
Jonah Keri

05-11

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10

Divide and Conquer, AL East: The Perpetual Rebuilders
by
Ben Kabak

03-14

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36

Ahead in the Count: Battle for the Beltway
by
Matt Swartz

01-18

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4

On the Beat: Warming up on the North Side
by
John Perrotto

09-17

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11

Kiss'Em Goodbye: Houston Astros
by
Steven Goldman, Kevin Goldstein and ESPN Insider

08-16

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10

Similar Yet Different
by
Jesse Behr

07-30

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34

You Could Look It Up: The Futility of Selling
by
Steven Goldman

07-15

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5

Mid-season Prescriptions: NL Central
by
Marc Normandin

03-08

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8

BP Unfiltered: AL East musings
by
John Perrotto

01-04

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27

Ahead in the Count: Service-Time Contracts and Wins, Part 1
by
Matt Swartz

09-06

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4

On the Beat: Weekend Update
by
John Perrotto

08-02

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5

On the Beat: Rust Belt Teams Rusted Out?
by
John Perrotto

07-27

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24

Prospectus Today: Going For It
by
Joe Sheehan

04-02

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31

Prospectus Today: The Bottom Ten
by
Joe Sheehan

11-17

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7

Hot Stove Preview
by
Jay Jaffe

10-05

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3

Every Given Sunday: Management Teams in the News
by
John Perrotto

06-18

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The Next Ten
by
Will Carroll

05-30

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Fantasy Focus: Keeper League Trade Issues
by
Jeff Erickson

02-11

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Spring Training Preview
by
Joe Sheehan

02-03

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Every Given Sunday: Gearing Up For Pitchers and Catchers
by
John Perrotto

01-28

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The Week in Quotes: January 20-27
by
Alex Carnevale

01-08

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Transaction Analysis: Breaking in the New Year
by
Christina Kahrl

10-30

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Lies, Damned Lies: Offseason Plans, AL East
by
Nate Silver

03-04

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Hope and Faith: How the Washington Nationals Can Win the World Series
by
Maury Brown

06-13

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Prospectus Q&A: Dave Dombrowski
by
Jonah Keri

01-07

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Can Of Corn: Rebuilding Redefined
by
Dayn Perry

08-14

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"This is Our Fault"
by
Steven Goldman

02-25

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Prospectus Q&A
by
Jonah Keri

07-02

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The Colon Trade
by
Deric McKamey

04-25

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Avoiding Dissonance
by
Jonah Keri

04-11

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The Daily Prospectus: The Daily Prospectus: The Future
by
Derek Zumsteg

04-11

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The Daily Prospectus: The Future
by
Derek Zumsteg

03-05

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Prospectus Feature: The Salary Cap: Another Viewpoint
by
Ted Frank

03-05

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The Salary Cap
by
Ted Frank

02-28

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Prospectus Feature: The Success Cycle
by
Jonah Keri

02-28

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The Success Cycle
by
Jonah Keri

04-01

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National League Predictions
by
Baseball Prospectus

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May 30, 2008 12:00 am

Fantasy Focus: Keeper League Trade Issues

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Jeff Erickson

Trades are part of what makes fantasy baseball so much fun, but how do you keep the process from being abused?

We've had two hotly-debated topics within the RotoWire community the past week. One centered on the merits of keeper leagues versus redraft leagues, and the other dealt with the fallout from a controversial trade in one particular keeper league. I play in keeper leagues (and there are so many permutations of keeper leagues that it's not one-size-fits-all when discussing pros and cons) and redraft leagues, and enjoy both. While there are many good arguments for the superiority of redraft leagues, I tend to prefer my keeper leagues. They reward long-term planning better, they incorporate minor leaguers and the amateur draft well, and they allow teams to stay involved even over the offseason. One of the reasons to play fantasy baseball in its many forms is that it allows us to simulate the process of operating a baseball team, and the greater complexity and commitment that derives from keeper leagues allows us to come closer to that experience.

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February 11, 2008 12:00 am

Spring Training Preview

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Joe Sheehan

The Cubs made the best offseason move of any team in the division, and consequently are the team to beat among the Central's six heading into 2008.

Chicago Cubs

Where: Mesa, Arizona (Cactus League)
2007 record: 85-77 (1st, NL Central)
New guys: Jose Ascanio, Jon Lieber, Kosuke Fukudome
Gone guys: Cliff Floyd, Koyie Hill (NRI), Jacque Jones, Jason Kendall, Will Ohman, Angel Pagan, Mark Prior
Wow, he's still here? Felix Pie has been traded to Baltimore in a deal for Brian Roberts a thousand times in the media, and not once in MLB. With the Orioles having added Adam Jones, it would seem less likely that they'd acquire Pie, leaving the 23-year-old free to roam center field for the Cubs.
Winter grade: A-. Their only move of note-signing Fukudome-was a terrific one, giving them the OBP boost they sorely needed, and solidifying a position, right field, that was a problem in 2007.
NRI to watch: God bless him. Chad Fox, 37 years old and nearly three years removed from his last professional appearance, is in camp. Fox, who we used to describe as "effective when healthy," hasn't been either since 2003. Still, you have to root for a guy who wants it this badly.
Job battle to track: There's no obvious closer, as Ryan Dempster is being moved back to the rotation after a few years of relief. That leaves Kerry Wood, Bobby Howry and Carlos Marmol, all hard-throwing righties, grappling for the job. This seems like a good place for Piniella to re-create his 1990 Reds approach, with no closer and all three guys available for work from the seventh through the ninth.
One move to make: Slapping Lou Piniella with a clue stick. Piniella, who has a lot of good qualities as a manager, indicated last week that his lineup would feature Alfonso Soriano and Ryan Theriot in the top two spots, with Fukudome fifth. The Cubs' biggest problems on offense have been not having enough runners on base for Derrek Lee and Aramis Ramirez. Hitting Fukudome behind those two is a waste of his talents. If Soriano has to bat leadoff because he's fast, fine; at least bat Fukudome second and Theriot down in the lineup where he belongs.

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The major question for each AL team coming into camp, and the news from around the leagues.

Just 11 more days remain until one of the best days of the year for baseball fans. No, we're not talking about Valentine's Day. That's for greeting card companies and candy makers. This year February 14 is the day that pitchers and catchers begin working out in many spring training camps throughout Arizona and Florida. Among those who will celebrate Valentine's Day with a little PFP--pitchers fielding practice, for the uninitiated--rather than TLC will be the Orioles, Cubs, Astros, Royals, A's, Phillies, Giants, and Mariners.

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Wars of words, Bill Bavasi's oblique Bedard banter, and the art of creating low expectations in Oakland and Pittsburgh.

TWO LIKE SOULS DIVIDED BY I-95

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January 8, 2008 12:00 am

Transaction Analysis: Breaking in the New Year

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Christina Kahrl

The Swisher deal, Cardinal risks, and say Nomo forever.

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October 30, 2007 12:00 am

Lies, Damned Lies: Offseason Plans, AL East

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Nate Silver

The top and the bottom of the powerhouse division can build from within, leaving the AL East's middle class in an precarious spot.

This is the fifth of six-part preview of the impending off-season. I had been holding off on the two divisions involving World Series combatants until the games had concluded, but with the Series' hasty conclusion on Sunday--and Scott Boras' equally quick declaration that it's A-Rod Huntin' Season--now is the time to cover the AL East, where all five teams will have some very interesting decisions to make.

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It what might be an exercise of impossibility, Maury talks about the Nationals' hope and faith.

Will talks with Maury about Washington's chances in the Nationals Hope and Faith edition of Baseball Prospectus Radio. Click to download the mp3.

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June 13, 2006 12:00 am

Prospectus Q&A: Dave Dombrowski

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Jonah Keri

Jonah sits down with the architect of teams in Montreal, Florida and now Detroit to discuss building teams under difficult circumstances, the importance of finding front-office talent, and the development of the current Tiger squad.

Dombrowski made the best of suboptimal situations in both Montreal and South Florida, twice producing winning teams under difficult circumstances. But the Detroit Tigers seemed to be an even tougher task when Dombrowski took over. When owner Mike Ilitch hired Dombrowski as GM in the fall of 2001, the Tigers were coming off eight straight losing seasons. Lacking a strong farm system or star-level major league talent, many speculated that things could get worse before they got better in Detroit. Four more losing seasons, including the historically awful 43-119 season in 2003, proved those dire predictions true. But thanks to some strong drafting, a fruitful player development system and some well-timed trades and signings, the Tigers have come roaring back in 2006. More than one-third of the way through the season, Detroit sports the best record in MLB. Dombrowski recently chatted with Baseball Prospectus about the “r” word (rebuilding), the hidden value found in the Rule 5 draft, and tips on how to make the best of a bad situation.

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January 7, 2004 12:00 am

Can Of Corn: Rebuilding Redefined

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Dayn Perry

For quite a while now, teams with little hope of contending have been rightly ridiculed for throwing cash at high-end free agents despite a roster full of surrounding chaff. The Mets of the early '90s and Devil Rays for most years of their miserable existence as ball club-cum-novelty act are prominent examples of this phenomenon. Teams that indulged in this approach often squandered precious draft picks by signing free agents that had been offered salary arbitration by their former employers and also provided themselves with plenty of disincentive against trading high-salary veterans off for prospects. As you can see, in previous years, such an off-season approach would strike a pair of potent blows against the rebuilding process. Well, this may no longer be such a ham-fisted way of operating. As has been detailed here and elsewhere from various and sundry angles, baseball's economic landscape is now altogether different. Whether it's collusive in nature or merely a market correction isn't my concern at this time, but it is a market that bears scant resemblance to the one only two winters ago. A new wrinkle is that teams aren't offering arbitration to those free agents that, even a year ago, would've been no-brainers: Vlad Guerrero, Gary Sheffield, Mike Cameron, Greg Maddux, Bartolo Colon, Ivan Rodriguez, Javy Lopez, among a host of others. The idea being that the market for free agents is so depressed that there's now a substantive chance the player will accept arbitration and take his team to the cleaners, at least relative to what he'd command on the open market. The upshot of this development is that the overwhelming majority of free agents can now be signed without forfeiting high compensatory draft picks to his former club.

As has been detailed here and elsewhere from various and sundry angles, baseball's economic landscape is now altogether different. Whether it's collusive in nature or merely a market correction isn't my concern at this time, but it is a market that bears scant resemblance to the one only two winters ago. A new wrinkle is that teams aren't offering arbitration to those free agents that, even a year ago, would've been no-brainers: Vlad Guerrero, Gary Sheffield, Mike Cameron, Greg Maddux, Bartolo Colon, Ivan Rodriguez, Javy Lopez, among a host of others. The idea being that the market for free agents is so depressed that there's now a substantive chance the player will accept arbitration and take his team to the cleaners, at least relative to what he'd command on the open market. The upshot of this development is that the overwhelming majority of free agents can now be signed without forfeiting high compensatory draft picks to his former club.

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August 14, 2003 12:00 am

"This is Our Fault"

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Steven Goldman

In the July 25 edition of Transaction Analysis, Chris Kahrl critiqued the trade of reliever Mike Williams from the Pirates to the Phillies: There are other cranky topics, particularly the re-failure to acquire talent for Mike Williams in this year's Williams deal. Certainly, if it reflected any new appreciation for the interchangeability of closers beyond the top few personalities in the field, that would be nifty, but instead, it seems that people (appropriately) don't take Williams particularly seriously as a commodity, so the Pirates got things bad both ways, in terms of plugging in a replacement-level talent in the job, enriching him, and then not enriching themselves when the time came to deal him. Kahrl's analysis could be applied to the entire trading history of the Pirates franchise, a three-handed process in which the hometown GM extends a good player with one hand, accepts his return with the another, and pinches his nose shut with the third. The top 10 list of best trades in the history of the franchise remains virgin territory, while the worst-10 list provides for an overstuffed buffet of empty calorie choices. This article is a compendium of self-inflicted wounds suffered since the acquisition of the franchise by Kevin McClatchy. After the institution of the amateur draft in 1965 democratized (at least on paper) talent acquisition, a broken franchise, particularly an impoverished broken franchise, could right itself through a combination of smart trading, free-agent signings, and the rewards offered to losing teams by the draft. Over a long span lasting at least since the waning days of Barry Bonds as a Buc, the Pirates have consistently failed at all three.

Kahrl's analysis could be applied to the entire trading history of the Pirates franchise, a three-handed process in which the hometown GM extends a good player with one hand, accepts his return with the another, and pinches his nose shut with the third (see Part Two for the nearly complete cavalcade of Pittsburgh trading misfires). The top 10 list of best trades in the history of the franchise remains virgin territory, while the worst-10 list provides for an overstuffed buffet of empty calorie choices.

This article is a compendium of self-inflicted wounds suffered since the acquisition of the franchise by Kevin McClatchy. After the institution of the amateur draft in 1965 democratized (at least on paper) talent acquisition, a broken franchise, particularly an impoverished broken franchise, could right itself through a combination of smart trading, free-agent signings, and the rewards offered to losing teams by the draft. Over a long span lasting at least since the waning days of Barry Bonds as a Buc, the Pirates have consistently failed at all three.

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February 25, 2003 11:55 am

Prospectus Q&A

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Jonah Keri

Mark Shapiro enters his second season as General Manager of the Cleveland Indians, and 12th with the organization, in full rebuilding mode. Since winning six NL Central division titles in seven years, the Indians have said goodbye to stars Roberto Alomar, Jim Thome and Bartolo Colon and rebuilt the farm system through drafting, development and a series of opportune trades. He recently chatted with BP about the dangers of multi-year contracts, breaking prospects into the lineup, and the pressure of meeting fans' expectations.

Baseball Prospectus: Soon after you got the General Manager's job, you made some moves that seemed to counter the rebuilding process, like signing Lawton and Gutierrez to long-term deals. It's easy to look back now and see that those moves were mistakes--do you feel you've learned from some of the early mistakes you made?

Mark Shapiro: The toughest part about that time was the fact that we were not ready to abandon attempting to contend; we won our division in 2001. (The process) didn't sneak up on us--we knew we'd have some challenges. But we couldn't just say, it's over, boom. We had to do two things: attempt to contend and transition at the same time. We ended up going against external pressures anyway. If you wait until the rebuilding process is dictated to you, you'll be in trouble. Everything we did was geared toward expediting the transition process.

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July 2, 2002 12:00 am

The Colon Trade

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Deric McKamey

Coming into the 2002 season, first-year GM Mark Shapiro was straddling the fence. On one hand, he wanted payroll and roster flexibility, knowing that he was about to embark on a rebuilding process; thus, the trade of Alomar. On the other hand, he still felt the Indians could be competitive in the American League Central, a division with no dominant team. Signing Ricky Gutierrez and Brady Anderson to free-agent contracts and extending the contract of newly-acquired Matt Lawton, all deals that appeared to be well above the players' market value, was made in the effort to stay competitive. All of these moves were questionable at the time; three months into the 2002 season, they look even worse. Anderson has been released, Gutierrez is on the disabled list with a 595 OPS, and Lawton has been a disappointment, hitting .241/.350/.402.

With the Tribe having slipped below .500, Shapiro is acknowledging that the Indians do not have the personnel to compete against the Yankees, Red Sox and Mariners. He has elected to begin what will be a painful and arduous task--setting the framework for the next good Indians team.

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